The Canon EOS R3 will be 24mp, confirmed by EXIF data

neuroanatomist

I post too Much on Here!!
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Jul 21, 2010
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Your are normal for your state with the mandated reporting over your signature under oath with criminal penalties but not for most states. Mine doesn’t have an income tax, and has no required report or assertion. I presume few do.
Your presumptions are as wrong as your 'facts'. Just more bullish!t.

"Of the 45 states with sales and use taxes, 38 also have an individual income tax. Of these 38 states, in 2012 27 provided for taxpayers to report use tax obligations on the individual income tax return, and another six, including Minnesota, provide information about the use tax in the individual income tax booklets." (reference)

27 states providing for use tax reporting on individual returns means more than half of the country, a very far cry from your presumption that 'few do'.

You really should stop embarrassing yourself with your ongoing posts on this topic, it's rather pathetic and each reply only serves to make you look more foolish.
 

BBarn

EOS M6 Mark II
Nov 2, 2020
69
54
... Here in a nation founded on tax rebellion, literally no individual anywhere has ever sent in uncollected state sales tax on an internet purchase ...

Wrong. I have paid hundreds of dollars of uncollected sales tax on internet purchases many years, following state law and in accordance with state tax forms. You can call me a fool if you want, but violators are criminals by definition.
 
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dtaylor

Canon 5Ds
Jul 26, 2011
1,743
1,307
Plus, if a lens shifts a focal plane with aperture, you simply don't care!
Under continuous shooting/continuous AF this should be true for the 2nd or 3rd frame forward. But as the recent TDP review of the RF 100mm macro shows, you can still get focus shift with single shot AF because the initial acquisition is made wide open. Focus shift is really something that should be managed at the lens firmware level though, and I imagine Canon will fix it there at some point.
 
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AlanF

Stay at home
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Aug 16, 2012
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Linear resolution sure, but I look at the difference as data points, and that is what images are made of. 24,000,000 is 20% more than 20,000,000.

I don’t see that it is relevant or fair to refer to a two dimensional image in one dimension.
If you are interested only in the number of pixels in an image, fair enough to compare the number of pixels in a sensor. If you are interested in how well that sensor resolves detail, then it is the square root that is crucial. It is scientifically correct to use linear (one-dimensional) resolution for determining the resolution of two-dimensional images. Suppose you are trying to separate adjacent images of points, then it's the linear resolution in all directions that determines whether the points are visibly separable from their neighbours. And, that's what I want know about a sensor; how much does it resolve fine detail? And that resolution scales with the square root of the number of pixels, and not the number of pixels. That is why the resolution of sensors is given in line-pairs/mm or lines per picture height, ie linear resolution, and not (line-pairs/mm)^2. Similarly with the focal length of lenses. An increase from 400mm to 500mm increases the number of pixels per duck by a factor of (500/400)^2 but resolves detail on that duck by a factor of only 500/400. And the resolution of lenses is also given in linear MTFs or linear line-pairs/mm etc or in angular degrees and not degrees^2.
 

Joules

doom
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Jul 16, 2017
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If you are interested only in the number of pixels in an image, fair enough to compare the number of pixels in a sensor. If you are interested in how well that sensor resolves detail, then it is the square root that is crucial. It is scientifically correct to use linear (one-dimensional) resolution for determining the resolution of two-dimensional images. Suppose you are trying to separate adjacent images of points, then it's the linear resolution in all directions that determines whether the points are visibly separable from their neighbours. And, that's what I want know about a sensor; how much does it resolve fine detail? And that resolution scales with the square root of the number of pixels, and not the number of pixels. That is why the resolution of sensors is given in line-pairs/mm or lines per picture height, ie linear resolution, and not (line-pairs/mm)^2. Similarly with the focal length of lenses. An increase from 400mm to 500mm increases the number of pixels per duck by a factor of (500/400)^2 but resolves detail on that duck by a factor of only 500/400. And the resolution of lenses is also given in linear MTFs or linear line-pairs/mm etc or in angular degrees and not degrees^2.
Nonetheless, 24 MP is 20 % more than 20 MP. It isn't really wrong to call that resolution, is it? What else does MP measure? Sure, it is ambiguous, but just from the natural way of reading it, stating that 24 MP is ~10 % more resolution than 20 MP is somewhat odd. Clarifying that linear resolution is meant would help.
 

