Canon Lens Rumors

Here is the official marketing material for the Canon RF 16mm f/2.8 STM, Canon RF 100-400mm f/5.6-8 IS USM and accessories

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Below is the official marketing material for the upcoming Canon RF 16mm f/2.8 STM, Canon RF 100-400mm f/5.6-8 IS USM and accessories that will be announced tomorrow.

Canon RF 16mm f/2.8 STM

Compact, versatile, speedy, and affordable, the new RF16mm F2.8 STM lens is a terrific complement to any EOS R series digital camera. Offering an ultra-wide angle of view and a bright f/2.8 aperture, it’s an excellent choice whether taking interior photos in tight spaces, seeking out the perfect landscape or as the perfect webcam lens when used in combination with an EOS camera and EOS Webcam Utility on a video call.

With a 16mm F2.8 lens, you can experiment with enhancing perspectives, capturing starscapes, or with the close focusing distance of 13cm, get up close to your subject while still keeping the background more visible. Video users will find this ultra-wide lens a natural for vlogging, especially with its supremely lightweight.

With its remarkable combination of optical excellence and refined performance, all in a small package that’s easy to bring most anywhere, the RF16mm F2.8 STM is a stellar companion to any EOS R series digital
camera.

Canon RF 100-400mm f/5.6-8 IS USM

Perfect for wildlife, sports, travel, and more, the RF100-400mm F5.6-8 IS USM is a compact, lightweight telephoto lens for EOS R Series cameras, offering a versatile zoom range that brings subjects closer with ease. The RF100-400mm F5.6-8 IS USM is similar in size to the EF 70-300mm F4.5-5.6 IS II USM lens, but not only reaches 400mm, but also has fast Nano USM focusing and up to 6 stops of Coordinated IS when used in combination with an EOS R series camera featuring In-body Image Stabilization like the EOS R5 and EOS R6, or 5.5 stops with an EOS R/RP camera.

Using a single Ultra-Low Dispersion lens element towards the front of the lens group corrects chromatic aberration throughout the entire zoom range, making your images look crisp and colorful with minimal color blur. The RF100-400mm F5.6-8 IS USM lens can also accept both the RF1.4x and RF2x tele extenders giving you the effective maximum focal length of 560mm
and 800mm respectively. With a control ring that allows for quick setting changes, including shutter speed and aperture, the RF100-400mm F5.6-8 IS USM lens puts quality, convenience, and control in your hands.

Canon DM-E1D

The Stereo Microphone DM-E1D is a compact microphone accessory for compatible EOS cameras that include the multi-function shoe. The Stereo Microphone DM-E1D easily mounts to the multifunction Hotshoe creating a digital connection to the camera. This means that no internal battery or cable connecting the mic to the camera’s mic port is required, helping you utilize the mic longer and also no impediment in using the vari-angle screen to its full range. It features a number of directional controls to suit the environment and your shooting needs.

Shotgun mode keeps audio focused on a subject directly in front of the camera, such as when interviewing someone for a documentary. Stereo (90°/120°) mode captures audio over a wide area for more ambient sound, ideal for nature scenes or entire orchestras. Adjusting the mic controls is as simple as pressing the menu button on the back of the microphone and using the touchscreen LCD on the back of the EOS camera to change settings. Whether you’re looking to capture an interview, record a concert or simply capture the sights and sounds of nature, the Stereo Microphone DM-E1D pairs wonderfully with a compatible EOS digital camera to help you achieve impressive audio.

Canon AD-E1

For a seamless transition from your current hot shoe accessories to the multi-function shoe, the Multi-Function Shoe Adapter AD-E1 is the answer. The Multi-Function Shoe Adapter AD-E1 provides a reliable connection for dust and drip-proof Speedlite accessories that you may already own such as the
Speedlite EL-1, Speedlite 600EX II-RT, Speedlite 600EX-RT, Speedlite 580EX II, ST-E3-RT or OC-E3 flash cord..The shoe adapter will also hold current accessories such as shotgun mics and on-camera LED panels securely to the camera body with dual locking pins on the multi-function shoe side.

Canon ST-E10

For wireless Speedlite setups requiring one or more off-camera flashes, the Speedlite Transmitter ST-E10 delivers a transmitter compatible with EOS cameras that include the multi-function shoe. Since this transmitter maintains a digital connection to the camera through the shoe, it does not require batteries, making the design approximately 30% smaller and approximately 50% lighter (than the ST-E3-RT II).

Controlling and changing the 5 independent groups across 15 Speedlites is as easy as pressing the menu button located on the transmitter and adjusting the settings from the vari angle touchscreen on the back of the camera, or with the flash setting screen when using the Canon Camera Connect app on your smartphone. With full flash control at your fingertips, the Speedlite Transmitter ST-E10 is an indispensable tool for advanced, professional flash photography.

