Travel / carry bags

Crapking

"Whatever you are....be a good one." AL
Nov 9, 2011
445
0
jjlabella.photoshelter.com
Santa left some gift cards and wondering which day bags people prefer?

Looking for over -the -shoulder, light models to carry a 7D with grip, 70-200, + 3-4 lenses and a flash.
Currently using the BlackRapid RS-5 Strap but hoping to add something for accessories.

Also looking to upgrade bag to travel by air.

Just read that Scott Kelby is using the Think Tank series - any comments / suggestions on preferred models, alternate brands ?

Will be adding a second FF body in March (assuming I can get my hands on a 1Dx - any info on pre-ordering would be appreciated).
 
U

UncleFester

Guest
There is a recent backpack thread around here somewhere with some good ideas and favorites.

I recently bought the ThinkTank Streetwalker Harddrive and I really like it. And I'm no fan of backpacks. Hate them. I spent the first 5 years of photography carrying everything around in a paper bag.
 

wickidwombat

EOS R5
Oct 27, 2011
4,543
0
speaking of think tank i recently got the belt which i use with some peak design captures, it works really well
 

scottkinfw

Wildlife photography is my passion
CR Pro
I have tons of bags. They look great in the store, and it isn't until I use them that I find out what I don't like.

I have found that some don't hold tripods, and some hold them on the side. Both bad if you need a tripod. In the latter case, when you put the pack on your back, it is always pulling to the heavier side.

That said, I am currently using Thinktank Airport Takeoff. I like it because it converts to a roller or back pack. It fits all overheads, including international flights. Great quality.

sek

wickidwombat said:
speaking of think tank i recently got the belt which i use with some peak design captures, it works really well
 

wickidwombat

EOS R5
Oct 27, 2011
4,543
0
scottkinfw said:
I have tons of bags. They look great in the store, and it isn't until I use them that I find out what I don't like.

I have found that some don't hold tripods, and some hold them on the side. Both bad if you need a tripod. In the latter case, when you put the pack on your back, it is always pulling to the heavier side.

That said, I am currently using Thinktank Airport Takeoff. I like it because it converts to a roller or back pack. It fits all overheads, including international flights. Great quality.

sek

wickidwombat said:
speaking of think tank i recently got the belt which i use with some peak design captures, it works really well
is there anything you dont like about it? looks pretty good, i have a lowepro sling but i've been finding perhaps a backpack might be better and having wheels is a good idea too
 

Harley

EOS 90D
Jul 19, 2011
165
0
I've been leaning towards a Gura Gear Kiboko, but although the reviews are spectacular, it's a bit of an expense.
 

neuroanatomist

I post too Much on Here!!
CR Pro
Jul 21, 2010
24,647
2,167
I really like my Lowepro Flipside 400 AW. Holds a gripped body and several lenses comfortably - last long trip, a gripped 5DII, 16-35L II, 24-105L, 70-200L II, TS-E 24L II, 35L, and 430EX II). The pack is comfortable enough to wear all day with a load, and has an all-weather cover. The main compartment opens in front (the part against your back) for extra security from casual opening/theft, and the design allows you to remove the shoulder straps and spin the pack to the front on the hip belt, where it serves as a lens-changing platform, and you never have to set the bag down on the street or in the mud.

For air travel, the loaded Flipside 400 AW fits snugly in a Pelican Storm im2500 hard case - allows rolling through the airport and more importantly, hard protection if you're forced to check your gear.
 

Kahuna

EOS M6 Mark II
Dec 24, 2011
94
0
+1 on the Lowepro Flipside. Great packs. I currently have the 300 which serves as my all around light travel bag. The con is that it is not all weather like the 400. I also own the Lowepro Dryzone which I would only recommend if you know you are getting wet or something extreme. I left a review on adorama if interested.

I think I should define extreme. I knew I was traveling to Fiji. I knew I was going to be in the RAIN forest (during the rainy season). I knew that I would be jumping from boats and swimming to some of the smaller islands. And I was stupid enough to bring my gear along.
 
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DCMoney

Guest
neuroanatomist said:
I really like my Lowepro Flipside 400 AW. Holds a gripped body and several lenses comfortably - last long trip, a gripped 5DII, 16-35L II, 24-105L, 70-200L II, TS-E 24L II, 35L, and 430EX II). The pack is comfortable enough to wear all day with a load, and has an all-weather cover. The main compartment opens in front (the part against your back) for extra security from casual opening/theft, and the design allows you to remove the shoulder straps and spin the pack to the front on the hip belt, where it serves as a lens-changing platform, and you never have to set the bag down on the street or in the mud.

