Industry News

Industry News: Fujifilm announces the GFX 100, a 102mp medium format camera

Press Release:

  • 100+ megapixel sensor in a 55mm diagonal length large format offers highest resolution in the history of mirrorless cameras
  • Fast, accurate autofocus with the world’s first phase detection system, 4K video capability, and in-body image stabilization in a large sensor format1.

Valhalla, New York, May 23, 2019 – FUJIFILM Holdings America Corporation today announced the upcoming release of its flagship GFX100 mirrorless digital camera, incorporating a newly-developed 102 megapixel (MP), 55mm diagonal length large format image sensor that is designed to deliver image clarity and capability previously unheard of in the photography and video industries.

The GFX100 features several ‘world firsts’ for a large format camera with an image sensor larger than the 35mm (full-frame) format: including its 102MP back-side illuminated sensor (BSI), in body image stabilization (IBIS) and on-board phase detection hybrid auto-focus (AF) with near 100% coverage. In addition to pioneering features, the GFX100 is fully equipped with Fujifilm’s unparalleled color reproduction technology and film simulations. Resulting from years of research and technological innovations, the GFX100 will provide photographers with exceedingly high-quality imagery and best-in-class camera responsiveness for filmmaking and photography in a simple-to-use large format system with a growing selection of lenses.

Preorder the Fujifilm GFX 100 at Adorama

Offering large-format video capability, the GFX100 is the world’s first mirrorless digital camera with an image sensor of this size to offer 4K, 30p video recording capability (4:2:2 10-bit). These groundbreaking features make the GFX100 a camera of unparalleled innovation and versatility, fulfilling photography’s intrinsic mission of capturing and recording precious moments that may never be repeated with the utmost image quality.

Resolution Redefined: World’s First 100 MP BSI CMOS Sensor in a Mirrorless Camera
The GFX100 pairs a newly-developed back-illuminated 102MP CMOS imaging sensor with Fujifilm’s blazingly fast X-Processor 4 processing engine to create a combination capable of outputting 16-bit images with amazing color fidelity, rich shadow detail, and incredible dynamic range. Its back-illuminated structure promotes crisp image quality by bringing the exposure plane in extremely close proximity to the color filter array, which results in ultra-low noise levels and a native ISO of ISO 100.

1. First for a camera with image sensors larger than the 35mm full-frame format

Noteworthy Stability When It Matters: World’s First Five-axis IBIS in a Camera Featuring an Image Sensor Bigger than the 35mm Format
High-resolution image sensors require high-level stability to ensure image sharpness. With built-in 5-axis image stabilization, GFX100 users are reassured that vibrations won’t interrupt the capture process. The function offers up to 5.5-stop image stabilization (when using the GF63mmF2.8 R WR lens)2. The entire shutter unit is suspended with four springs to minimize the effect of shutter shock. This dramatically broadens the scope of situations where a user can hand-hold the camera and still enjoy the world of 100MP+ ultra-high resolution, pushing the boundaries of photographic expression.

Practical Auto-Focus for Large Format: World’s First On-Board Phase Detection Hybrid AF with approximately 100% Coverage
Compared to traditional medium format digital systems, the GFX100 raises the bar in AF performance by utilizing phase detection pixels across the sensor to help photographers obtain focus wherever they choose to position their subjects in the frame. With 3.76 million phase detection pixels, at approximately 100% coverage, near perfect auto-focus performance with speed and accuracy is now a reality for photographers needing optimum performance in subject tracking, face/eye detection and low-contrast environments. The effect is particularly notable when using fast prime lenses, achieving speed improvement of up to 210% over the conventional contrast AF system used in GFX 50R.

Pushing Creative Boundaries for Filmmakers: Large Format Camera with 4K video at 30p
With a sensor size of 43.9mm x 32.9mm, the GFX100 supports filmmakers in achieving their creative visions. The new sensor and processor combination support 4K video recording at 30p with a unique cinematic look. It’s now a breeze to explore shallow depth-of-field, wide tonal reproducibility and extra high ISO sensitivity, producing high- quality video footage with detailed textures while reproducing three-dimensional definitions and even capturing the atmosphere of the scene. With the ability to apply Fujifilm’s highly respected Film Simulations (including ETERNA cinema film simulation mode), record in F-Log Rec 2020, and capture 4:2:2 10-bit uncompressed footage through the HDMI port, GFX100 should certainly be coming soon to a screen near you.

Preorder the Fujifilm GFX 100 at Adorama

Dust-resistant, Weather-resistant, Lightweight and Highly Robust Magnesium Alloy Body with Integrated Vertical Grip
Maximizing its use for even the toughest conditions, the GFX100 has weather sealing in 95 locations across the camera body and detachable EVF to ensure an exceptionally high level of dust and moisture resistance. Photographers will have the opportunity to capture moments in even the most remote locations as the GFX100 can maintain reliable operation even under tough natural conditions.