neuroanatomist

I post too Much on Here!!
CR Pro
Jul 21, 2010
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InchMetric said:
No one cares about the trivial small percentage of unpaid uncollected tax...
Just to hang a few numbers on the 'trivial small percentage' you're talking about, in 2018 (the year prior to SD v. Wayfair), there was an estimated $517B in e-commerce, and the national average state-level sales and use tax rate was 5.11%. So, that 'trivial small percentage' represented about $26 billion dollars of lost state revenue in 2018. That's more money than the annual government budgets of 2/3 of the countries in the world.
 

Jack Douglas

CR for the Humour
Apr 10, 2013
6,850
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Alberta, Canada
Honesty goes much deeper than just $$$ so lets remember to be honest in all our ways and cut the debate. And there are many things that are more important than $$$ and stuff - like people in our lives so lets keep that in mind as we fume over MPs. :unsure: ;) It's been fun but I'm leaving.

Jack
 
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Ian K

EOS 90D
Jul 20, 2016
102
69
That is not true. Everything I've sold on Ebay in the last year ran sales tax on my buyers. I am a private seller.

I’ve 50 plus items listed and have always got all the money. It’s sold for apart from the 10% eBay fee. Uk VAT is 20% I’d have noticed if a huge chunk was missing. I agree it says it, I’ve just never ever seen it in practice. Granted I’ve never sold more than £10k a year. Pretty sure you been to turn over £85k/year before you have to register for vat.
 

AEWest

EOS RP
Jan 30, 2020
386
484
If you are interested only in the number of pixels in an image, fair enough to compare the number of pixels in a sensor. If you are interested in how well that sensor resolves detail, then it is the square root that is crucial. It is scientifically correct to use linear (one-dimensional) resolution for determining the resolution of two-dimensional images. Suppose you are trying to separate adjacent images of points, then it's the linear resolution in all directions that determines whether the points are visibly separable from their neighbours. And, that's what I want know about a sensor; how much does it resolve fine detail? And that resolution scales with the square root of the number of pixels, and not the number of pixels. That is why the resolution of sensors is given in line-pairs/mm or lines per picture height, ie linear resolution, and not (line-pairs/mm)^2. Similarly with the focal length of lenses. An increase from 400mm to 500mm increases the number of pixels per duck by a factor of (500/400)^2 but resolves detail on that duck by a factor of only 500/400. And the resolution of lenses is also given in linear MTFs or linear line-pairs/mm etc or in angular degrees and not degrees^2.
The answer is simple: if someone is talking resolution difference, that should mean total resolution, and therefore 24mp is 20% more than 20mp. If someone wants to refer to linear resolution, he or she should specify that upfront. Then there is no confusion.
 
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privatebydesign

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If you are interested only in the number of pixels in an image, fair enough to compare the number of pixels in a sensor. If you are interested in how well that sensor resolves detail, then it is the square root that is crucial. It is scientifically correct to use linear (one-dimensional) resolution for determining the resolution of two-dimensional images. Suppose you are trying to separate adjacent images of points, then it's the linear resolution in all directions that determines whether the points are visibly separable from their neighbours. And, that's what I want know about a sensor; how much does it resolve fine detail? And that resolution scales with the square root of the number of pixels, and not the number of pixels. That is why the resolution of sensors is given in line-pairs/mm or lines per picture height, ie linear resolution, and not (line-pairs/mm)^2. Similarly with the focal length of lenses. An increase from 400mm to 500mm increases the number of pixels per duck by a factor of (500/400)^2 but resolves detail on that duck by a factor of only 500/400. And the resolution of lenses is also given in linear MTFs or linear line-pairs/mm etc or in angular degrees and not degrees^2.
Well there is no doubt you are more scientific than I am, and a much more knowledgeable mathematician!

