PRO-4000 print head went bad, could it be related to power outage/brown out?

Kit Lens Jockey

EOS R
CR Pro
Nov 12, 2016
889
606
I recently got a dreaded print head error on my PRO-4000 printer. It looks like there is no option but to replace the print head, which I have now ordered.

However, I'm suspicious because my house experienced a "brown-out" due to storms while I was out of town (and shortly after I got back.) For a period of time my wall outlets had about 80 volts coming out of them instead of the proper 110V. I leave the printer on all the time because it seems to be happier that way compared to constantly turning it off and on. So the printer was on when this occurred. But, it's worth noting that I had the printer plugged into a Furman PST-8 surge protector, which it pretty much the best surge protector you can buy. While I'm not 100% sure, I seem to remember that the surge protector wouldn't even turn on when the voltage in the house was low, so it might even have logic to just shut off the power going through it if it senses low voltage.


The print head error happened the very next time I used the printer after the power issues though. Now I'm trying to figure out if the print head damage might have been related to the power issues, or if it just coincidentally happened right at the same time.

What do you guys think? I have heard some people say the print heads only last about two years anyway, and if that's the case, then I guess mine was about due to go out. My main concern is that I usually only print one small thing about every week just to keep the head from clogging up. Maybe I need to print more often to avoid printer head issues in the future?

Ultimately I'm just not sure if I should consider the head failure a result of the power issues, even though I had it plugged into a very good surge protector, or if I should change my printing habits to prolong the life of the new head. Thanks.
 

DJL329

EOS R5
CR Pro
Aug 26, 2010
615
80
www.flickr.com
My old Canon i9900 died years ago, and I also suspected a power issue at the time. I replaced it with a PRO-100, and I keep the surge protector powered off, except when I need to print, obviously.
 

privatebydesign

I post too Much on Here!!
CR Pro
Jan 29, 2011
10,524
5,782
I recently got a dreaded print head error on my PRO-4000 printer. It looks like there is no option but to replace the print head, which I have now ordered.

However, I'm suspicious because my house experienced a "brown-out" due to storms while I was out of town (and shortly after I got back.) For a period of time my wall outlets had about 80 volts coming out of them instead of the proper 110V. I leave the printer on all the time because it seems to be happier that way compared to constantly turning it off and on. So the printer was on when this occurred. But, it's worth noting that I had the printer plugged into a Furman PST-8 surge protector, which it pretty much the best surge protector you can buy. While I'm not 100% sure, I seem to remember that the surge protector wouldn't even turn on when the voltage in the house was low, so it might even have logic to just shut off the power going through it if it senses low voltage.


The print head error happened the very next time I used the printer after the power issues though. Now I'm trying to figure out if the print head damage might have been related to the power issues, or if it just coincidentally happened right at the same time.

What do you guys think? I have heard some people say the print heads only last about two years anyway, and if that's the case, then I guess mine was about due to go out. My main concern is that I usually only print one small thing about every week just to keep the head from clogging up. Maybe I need to print more often to avoid printer head issues in the future?

Ultimately I'm just not sure if I should consider the head failure a result of the power issues, even though I had it plugged into a very good surge protector, or if I should change my printing habits to prolong the life of the new head. Thanks.
Two years seems about average pretty much regardless of the actual printing the head has done. I have replaced the head on my three year old Pro-2000 once.

One nice thing is the heads are easy to change and readily available, unlike Epson who will not sell their large format print heads.

An unnerving aspect of changing the head is that you can’t initiate a head change from the menu all the time it is telling you to replace the head! You have to switch the printer off, then manually move the head carriage then take the old head out, it takes just a few seconds. Then power the printer up and it will reset the carriage and give you an install head option. I found this very strange but Canon support talked me through it very efficiently.