For air travel, the loaded Flipside 400 AW fits snugly in a Pelican Storm im2500 hard case - allows rolling through the airport and more importantly, hard protection if you're forced to check your gear.
I am about ready to purchase the Flipside 400.

Received a Flipside 300 for Christmas but my 7D gripped, 70-200L II, 24-70L both with hoods in the reversed position along with a 430EX II, memory cards and some other stuff did not fit comfortably enough for me to be happy with it.

Was recommended the Flipside 400 on another forum, and after reading what your putting in your bag im now confident that what I'm putting in there will fit just fine.

One question do you keep your hoods on?
 

neuroanatomist

I post too Much on Here!!
CR Pro
Jul 21, 2010
24,647
2,167
DCMoney said:
One question do you keep your hoods on?
On most lenses, yes, usually reversed. The exceptions are the 16-35mm f/2.8L II and the TS-E 24mm f/3.5L II, both of which have shallow but very wide hoods - those I store separate from the lens.
 
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DCMoney

Guest
neuroanatomist said:
DCMoney said:
One question do you keep your hoods on?
On most lenses, yes, usually reversed. The exceptions are the 16-35mm f/2.8L II and the TS-E 24mm f/3.5L II, both of which have shallow but very wide hoods - those I store separate from the lens.
Thanks for the info, just ordered a flipside 400.
 

TexPhoto

EOS R
Apr 15, 2011
1,238
35
San Juan, PR
A bag is a personal choice and the first thing I'd advise is to get for hands on one before you buy. Find a camera store that has a selection.

I personally only buy LowePro. They are awesome and the lifetime no questions asked guarantee has replaced 2 used bags that had small failures. Both were bags I bought used off eBay. The AW series have hidden rain covers that have saved my butt, or at least my gear.

I really like the slingshot bags and own a 200 and 300. (these are now the 202 and 302 after some upgrades) The 200 was my day bag/diaper bag for 4 years and never failed me. i only moved to a 300 to accommodate a larger lens.
 

Michael_pfh

EOS RP
Nov 7, 2011
228
0
Singapore
I am using LowePro Stealth Reporter D300AW and Lens Trekker 600AW bags as well as a Rimowa Tropicana 384.03 case and can highly recommend all of them.
 

Crapking

"Whatever you are....be a good one." AL
Nov 9, 2011
445
0
jjlabella.photoshelter.com
Was originally interested in wearing /carrying gear at indoor volleyball tournaments, not necessarily trekking adventures or air travel - went back and forth between the Lowepro FLIPSIDE and the Think Tank Retrospective series. Ultimately chose the lower profile Think Tank Retrospective. It was a tough call because of the positive feedback on the FLIPSIDE model, and the extra $$, but decided against the backpack model and ordered the messenger style Retro 30. Appreciate everyone's input, though. Enjoy my daily visits to the FORUM :)
 

Crapking

"Whatever you are....be a good one." AL
Nov 9, 2011
445
0
jjlabella.photoshelter.com
FWIW, I received the bag yesterday (Think Tank Retrospective 30). The bag is well built/sturdy canvas-type feel, is loaded with pockets/dividers, and has very nice zippering with nice adjustable straps/carry handles. Looks like a man-bag and not a camera bag. Only 2 'complaints' are that when carrying over the shoulder, the cover flap is pretty long and must be folded over itself to gain full access to interior, but because it is so big, it does serve well as a shelf when changing lenses - very handy even though it slows the lens-change process down slightly. The other minor flaw is the side pockets are 2 small/tight to carry gatorade bottles- they barely fit a slim water bottle. But, there is a handle loop where you can hang a carabiner to a lexan bottle, so no biggie but just one more thing flopping around, and one more item to remember to bring. Better for the environment I guess, (and my gut,) as now I'll bring Crystal Light, instead of buying gatorade :)
 

ronderick

EOS RP
Jul 21, 2010
396
0
46
Taiwan
Crapking said:
Only 2 'complaints' are that when carrying over the shoulder, the cover flap is pretty long and must be folded over itself to gain full access to interior, but because it is so big, it does serve well as a shelf when changing lenses - very handy even though it slows the lens-change process down slightly.
I must say that having this feature can actually be beneficial in certain situations... such as wading through a large crowd. Quick access for you is equivalent to quick access for others while ur not looking.
 

Crapking

"Whatever you are....be a good one." AL
Nov 9, 2011
445
0
jjlabella.photoshelter.com
True - but there is excellent closure protection with velcro - 2 sets actually, which are very sticky. You need to pull with both hands to lift off the flap, and inside, an additional flap which allows another layer of closure of the long side pocket with more velcro. This is definitely a well-made, and thought out bag, and I am looking forward to a long day of shooting with it next weekend.