Nikon releases a teaser video for the upcoming flagship Z 9 mirrorless camera

maulanawale

EOS M6 Mark II
May 25, 2021
74
141
The distortion is only when rapid panning or with rapid fan-like subject movement when you are using the electronic shutter. Just use mechanical shutter in those situations and you won't have distortion. If people would learn how to get the best from their gear and what to do in different circumstances, then there would be far less misleading criticism. (I have never had any of my shots spoiled by distortion using the electronic shutter, anyway.)
If people did that, it'd be the end of the internet as we know it :ROFLMAO:
But what a beautiful end though. . .

I think it is even more apparent with high end gear. Many people with pro grade cameras expecting pro grade results without pro grade knowledge or experience, and a massive loudspeaker in the shape of Youtube, forums, social media. . . (note that by Pro I don't necessarily mean paid professional but rather a very experience individual)

In this day and age, I think it's safe to say that if you fail consistently at getting sharp, undistorted photos of whatever subject tickles your pickle, it's 99% a biological interface error , the other 1% being a dodgy camera/lens that slipped through QC.
 

maulanawale

EOS M6 Mark II
May 25, 2021
74
141
That's fair enough. I don't believe it's true either that the R5 is consistently better than the A1, but the difference between the two is pretty small. I get annoyed by people panning the A1 as it is clearly really good and just as much by those who rubbish the R5 as it's in the same league.
I've thought about this before and discussed it at length with others, though of course not everyone will agree:

I'm a millennial and I think it is my generation and the ones after that are to blame for this.
More seasoned photographers (at least the ones I talk to) will tend to judge today's gear with an eye in the past and compare what they can do today with what they couldn't do 20 years ago.
Us "digital natives" are so used to the next best thing being released year after year, that we tend to look at technology with an eye in the future (or the neighbour) and, despite being amazed by it for a short while, it doesn't take long for it to turn into "yeah it's good, but it can't do 50fps/8k120/NoisefreeISO24x10^9 and of course I need that . . ."
 

EOS 4 Life

EOS R
Sep 20, 2020
1,097
861
If people did that, it'd be the end of the internet as we know it :ROFLMAO:
But what a beautiful end though. . .

I think it is even more apparent with high end gear. Many people with pro grade cameras expecting pro grade results without pro grade knowledge or experience, and a massive loudspeaker in the shape of Youtube, forums, social media. . . (note that by Pro I don't necessarily mean paid professional but rather a very experience individual)

In this day and age, I think it's safe to say that if you fail consistently at getting sharp, undistorted photos of whatever subject tickles your pickle, it's 99% a biological interface error , the other 1% being a dodgy camera/lens that slipped through QC.
People want professional results without professional skill.
It may be unrealistic but I do not think there is anything wrong with that.
Where it does go wrong is expecting better results just by buying more expensive gear.
 
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Codebunny

Elil
Sep 5, 2018
995
1,044
Scotland

Looks like it shoots 8k for quite a bit over a hour. Though, more interestingly it is shown in a wildlife setting so animal eye AF is assuredly coming to Nikon.
 

Codebunny

Elil
Sep 5, 2018
995
1,044
Scotland
My reply was to your post which I have pasted below, in which you claimed that the stacked sensor design was superior for “tracking a moving subject

I naturally assumed that you were referring to *AF tracking*, which is exactly what I addressed in my reply.…

Perhaps what you meant, was *visually tracking* the subject in the EVF, where the minimal time lag of a stacked sensor clearly makes a difference?

Visually Tracking. As I said, there is more to tracking a subject than your AF and AF tracking. Which is why stacked sensors are as big a change as OVF to mirrorless. Frankly mirrorless should have waited until we had stacked sensors.
 
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EOS 4 Life

EOS R
Sep 20, 2020
1,097
861
Visually Tracking. As I said, there is more to tracking a subject than your AF and AF tracking. Which is why stacked sensors are as big a change as OVF to mirrorless. Frankly mirrorless should have waited until we had stacked sensors.
I honestly only prefer stacked sensors for lower rolling shutter distortion.
I will always prefer a mirror to a video screen.
 
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maulanawale

EOS M6 Mark II
May 25, 2021
74
141
People want professional results without professional skill.
It may be unrealistic but I do not think there is anything wrong with that.
Where it does go wrong is expecting better results just by buying more expensive gear.
Agreed, absolutely nothing wrong, to each their own.
It is just setting yourself up for disappointment and frustration if you expect the best results without putting in the work, but that's just how life works I guess.

Having said that however, I've always been the kind that gets gear above his skill level, and it has become a motivation to learn the necessary skills. I just wouldn't think of blaming the camera for my inability to predict where a bird is going. :ROFLMAO:
 
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maulanawale

EOS M6 Mark II
May 25, 2021
74
141
I honestly only prefer stacked sensors for lower rolling shutter distortion.
I will always prefer a mirror to a video screen.
Sorry if I'm misunderstanding your post and this might be the silliest question in this thread.
Do you mean that DSLRs also suffer from rolling shutter distortion for stills? (I know some do for video)
I've had a Google but couldn't find anything and last time I used a DSLR, my subjects were mostly either stationary or very slow moving so can't speak from experience.
 

EOS 4 Life

EOS R
Sep 20, 2020
1,097
861
Sorry if I'm misunderstanding your post and this might be the silliest question in this thread.
Do you mean that DSLRs also suffer from rolling shutter distortion for stills? (I know some do for video)
I've had a Google but couldn't find anything and last time I used a DSLR, my subjects were mostly either stationary or very slow moving so can't speak from experience.
DSLRs are exactly the same.
Any camera with a CMOS rolling electronic shutter will have the same issue depending on the readout speed.
 
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maulanawale

EOS M6 Mark II
May 25, 2021
74
141
DSLRs are exactly the same.
Any camera with a CMOS rolling electronic shutter will have the same issue depending on the readout speed.
Of course! I completely dismissed the fact that some DSLR have ES and was thinking purely mechanical.
Thanks!