Turn the IS OFF!

Don Haines

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Jun 4, 2012
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We all know not to leave the IS turned on when using a tripod... This is what happens when you do not.

Shot with a 7D2 and a Tamron 150-600, 10 seconds at ISO3200. First picture with IS ON, second with it OFF.
 

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CanonFanBoy

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Don Haines said:
We all know not to leave the IS turned on when using a tripod... This is what happens when you do not.

Shot with a 7D2 and a Tamron 150-600, 10 seconds at ISO3200. First picture with IS ON, second with it OFF.
;) ;) ;)When I saw the first photo the first thought was, "Was it a successful coupling? When do we get to see the sonogram?" ;) ;) ;)
 

neuroanatomist

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Jul 21, 2010
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Don Haines said:
We all know not to leave the IS turned on when using a tripod...
Do we? Most Canon lens IS systems are tripod-sensing, so there's no need to turn IS off with the switch. In the case of supertele lenses, Canon's IS system actively damps mirror and shutter vibration when on a tripod. Personally, I've tested IS on vs. off with my 100L and 600/4 II on a tripod, leaving IS set to ON has no detrimental effect, provided you allow the ~0.5 s necessary for the system to become fully active (i.e. don't just mash down the shutter).

So while your example is good to know for owners of the Tamron 150-600, I don't believe that advice is generically applicable to all lenses.
 

Don Haines

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Jun 4, 2012
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neuroanatomist said:
Don Haines said:
We all know not to leave the IS turned on when using a tripod...
Do we? Most Canon lens IS systems are tripod-sensing, so there's no need to turn IS off with the switch. In the case of supertele lenses, Canon's IS system actively damps mirror and shutter vibration when on a tripod. Personally, I've tested IS on vs. off with my 100L and 600/4 II on a tripod, leaving IS set to ON has no detrimental effect, provided you allow the ~0.5 s necessary for the system to become fully active (i.e. don't just mash down the shutter).

So while your example is good to know for owners of the Tamron 150-600, I don't believe that advice is generically applicable to all lenses.
good point!

I should also mention that the shutter was triggered by a remote so I would not be causing vibration by pressing the shutter button.... using the timer will accomplish the same....
 

neuroanatomist

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Jul 21, 2010
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Don Haines said:
neuroanatomist said:
Don Haines said:
We all know not to leave the IS turned on when using a tripod...
...leaving IS set to ON has no detrimental effect, provided you allow the ~0.5 s necessary for the system to become fully active (i.e. don't just mash down the shutter).
I should also mention that the shutter was triggered by a remote so I would not be causing vibration by pressing the shutter button.... using the timer will accomplish the same....
A remote trigger could be an issue – the 'mashing down' isn't only about mechanical vibration, it's about not allowing time for IS to engage. In my testing with the 100L, having IS on and just pressing the shutter all the way down, without a ~0.5 s half-press, was significantly worse than handheld with IS off. I surmise that when IS starts up, the elements 'jump around' a bit before settling down and stabilizing the image. So, even when using a remote trigger, it is important to half-press the button for a brief period before releasing the shutter. Or use the self timer as you suggest, which will keep IS active during the countdown.
 
Years ago I had the old 70-300 f/4.5-5.6 IS lens and took a bunch of cityscape shots at night that were all mush because of the IS so I understand. As Neuro says, most of the newer Canon lenses don't have this issue, but I haven't heard of any 3rd party lenses with "tripod sensing" IS.
 
Jan 16, 2014
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I leave mine on all the time. It's most effective in dampening all the frickin' earthquakes here in California.
Kidding. I not only turn it off, but use live view to reduce vibrations to an absolute minimum. Heavy tripod goes without saying.
I ruined all my long exposure shots of the skiers coming down the mountain on new years by forgetting to turn the IS off on the 24-105L. All the light trails looked like we were having 6.0 earthquakes.
 

Don Haines

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Jun 4, 2012
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neuroanatomist said:
Don Haines said:
neuroanatomist said:
Don Haines said:
We all know not to leave the IS turned on when using a tripod...
...leaving IS set to ON has no detrimental effect, provided you allow the ~0.5 s necessary for the system to become fully active (i.e. don't just mash down the shutter).
I should also mention that the shutter was triggered by a remote so I would not be causing vibration by pressing the shutter button.... using the timer will accomplish the same....
A remote trigger could be an issue – the 'mashing down' isn't only about mechanical vibration, it's about not allowing time for IS to engage. In my testing with the 100L, having IS on and just pressing the shutter all the way down, without a ~0.5 s half-press, was significantly worse than handheld with IS off. I surmise that when IS starts up, the elements 'jump around' a bit before settling down and stabilizing the image. So, even when using a remote trigger, it is important to half-press the button for a brief period before releasing the shutter. Or use the self timer as you suggest, which will keep IS active during the countdown.
I turn Mirror Lockup on and set the camera to the 10 second timer and trigger it with the remote. When the remote trigger is pressed, the mirror moves into position and the camera has 10 seconds to stabilize. I use my heavy tripod and a gear head to minimize vibrations from the camera support and try to stand as still as possible.
 
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I'll add that in high wind conditions, with even a heavy tripod, IS helps. Obviously, those long night exposures would be screwed anyway. I had to park the SUV right next to the tripod for a wind break when shooting the Perseids.
 