As so often happens with these things the most relevant way of looking at a question is often dependent on what we do as individual photographers. For instance I rarely crop other than for aspect ratio requirements or simple straightening and leveling of images, so ‘resolution’, meaning the ability to resolve detail, is nowhere near as relevant to me as somebody who is focal length limited and is trying to resolve small detail.

I think most people who are in the market for $5,000-$6,500 20-24mp cameras are not driven by the later scenario as they already have multiple options better suited to their needs, and I still see 24mp as a very real ‘upgrade’ from 20mp given those likely users.

Should an R1 come out with an 80mp sensor and a 30mp crop mode then I fear for yours and Jack’s bank accounts, I still won’t need it! (But I might like it sometimes!)
 

koenkooi

EOS 5D Mark IV
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Feb 25, 2015
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Actually, my bad, I’m sorry. You are correct. It is the same but depth. I was confusing electronic shutter and CRAW. Both raw formats become 12 bit when using electronic shutter.

However, CRAW is compressed. That compression is “lossy” or in other words not “lossless”. You do loose information by compressing the file. What you get back is not exactly the same as what you started with. It may be very hard to tell the difference, but Canon do admit there is one.
My biggest complaint with CRAW is that it prevents DLO from working, so I have to remember to switch back to regular RAW when using lenses like then EF28 f/1.8.

CRAW+ES is great when doing lots of bursts using a good lens, like trying to capture dragonflies in flight with the 100-500.
 

privatebydesign

I post too Much on Here!!
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Jan 29, 2011
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The answer is simple: if someone is talking resolution difference, that should mean total resolution, and therefore 24mp is 20% more than 20mp. If someone wants to refer to linear resolution, he or she should specify that upfront. Then there is no confusion.
But people accurately stating what they mean is very difficult across a basic earth wide platform where it is difficult to express differences in understanding, education, language, technical references etc etc.

How do you think we manage to stretch out a basic EXIF dump that was already posted and talked about at length in at least two other threads to twenty two pages?
 
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tmc784

Just press down the shutter.
Apr 1, 2018
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I don't need a sport camera. Save money for next year the R5C, hopefully.
 

AlanF

Stay at home
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The answer is simple: if someone is talking resolution difference, that should mean total resolution, and therefore 24mp is 20% more than 20mp. If someone wants to refer to linear resolution, he or she should specify that upfront. Then there is no confusion.
That answer may be simple, but it is simply wrong. Resolution is a linear measure, pixels per inch etc. See also for printing: printer resolution is given in dots per inch or metric equivalent https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dots_per_inch If you think you are correct, please define what "total resolution" is and where it is used technically. As you probably know, resolution can be different in different directions - astigmatism - and resolution in MTF charts is given in sagital and meridonial lines at right angles to each other.
 
Jul 29, 2021
1
1
I was really looking forward to the R3 as I was expecting the sensor to be in the 75 to 100mpx range.
If it has only a 25mpx sensor... I will personally be passing until mk2 or mk3 etc if and when the model refresh has at least treble the 25mpx size.
 
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tron

EOS R5
CR Pro
Nov 8, 2011
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I was really looking forward to the R3 as I was expecting the sensor to be in the 75 to 100mpx range.
If it has only a 25mpx sensor... I will personally be passing until mk2 or mk3 etc if and when the model refresh has at least treble the 25mpx size.
Well, judging by the rate the pro 1 series sensor mpixels increase we will get 75 to 100 mpixels (for these models) by the year 2200 to 2300 :ROFLMAO:

It's much easier to use R5 and/or 5DsR than wait :cool: