Hawii Volcanoes NP

jeanluc

EOS 90D
Oct 29, 2012
183
88
Hi

I am going to be headed to the Big Island in Hawaii and am looking for any location, equipment or other advice that anyone has to offer.

I put a post on the EOS M section, and I think I have decided to bring the 5D3 after all.

I am looking for any advice about Akaka Falls and also any advice about shooting the lava glow from Kilauea by the Museum at Hawaii volcanoes NP, but any words about good seascapes, waterfalls etc is greatly appreciated.

Any advice about where to be, equipment, exposure and crowds at HVNP would be awesome.

Thanks!
 

Djaaf

EOS M6 Mark II
Jul 3, 2014
58
1
Paris - France
www.flickr.com
Hello !

We went to Hawai'i last year for our honeymoon. It's a pretty sight. :D

Concerning the places to see on Big Island, I've a few remarks on our trip :
Akaka falls and the botanical garden near Hilo are nice places to see, but not much to write home about. If you spend an afternoon in Hilo, it's worth the trip, but otherwise...

The Volcano Park is quite exceptional, though, and deserve at least two to three days.
The Kilauea viewpoint at night is a must, getting you shot like this :

The coast at the end of Chain of Craters road is worth a trip too :


A few walks around the trails in the park are worth an afternoon or two if you like to hike a bit (not very straining, over all).

A visit to the Mauna Kea summit is also worth it. If you've ever open an astronomy book or magazine, that's just unmissable. And be there either for sunrise or sunset.
You could get something like this :


Depending on the lava flows, you could get a guide to see the flows. That's also something quite unique.
After that, you may want to get to Black Sand Beach, where you can catch turtles resting on the sand, if you got a bit of luck.
If you plan to get to Kauna, getting a trip to swim with dolphins is nice but the night dive with the manta ray is one of the best experience in my life. :)

Green Sand Beach is mostly a rip-off, but if you're dying to see a muddy-green beach, well, enjoy yourself. :)

The Waipi'o valley lookout is nice if you got the time,you can even rent a horse to get down in the valley (or go on foot if you're more a hiker than a rider :) )

The whole album is here, if you want to take a look : My trip to Hawai'i

Djaaf.
 

jeanluc

EOS 90D
Oct 29, 2012
183
88
Thanks for the info, and sharing your album. Some very nice shots and nice to see what gear was used; that helps a lot.

Where did you shoot the tree frogs?
 

Djaaf

EOS M6 Mark II
Jul 3, 2014
58
1
Paris - France
www.flickr.com
jeanluc said:
Thanks for the info, and sharing your album. Some very nice shots and nice to see what gear was used; that helps a lot.

Where did you shoot the tree frogs?
No problems, always a pleasure to share. :)

The tree frogs (named Cookie frogs there, mainly because their call is awfully loud and sound like some youg child screaming "Coo-kie !" :) ) were shot in the hotel gardens in Volcano. The specie is rampant all around the Volcano national park, so it's not too hard to get to see one and since they're so loud, finding them is quite easy.

Gear side, most of my photos are taken with a Canon 6D, the 16-35 f/4 and the 24-105L (everything landscapy, mostly), brids and turtles with a Tamron 70-300 and the frogs with a 100mm Macro L.
Polarizing filter as needed, but not mandatory.
Tripod and Samyang 14 for the night shots, but starscapes are quite hard to get : the sky is very cloudy most of the nights (all of them for me, to be honest...) and Mauna Kea was quite a long way away from our hotels.
Humidity is high, so making sure there's no condensation on the camera on lenses when getting back to the hotel is necessary.

If you have other questions, feel free to ask. :)

Djaaf.
 

CanonFanBoy

Real men single speed.
CR Pro
Jan 28, 2015
5,172
3,347
Irving, Texas
Djaaf said:
jeanluc said:
Thanks for the info, and sharing your album. Some very nice shots and nice to see what gear was used; that helps a lot.

Where did you shoot the tree frogs?
No problems, always a pleasure to share. :)

The tree frogs (named Cookie frogs there, mainly because their call is awfully loud and sound like some youg child screaming "Coo-kie !" :) ) were shot in the hotel gardens in Volcano. The specie is rampant all around the Volcano national park, so it's not too hard to get to see one and since they're so loud, finding them is quite easy.

Gear side, most of my photos are taken with a Canon 6D, the 16-35 f/4 and the 24-105L (everything landscapy, mostly), brids and turtles with a Tamron 70-300 and the frogs with a 100mm Macro L.
Polarizing filter as needed, but not mandatory.
Tripod and Samyang 14 for the night shots, but starscapes are quite hard to get : the sky is very cloudy most of the nights (all of them for me, to be honest...) and Mauna Kea was quite a long way away from our hotels.
Humidity is high, so making sure there's no condensation on the camera on lenses when getting back to the hotel is necessary.

If you have other questions, feel free to ask. :)

Djaaf.
"Coqui" frogs. They are an invasive species and not native to Hawai'i. They'll drive you nuts at night.

Love your photos Vince!