Show your Bird Portraits

dolina

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Dec 27, 2011
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dolina

millennial
Dec 27, 2011
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From a trip last month got a Peregrine Falcon on the nest. You can just see the egg in the first photo and the second one is a the partner about to start their shift.
View attachment 205697

View attachment 205698
Many bird watchers discourage photos of nests.

I appreciate "rule breakers" as I'd never know what to look for.

I love the image and your bravery.

I find it weird that the falcon doesn't use twigs or other softer materials than rocks.
 
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shire_guy

EOS M6 Mark II
Apr 29, 2020
68
208
Sydney, Aust
Many bird watchers discourage photos of nests.

I appreciate "rule breakers" as I'd never know what to look for.

I love the image and your bravery.

I find it weird that the falcon doesn't use twigs or other softer materials than rocks.
I can fully understand and agree with bird watchers not wanting nests disturbed or added stress levels to the parents.

However this was not the case in this instance. This photo is heavily cropped from 560mm on the R5. Exif data says it was 64 to 84 metres to the focus point and my guess would have been in that range. I was taking photos from a popular public viewing platform on the edge of an old volcanic vent. A lady from a local bird watching group was there and directed me, and others, to where the nest was. I was able to clarify for her records that there were three eggs as she could only make out two.

So I don't consider myself a "rule breaker" or brave.

I hope you enjoyed the photo, it is also the first time I have time seen a falcon nest in real life.
 
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AlanF

Desperately seeking birds
CR Pro
Aug 16, 2012
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I can fully understand and agree with bird watchers not wanting nests disturbed or added stress levels to the parents.

However this was not the case in this instance. This photo is heavily cropped from 560mm on the R5. Exif data says it was 64 to 84 metres to the focus point and my guess would have been in that range. I was taking photos from a popular public viewing platform on the edge of an old volcanic vent. A lady from a local bird watching group was there and directed me, and others, to where the nest was. I was able to clarify for her records that there were three eggs as she could only make out two.

So I don't consider myself a "rule breaker" or brave.

I hope you enjoyed the photo, it is also the first time I have time seen a falcon nest in real life.
I fully agree with you about respecting birds on nests and do the same. I had checked the distance on your EXIF and it was reading 74m away, so I had felt reassured and I then did a "like" after that. We have a local Peregrine pair that nest on a ledge not high up on a busy road in the centre of our town and is completely used to having people around. We have another pair in a park that nest on a ledge on a cliff about 80m from a viewing area. In both cases, it's clearly OK to take photos on conservation grounds, and our law on bird protection allows you to take photos from a public footpath for protected birds if you are not obtrusive.
 
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dolina

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Dec 27, 2011
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I can fully understand and agree with bird watchers not wanting nests disturbed or added stress levels to the parents.

However this was not the case in this instance. This photo is heavily cropped from 560mm on the R5. Exif data says it was 64 to 84 metres to the focus point and my guess would have been in that range. I was taking photos from a popular public viewing platform on the edge of an old volcanic vent. A lady from a local bird watching group was there and directed me, and others, to where the nest was. I was able to clarify for her records that there were three eggs as she could only make out two.

So I don't consider myself a "rule breaker" or brave.

I hope you enjoyed the photo, it is also the first time I have time seen a falcon nest in real life.
If I was living in a western country with millions of registered bird watchers I'd completely agree with their concern.

But if you're the only birder in the town/city/province/state and illegal mining/quarrying/agriculture/etc are a concern for habitat loss then photographing nests is as venial a sin as jaywalking on an unfinished road that 4x4 can only traverse.

BTW my reply is not a call out but reassurance that what you did has my like.


Philippine Trogon (Harpactes ardens) by Paolo Dolina, on Flickr
 
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