RF 24mm f/1.8 Macro IS STM

neuroanatomist

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Jul 21, 2010
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Fun and compact, wide-angle macro lenses like the RF 24/1.8 (using Canon's terminology, although it only achieves 0.5x magnification) have many uses, including food photography and close-up wide angle. Close-up uses aside, the RF 24/1.8 also works well as a wide prime for indoor use. It's compact and pairs very well with a small body like the R8. Here are a few shots to start the thread, from some subjects around the yard.

"Peony Bud"
Peony Bud.jpg
EOS R8, RF 24mm f/1.8 Macro IS STM, 1/30 s, f/6.3, ISO 2500

"Iris"
Iris.jpg
EOS R8, RF 24mm f/1.8 Macro IS STM, 1/80 s, f/11, ISO 100

"Pollination"
Pollination.jpg
EOS R8, RF 24mm f/1.8 Macro IS STM, 1/80 s, f/11, ISO 160
 
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Does this lens require digital correction @neuroanatomist, to achieve image, or is it creating the image entirely optically ?
Picture quality looks very good.
There is certainly barrel distortion and optical vignetting in the RAW image, but that's true of pretty much all wide angle lenses, AFAIK. The RF 24/1.8 does not 'require' correction in the same way that the RF 14-35/4L or RF 16/2.8 do – in the uncorrected image, there are no black corners. Here's the Iris shot from above with the uncorrected RAW as a side-by-side and an animated comparison (to give a better sense of the 'corner stretching' from the distortion correction):

Iris Comparison.jpg

Iris Comparison.gif
 
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There is certainly barrel distortion and optical vignetting in the RAW image, but that's true of pretty much all wide angle lenses, AFAIK. The RF 24/1.8 does not 'require' correction in the same way that the RF 14-35/4L or RF 16/2.8 do – in the uncorrected image, there are no black corners. Here's the Iris shot from above with the uncorrected RAW as a side-by-side and an animated comparison (to give a better sense of the 'corner stretching' from the distortion correction):

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Thanks for comprehensive reply ! I’d call that optically corrected. These small primes make the RP/R8 more interesting; the issue I have with my RP is that my large lenses make it less appealing.
 
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These small primes make the RP/R8 more interesting; the issue I have with my RP is that my large lenses make it less appealing.
Large lenses is a big reason I prefer the ergonomics of the R3. For my upcoming summer trip, I did consider taking the 16/2.8, 24/1.8 and 85/2 instead of zoom lenses with the R8...but I will stick with the larger L zooms for the convenience and the better IQ. The RRS plate on the bottom of the R8 adds about 1 cm of height (similar to the Canon grip extension but with better functionality), so holding the camera with a heavier lens is ok, at least for short periods of time.
 
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I brought the RF 24/1.8 mainly for indoor low light use, and the interior of the Vatican was my primary use for the lens on my recent trip to Italy.

"Vatican Museum Map Hall" – There is plenty art along the walls in the Vatican Museums, but the ceilings are often even more impressive.
Vatican Museum Map Hall.jpg
EOS R8, RF 24mm f/1.8 Macro IS STM, 1/60 s, f/10, ISO 1250

"Vatican Museum Corridor" – Some corridors are almost an overload of artistic expression.
Vatican Museum Corridor.jpg
EOS R8, RF 24mm f/1.8 Macro IS STM, 1/80 s, f/7.1, ISO 1250

"St. Peter's" - Beautifully decorated interior of St. Peter's Basilica in the Vatican. So. Much. Gold.
St. Peter's.jpg
EOS R8, RF 24mm f/1.8 Macro IS STM, 1/60 s, f/8, ISO 6400
 
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