IglooEater

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Nov 15, 2014
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neuroanatomist said:
Don Haines said:
We all know not to leave the IS turned on when using a tripod...
Do we? Most Canon lens IS systems are tripod-sensing, so there's no need to turn IS off with the switch. In the case of supertele lenses, Canon's IS system actively damps mirror and shutter vibration when on a tripod. Personally, I've tested IS on vs. off with my 100L and 600/4 II on a tripod, leaving IS set to ON has no detrimental effect, provided you allow the ~0.5 s necessary for the system to become fully active (i.e. don't just mash down the shutter).

So while your example is good to know for owners of the Tamron 150-600, I don't believe that advice is generically applicable to all lenses.
Do you have a list of canon lenses that are and are not tripod sensing? Il still turning IS of on tripod ´cause I'm not sure if my lenses have it or not.
 

neuroanatomist

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IglooEater said:
Do you have a list of canon lenses that are and are not tripod sensing? Il still turning IS of on tripod ´cause I'm not sure if my lenses have it or not.
It's a short list, only the 1st gen IS lenses – four in total, released from 1995 to 1998:

  • EF28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM
  • EF75-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM
  • EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS USM
  • EF300mm f/4L IS USM

The 75-300 IS was discontinued, replaced by the 70-300 IS (non-L) in 2005, and the 100-400 was recently updated to the MkII. The other two are still 'current'.
 

Ryananthony

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Nov 7, 2015
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I hate having the IS activated by the shutter button or af-on button. I have decided to put IS start @ depth of field preview button. I would rather choose when I want IS by the push of a button, not the flick of a switch.
 

IglooEater

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neuroanatomist said:
IglooEater said:
Do you have a list of canon lenses that are and are not tripod sensing? Il still turning IS of on tripod ´cause I'm not sure if my lenses have it or not.
It's a short list, only the 1st gen IS lenses – four in total, released from 1995 to 1998:

  • EF28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM
  • EF75-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM
  • EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS USM
  • EF300mm f/4L IS USM

The 75-300 IS was discontinued, replaced by the 70-300 IS (non-L) in 2005, and the 100-400 was recently updated to the MkII. The other two are still 'current'.
Thanks Neuro, awesome so my lenses are good. Great to have a guy around with such a large stash of facts in memory. :D
 

Don Haines

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Jun 4, 2012
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neuroanatomist said:
IglooEater said:
Do you have a list of canon lenses that are and are not tripod sensing? Il still turning IS of on tripod ´cause I'm not sure if my lenses have it or not.
It's a short list, only the 1st gen IS lenses – four in total, released from 1995 to 1998:

  • EF28-135mm f/3.5-5.6 IS USM
  • EF75-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM
  • EF100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS USM
  • EF300mm f/4L IS USM

The 75-300 IS was discontinued, replaced by the 70-300 IS (non-L) in 2005, and the 100-400 was recently updated to the MkII. The other two are still 'current'.
This is what I like about this forum. I am always learning stuff!
 

Valvebounce

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Hi Don.
It took 2 nights and loads of ruined shots with my Σ150-500 lens whilst on holiday in Jersey (Chanel islands) before I realised the problem, it is the Image Stabiliser turning off half way through the shot, I ended up listening to the lens to work out what was happening. Really surprised that the power to the IS is cut when the shutter is still open! ???
I was hoping leaving IS on would help slightly with the wind buffeting on the long lens, nope it just quits half way through the shot! :mad:

Cheers, Graham.
 

docsmith

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Sep 17, 2010
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Tripod sensing on canon lenses isn't perfect. They need contrast. Without it they will continue to search. Of course, I had to learn this the hard way. So, I try to remember to always off IS when using a tripod.
 

RBC5

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Jun 18, 2016
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neuroanatomist said:
A remote trigger could be an issue – the 'mashing down' isn't only about mechanical vibration, it's about not allowing time for IS to engage. In my testing with the 100L, having IS on and just pressing the shutter all the way down, without a ~0.5 s half-press, was significantly worse than handheld with IS off. I surmise that when IS starts up, the elements 'jump around' a bit before settling down and stabilizing the image. So, even when using a remote trigger, it is important to half-press the button for a brief period before releasing the shutter. Or use the self timer as you suggest, which will keep IS active during the countdown.
So on the new lenses that have a 3rd option for IS - it doesn't engage while focusing, only when the shutter is pressed - how exactly does that engage? It must be pretty fast. I wonder if that would work on a tripod...or if a remote makes a difference... I've never used a lens with that setting.
 

neuroanatomist

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RBC5 said:
So on the new lenses that have a 3rd option for IS - it doesn't engage while focusing, only when the shutter is pressed - how exactly does that engage? It must be pretty fast. I wonder if that would work on a tripod...or if a remote makes a difference... I've never used a lens with that setting.
When IS is off, the IS elements are parked and the gyroscopic sensors are off. As I understand it, with Mode 3 IS the gyros are on and the elements are unlocked but held in the centered position by the motors. Thus, it can start stabilizing near instantaneously.
 

RBC5

EOS M6 Mark II
Jun 18, 2016
57
0
neuroanatomist said:
RBC5 said:
So on the new lenses that have a 3rd option for IS - it doesn't engage while focusing, only when the shutter is pressed - how exactly does that engage? It must be pretty fast. I wonder if that would work on a tripod...or if a remote makes a difference... I've never used a lens with that setting.
When IS is off, the IS elements are parked and the gyroscopic sensors are off. As I understand it, with Mode 3 IS the gyros are on and the elements are unlocked but held in the centered position by the motors. Thus, it can start stabilizing near instantaneously.
What a fantastic piece of engineering. I would love to see how that works.

All this talk about IS is making me hungry. I'm going to have a gyro.