May 13, 2021
3
1
It doesn't matter what they announce or when it's supposed to be available because they can't make enough of what everyone already wants . . .
 
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FrenchFry

Wildlife enthusiast!
Jun 14, 2020
441
552
I guess people loved adapting their EF lenses to the new RF mount SO MUCH that now they have the opportunity of adapting their old hot shoe accessories to the new hot shoe mount! (Must be a lucrative business model that keeps people buying new equipment so they don't have to adapt.)

I'm a bit shocked to see that the new multi-function shoe does not appear to be backwards compatible with Canon's existing speedlight transmitter (ST-E3-RT) and top of the line speedlights, such as the Speedlite EL-1?

The adapter AD-E1 won't be available until February of next year (per Nokishita), which kind of leaves people with the R3 a bit stranded from a flash perspective for several months, unless they buy the new ST-E10, which may or may not be possible to get at the same time as the R3 due to high demand and low availability.

Hopefully the silver lining from this is that Canon may develop some new flash units specifically with the multi-function shoe. The downside is that the new flashes would not work with older bodies (same dilemma as buying RF lenses for the R). I would love to see some smaller mid-grade flashes released with rechargeable lithium-ion batteries.

p.s. I hope I have mis-interpreted the lack of backwards compatibility. I've based my comments on the description for the AD-E1.
 
Last edited:

H. Jones

Photojournalist
Aug 1, 2014
731
1,429
I guess people loved adapting their EF lenses to the new RF mount SO MUCH that now they have the opportunity of adapting their old hot shoe accessories to the new hot shoe mount! (Must be a lucrative business model that keeps people buying new equipment so they don't have to adapt.)

I'm a bit shocked to see that the new multi-function shoe does not appear to be backwards compatible with Canon's existing speedlight transmitter (ST-E3-RT) and top of the line speedlights, such as the Speedlite EL-1?

The adapter AD-E1 won't be available until February of next year (per Nokishita), which kind of leaves people with the R3 a bit stranded from a flash perspective for several months, unless they buy the new ST-E10, which may or may not be possible to get at the same time as the R3 due to high demand and low availability.

Hopefully the silver lining from this is that Canon may develop some new flash units specifically with the multi-function shoe. The downside is that the new flashes would not work with older bodies (same dilemma as buying RF lenses for the R). I would love to see some smaller mid-grade flashes released with rechargeable lithium-ion batteries.

At $39 dollars, it's not a massive purchase, but that is another surprise to find out the new hotshoe isn't compatible.

At that price, I would hazard a guess the adapter is probably a small piece of metal that locks into the multi-function shoe with a hotshoe on top of it, so hopefully that means that it won't be difficult to make and sell lots of.
 

FrenchFry

Wildlife enthusiast!
Jun 14, 2020
441
552
At $39 dollars, it's not a massive purchase, but that is another surprise to find out the new hotshoe isn't compatible.

At that price, I would hazard a guess the adapter is probably a small piece of metal that locks into the multi-function shoe with a hotshoe on top of it, so hopefully that means that it won't be difficult to make and sell lots of.
It's not the price I'm concerned with, but the lack of availability at launch. It not even being released until four months after the R3, and who knows how long it will take to be readily available.

Eventually some markets may choose to include the adapter with the R3, just like EF-RF adapters were included with some R body purchases. I would be a nice gesture that I don't expect to see in the US, but who knows? Special deal for those who pre-order like Canon Canada did for R5 preorders?

It's also disappointing to know that all of the hot shoe accessories we already own will not be natively compatible with the R3. If you forget your little adapter, you can't use your transmitters, speedlites, or microphones that day? It's convenient to have equipment that is natively compatible with all of your bodies, and adds redundancy or reduces risk.
 

neuroanatomist

I post too Much on Here!!
CR Pro
Jul 21, 2010
25,574
3,899
Hopefully the silver lining from this is that Canon may develop some new flash units specifically with the multi-function shoe.
The ST-E10 has no batteries, it draws power from the camera. The press release footnote about the blackout-free EVF states:

Blackout(s) may occur in some cases; such as when the built-in memory is full or when the flash battery is fully recharged after the battery ran out during continuous shooting.

So, perhaps equally powerful but smaller flashes because the smaller batteries that draw power from the body and are constantly being recharged. Or no battery and just a big capacitor to recharge.
 

FrenchFry

Wildlife enthusiast!
Jun 14, 2020
441
552
The ST-E10 has no batteries, it draws power from the camera. The press release footnote about the blackout-free EVF states:

Blackout(s) may occur in some cases; such as when the built-in memory is full or when the flash battery is fully recharged after the battery ran out during continuous shooting.

So, perhaps equally powerful but smaller flashes because the smaller batteries that draw power from the body and are constantly being recharged. Or no battery and just a big capacitor to recharge.
Yes, this would be really interesting! Hoping to hear about these potential advantages tomorrow.
 

BakaBokeh

EOS 90D
CR Pro
May 16, 2020
198
427
I'm not mad at the backwards compatible hotshoe. I like the idea of advancing to a next gen technology. Just hope there continues to be adoption of it as a standard so we can have a plethora of new peripherals that can be powered by the camera and have better camera-device communication.
 
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H. Jones

Photojournalist
Aug 1, 2014
731
1,429
Still feels very bizarre that the lenses they're announcing alongside the R3 are both squarely consumer-grade. No fancy new L glass to shiny-up the announcement?
I think the point is for the R3 to drum up the hype and get eyes on it, and then give everyday people who can't afford the R3 something they *can* buy, a $300 or $650 lens, when they click on the news about a $6000 camera.


Off of that topic, I'm shocked I didn't think of the fact that the 16mm F/2.8 was probably part of their recent EOS Webcam push that they've done over the pandemic. It looks to be the *perfect* companion for a cheap RF mount camera to be used as a webcam, it's wide, it's fast, and it's cheap.
 

aceflibble

EOS RP
May 8, 2015
350
177
It's very telling that they even mention "minimal color blur" at all in the description of the 100-400. Usually they don't mention any kind of fringing other than to say it's been fully corrected; of course that rarely means wholly corrected and we always have to remember that what claims are made in any manufacturer's marketing text are always exaggerations. That they would acknowledge this lens has "minimal" fringing in their marketing speak means, by real world terms, fringing must be fairly strong. Which itself is not at all unexpected for a cheaper zoom lens which has prioritised size and price over optics, but it is surprising to see them feel their marketing had to pay lip service to it.

"Capturing starscapes" sounds promising. I'll still wait for the reviews. With the RF mount, Canon tends to cut corners sometimes and rely on digital distortion correction.
Given how small it is, distortion is a given, but worse for astro is that it will be extremely, extremely shocking if the 16mm has anything less than 3 stops of vignetting. Bear in mind much larger RF lenses have come out with corners and sides 4 stops darker than the center, and the nearest EF prime, the 20mm f/2.8, has over 4 stops of vignette even despite being a much larger lens and not going as wide. Even regardless of the potential distortion, the kind of strong vignette that Canon has always tolerated on its wide primes, and the increased vignetting they're tolerating on RF lenses, means most of this lens is going to be, what, t/5-5.6 on average across the frame; probably t/8 to the sides, maybe even close to t/11 in the deepest corners?



All-in-all, I still expect these two lenses to be perfectly servicable hobbyist lenses for anyone who wants or needs to prioritise size and cost over quality, but with every release it becomes increasingly clear that the standard for RF is going to be a heavily reliance on software correction for any non-L lens. The end result can still be fine—the Fuji XF line has hinged on opcodes and software for the last decade, and that system is perfectly good for most tasks—just nobody should be expecting corners to not be cut in the process.
 

aceflibble

EOS RP
May 8, 2015
350
177
Still feels very bizarre that the lenses they're announcing alongside the R3 are both squarely consumer-grade. No fancy new L glass to shiny-up the announcement?
The audience that actually buys cameras like the R3 already have the lenses they need and/or rent lenses on a per-job basis, anyway. These kinds of high-end, ultra-tough, full-time pro sports and news bodies are not the products which are designed to shift lenses. You'll get the occasional person owning a 24-70 and 70-200, maybe a few news shooters here and there who will buy a fast 50 or 35 as well, then all the sports shooters are just renting the EF 300, and either the EF or RF version of the 400 f/2.8 and, very rarely, the 600 f/4. And as Canon have already said, there's currently no real way to improve on the EF big whites, other than they made the RF adapter a permanent fixture on the 400 and 600 since those two lenses are just heavy enough thats ome of the pros weren't confident attaching them to the regular adapter. So with no lenses to improve (which was always expected since the mirrorless flange distance is totally irrelevant to super-tele design) and with most of this market either already owning or renting lenses, it doesn't matter to Canon if they announce this body next to a pro lens or not.

The bodies that are designed to shift lenses tend to be more like the 5 and 6-series, or in EF the biggest lens-seller was actually the xxD (e.g. 90D) line. It's been the same with Nikon for decades, too. These integrated grip sports & news bodies are sold on their durability, reliability, connectivity and speed; they're not bodies which really show off lenses well and their audience doesn't buy a large number of lenses in any case.