SIGMA and Tamron discontinue most of their DSLR lenses

entoman

wildlife photography
May 8, 2015
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Yes - but that is the answer at a theoretical level. At a practical level, the next question is whether or not it is actually possible to make an RF lens without violating Canon's patents. It seems to be possible for a fully manual lens (based on the fact various manual RF lenses seem to be staying on the market). For a lens with AF or other electronics though, it may or may not be (I certainly don't know), but it seems no one has managed to find a way to do it so far.
Yep, modern lenses incorporate a lot of chips and circuitry that "speaks" to the camera, especially to the AF system. The lens and body electronics are intertwined. It's pretty easy to copy the physical mount and the electrical contacts, but it's entirely another matter to unravel the mysteries of the circuitry, understand the protocols, and get the lens to work efficiently and without errors or malfunctions. Canon, Nikon and Sony can't even make their own cameras and lenses work without occasional freezes occurring, so what hope have Sigma and Tamron got?
 
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unfocused

Photos/Photo Book Reviews: www.thecuriouseye.com
Jul 20, 2010
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...Canon, Nikon and Sony can't even make their own cameras and lenses work without occasional freezes occurring, so what hope have Sigma and Tamron got?
I don't know about Nikon and Sony, but I have followed the freezing issue pretty closely with Canon (mainly because I have had the issue with two R5s and one R3). I have not seen any evidence (credible or not) that the phenomenon is lens-related. I have also not seen any cases where adapted lenses using the Canon RF adapters have any relationship to freezes. It may be difficult for third-parties to produce a mount that does not infringe on Canon's patents, but given how flawlessly both native and third-party EF mount lenses work with adapters, I don't see any reason why third-parties are facing any greater challenges with RF lens mounts than they were with EF lens mounts. Perhaps you have information to the contrary that you can share.
 
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entoman

wildlife photography
May 8, 2015
1,346
1,646
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I don't know about Nikon and Sony, but I have followed the freezing issue pretty closely with Canon (mainly because I have had the issue with two R5s and one R3). I have not seen any evidence (credible or not) that the phenomenon is lens-related. I have also not seen any cases where adapted lenses using the Canon RF adapters have any relationship to freezes. It may be difficult for third-parties to produce a mount that does not infringe on Canon's patents, but given how flawlessly both native and third-party EF mount lenses work with adapters, I don't see any reason why third-parties are facing any greater challenges with RF lens mounts than they were with EF lens mounts. Perhaps you have information to the contrary that you can share.
I agree that native EF lenses work flawlessly via adaptors (although not as fast as RF lenses). However, I think it's possible that the extra RF contacts may allow additional functionality on future Canon body and lens combinations. Sigma and Tamron could certainly manufacture RF mount lenses that didn't make use of the extra contacts, but they'd probably prefer to wait until they've been licenced (or have figured out the RF-specific protocols), to ensure full compatibility. Only guessing of course, and I could be completely wrong...

As to whether the freezing issues are in any way related to the lenses, I agree that it's unlikely, but the fact that Canon have been unable to pinpoint the cause(s) indicates that lenses could be one of the factors involved, especially as the electronics of the bodies and lenses are intertwined. In my case, I've only had freezing issues when using EF100-400mm and RF100-500mm, but that's probably due the fact that they are the only lenses that I use for burst shooting - all my freezes have occurred when shooting bursts.
 
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antonio_s

I'm New Here
Jul 10, 2022
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All the Sigma lenses listed are ancient and none are from the current GV (Art, Sports, Contemporary) lineup. As far as I know very few GV lenses have been discontinued (maybe just the 120-300 and perhaps one other I've forgotten). All of these discontinued lenses for Sigma have actually been unavailable for years.

On the other hand, there is no sign of any major discontinuations of the current Sigma Art lineup. A number of the Art primes are sold in the same optical formula for Canon EF and Sony E. I would be very surprised to see those discontinued for quite some time. Especially as Sigma is literally still promoting these lenses in the latest updates on their official blog: https://blog.sigmaphoto.com/ --- one of the last posts is about how great the 2019 primes are on the Canon R6 (https://blog.sigmaphoto.com/2022/ge...h-the-sigma-28mm-40mm-f1-4-dg-hsm-art-lenses/).

I don't know about Tamron, but Sigma seems like they're not getting rid of their EF lenses anytime soon. They also manufacture cine lenses, and the new ones they just announced are available in EF, though of course cine is its own thing.
 
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EOS 4 Life

EOS 5D Mark IV
Sep 20, 2020
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I don't know about Tamron, but Sigma seems like they're not getting rid of their EF lenses anytime soon. They also manufacture cine lenses, and the new ones they just announced are available in EF, though of course cine is its own thing.
Canon also released new EF/PL mount cine lenses
 
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Aug 7, 2018
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The nice thing about Sigma is that they have a mount conversion service. So for $100 or so you can convert your lens to another mount. The optical formula has to be compatible of course. Some lenses are only possible for mirrorless cameras. However you could buy a used Sigma lens for a Nikon DSLR and convert it to fit on the EF mount.
 
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Kharan

R6, RP, bunch of lenses
Nov 9, 2018
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Here we go again. There is nothing stopping them from making RF lenses, so long as they don't violate Canon's patents.
There is. Samyang were using their EF lens protocol on their RF lenses. This version must be clean, because it's been in use for many years and Canon didn't threaten them before (and they probably would've if it were). This, in turn, means that no patents have been infringed (there's broad consensus among people who know about patents that the bayonet itself cannot be thus protected). And yet they were threatened into submission by Canon... who have big offices in many countries, and probably lawyers on retainer there, who could easily file multiple parallel lawsuits against a smaller company. Sigma and Tamron are tiny in relation to Canon, and most certainly don't have lawyers on retainer in most markets. The cost of fending these suits off could be very high, and might prove a pyrrhic victory in the end.

There's something very real stopping third parties from going into RF: Canon "speaking softly and carrying a big stick". There won't be third-party AF lenses for RF unless one of three things happen: 1) 20 years pass from the time the patents were granted (so, around 2038); 2) a brave company decides to fight the lawsuits and wins, opening the floodgates; or 3) consumer backlash is intense and Canon see themselves forced to reverse course.

I'm ready to chip in for a "Viltrox Defense" GoFundMe. I think it's the only reasonably realistic chance we have.
 
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SteveC

R5
CR Pro
Sep 3, 2019
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The nice thing about Sigma is that they have a mount conversion service. So for $100 or so you can convert your lens to another mount. The optical formula has to be compatible of course. Some lenses are only possible for mirrorless cameras. However you could buy a used Sigma lens for a Nikon DSLR and convert it to fit on the EF mount.
I'm going to guess that they build the actual optical assembly as one part, and then attach what is essentially an adapter on the back of that for the mount in question. So their service just has to change back ends. No actual machine work needed!
 
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Dragon

EF 800L
May 29, 2019
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Dragon

EF 800L
May 29, 2019
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I haven't been able to find a new Sigma 180mm for sale (in the Netherlands) the past 3 years. Which is one of the reasons I went with the Canon 180L instead.
It has been formally discontinued on Sigma's web site for about that long. I found a decent used one about a year ago and it is a tad sharper than the 150, which I have had for about a decade. Both are very sharp lenses and the R5 focus stacking feature seems to work with both as well. The downside of the 180 is that it is a heavy beast. The Canon is not as fast (f/3.5 vs f/2.8), but it is substantially smaller and much lighter. https://www.the-digital-picture.com/Reviews/Lens-Specifications.aspx?Lens=109&LensComp=919
 
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