Which big white for wildlife

docsmith

EOS R
CR Pro
Sep 17, 2010
1,043
483
First off, congratulations.

My quick answer is going to be 200-400 +1.4xTC for the flexibility of the zoom (and built in TC) and amazing IQ. In my mind, primes are all about specific purposes, I would only get the 400 f/2.8 (are you think Mk 1, 2 or 3?) for one reason, bokeh. Really, it is subject isolation. I have heard the 400 f/2.8 II called one of the best bokeh lenses of all time. But, I personally, do not see many around because another factor usually wins out: More reach, 500/600 mm. More flexibility, 200-400 f/4.

Next, you did reference the 400 f/2.8 MK 1. Just keep in mind, that was a beast of a lens at 5.4 Kg. The newer versions are much lighter. Personally, I would avoid the Mk1 due to weight. The 400 f/2.8 Mk 2 is 3.9Kg, and the MK 3 is 2.84 Kgs. The 200-400 f/4 is 3.6Kgs.

There is a very detailed review of options.

You are young enough and I assume into photography enough, I would not consider this a "once" in a lifetime decision. So, think about kit construction.
 

Codebunny

Elil
Sep 5, 2018
801
806
Scotland
I don't understand about the 480mm-300mm thing. You usually just frame with a zoom rather than look at the focal length. Nikon is a peculiar company, it gets some things better than anyone else, like the D500 and D850 and its PF lenses are a joy, but it's weak on zooms. Some Nikon wild-life photographers are using the Z50 as a back up as it has faster focussing and a very nice sensor.

I am referring to the crop factor. For instance I was far more in love with my 300mm f/2.8 when it was on a 7d and that was down to the extra reach and AF speed on that camera. I don't intend to buy a crop camera when I buy a big white, so I want to see what focal length I am going to use. Say if I never have the lens below 500mm, well then I would not buy a 200-400, I would buy a 500 or 600mm.
 

Codebunny

Elil
Sep 5, 2018
801
806
Scotland
First off, congratulations.

My quick answer is going to be 200-400 +1.4xTC for the flexibility of the zoom (and built in TC) and amazing IQ. In my mind, primes are all about specific purposes, I would only get the 400 f/2.8 (are you think Mk 1, 2 or 3?) for one reason, bokeh. Really, it is subject isolation. I have heard the 400 f/2.8 II called one of the best bokeh lenses of all time. But, I personally, do not see many around because another factor usually wins out: More reach, 500/600 mm. More flexibility, 200-400 f/4.

Next, you did reference the 400 f/2.8 MK 1. Just keep in mind, that was a beast of a lens at 5.4 Kg. The newer versions are much lighter. Personally, I would avoid the Mk1 due to weight. The 400 f/2.8 Mk 2 is 3.9Kg, and the MK 3 is 2.84 Kgs. The 200-400 f/4 is 3.6Kgs.

There is a very detailed review of options.

You are young enough and I assume into photography enough, I would not consider this a "once" in a lifetime decision. So, think about kit construction.

It is still way at the top of my list, as I commented to a chap before, I'll be trying out the Nikon 200-500 to see what focal length I like(this is cheeper than renting each lens too boot) and then I'll be buying new the focal length I love and a nice 1DX or R1 to shove on it.

Regarding my age, I am indeed only approaching 35. However, my sell by date was before 25 until all that fun radio therapy. But that nasty little stone in my head can come back with a vengeance at any point or trigger another epileptic episode. So this is on my bucket list while I have a good income and am alive and kicking.
 

SteveC

R5
CR Pro
Sep 3, 2019
2,246
2,119
I am referring to the crop factor. For instance I was far more in love with my 300mm f/2.8 when it was on a 7d and that was down to the extra reach and AF speed on that camera. I don't intend to buy a crop camera when I buy a big white, so I want to see what focal length I am going to use. Say if I never have the lens below 500mm, well then I would not buy a 200-400, I would buy a 500 or 600mm.

I've never shot a full frame, so crop is "normal" to me. When I shoot 100mm on a Rebel or M body, I get a certain result. That's the field of view 100mm means to me.

So when I switch to the R series, that same lens will suddenly become a 62.5mm equivalent, based on what I am used to.
 

AlanF

Stay at home
CR Pro
Aug 16, 2012
8,041
9,612
It is still way at the top of my list, as I commented to a chap before, I'll be trying out the Nikon 200-500 to see what focal length I like(this is cheeper than renting each lens too boot) and then I'll be buying new the focal length I love and a nice 1DX or R1 to shove on it.

Regarding my age, I am indeed only approaching 35. However, my sell by date was before 25 until all that fun radio therapy. But that nasty little stone in my head can come back with a vengeance at any point or trigger another epileptic episode. So this is on my bucket list while I have a good income and am alive and kicking.
Get your new lens and camera and enjoy them!
 

Codebunny

Elil
Sep 5, 2018
801
806
Scotland
I've never shot a full frame, so crop is "normal" to me. When I shoot 100mm on a Rebel or M body, I get a certain result. That's the field of view 100mm means to me.

So when I switch to the R series, that same lens will suddenly become a 62.5mm equivalent, based on what I am used to.

I fell in love with my 300mm on a 7d but promptly fell in love with full frame cameras. So that it was like going from 500mm to 300mm, but with much better pictures.
 
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