2. Based on CIPA standard. Pitch/yaw shake only. With GF63mmF2.8 R WR lens mounted.

Although it sports a large image sensor, the GFX100’s body is equivalent to that of a flagship 35mm full-frame DSLR camera in terms of dimensions (6.15” (W) x 6.44” (H) x 4.05” (D), measuring 1.93” at the thinnest part) and weight (approx. 3 lbs. including two batteries, memory card and EVF).

Designed for protection, the GFX100’s core imaging unit, consisting of the lens mount, image stabilization mechanism and image sensor, has been structured completely separate from the main body panels. This “double-structure” is designed to ensure a high level of precision and robustness while minimizing resolution degradation caused by external stress to the body. To maximize usability, the GFX100 incorporates a vertical grip, enabling effective use of in-body space.

Advanced Color Reproduction Technology, Delivering Astonishing Quality in Stills
The combination of the newly-developed image sensor and the fourth-generation X- Processor 4 processing engine means the camera supports the 16-bit RAW capture requested by many professional photographers seeking files that tolerate heavy post- processing. The GFX100 also features the newly-developed “Smooth Skin Effect” function, which automatically smooths the skin tone of the subjects, as is often performed in portraiture. It allows the photographer to skip a portion of post-processing work so that images captured with this function can be finished at an extremely high level of perfection, faster.

The GFX100 will be the flagship model of the GFX Series of mirrorless cameras, which have garnered strong praise from professional photographers and photo enthusiasts for their use of 55mm large format image sensor, measuring 55mm diagonally (43.8mm x 32.9mm) and providing approximately 1.7 times the area of the regular 35mm full-frame sensor.

The GFX100 digital camera body will be available on June 30, 2019 at a suggested retail price of USD $9,999.95 and CAD $13,299.99.

Preorder the Fujifilm GFX 100 at Adorama

Mt Spokane Photography

I post too Much on Here!!
Mar 25, 2011
15,557
775
As many have commented, 102 mp not 120. We are going to see standard 35mm sized sensors near 100 mp soon, the cost of a complete system for medium format sensor cameras is out of my range.
 

Kit Lens Jockey

EOS 7D MK II
Nov 12, 2016
542
201
First, it still bugs me that they call this "medium format" when as far as I know it's not as big of a sensor as what most people think of as a medium format. Yes it's way cheaper, but we need a better naming convention rather than lumping anything bigger than full frame into the same "medium format" bin.

Also, what on earth is going on with the ISO specs? Maximum native ISO is 12,800, but expandable to 102,400? :LOL:

So natively they feel that it can only go to 12,800, but they will let you push it to ten times that? Something is a little weird here.

And also, what is the point of having such a big sensor if it will only achieve similar ISOs to what a good full frame sensor will?
 
  • Like
Reactions: Yakodzun

Graphic.Artifacts

EOS 7D MK II
Aug 1, 2017
467
271
35mm cameras are "small format". :) Odd to me that 35mm users who insist on calling their cameras "full frame" have a problem with larger format cameras being called "Medium format".

For Video shooters the sensor would actually fit very comfortably in the "large format" range.

The legacy film categories were never clearly defined to begin with. IMO you shouldn't have too much trouble finding something more important to worry about.
 

Kit Lens Jockey

EOS 7D MK II
Nov 12, 2016
542
201
You misunderstood me. I have no problem with the term medium format, just the fact that any camera larger than full frame gets lumped into the category of "medium format".

When I think of a true medium format digital camera, I'm thinking of something like a Hasselblad H6D. And these Fuji "medium format" sensors are a far cry from that size sensor.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Yakodzun

Graphic.Artifacts

EOS 7D MK II
Aug 1, 2017
467
271
This camera comfortably exceeds my needs, talent and budget by a wide margin but I think it represents a significant technical milestone for mirrorless. If some of this tech trickles down into a GFX 50R II in a couple years I might bite. I always get burned when I buy first gen models.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Besisika

Kit Lens Jockey

EOS 7D MK II
Nov 12, 2016
542
201
I just don't see what all the fuss is about. The ISO range is certainly not blowing anyone's socks off. They have no lenses faster than f2, and most only at f2.8 or f4, so you aren't getting better light gathering ability there.

Yeah it has 100mp, but as has been said we're close to that with full frame.

What about this camera is that ground breaking beyond being able to say you have a sensor larger than full frame?
 

Graphic.Artifacts

EOS 7D MK II
Aug 1, 2017
467
271
You misunderstood me. I have no problem with the term medium format, just the fact that any camera larger than full frame gets lumped into the category of "medium format".

When I think of a true medium format digital camera, I'm thinking of something like a Hasselblad H6D. And these Fuji "medium format" sensors are a far cry from that size sensor.
The Hassy H6D sensor has less than 1/4 the area of my 6x17 "medium format" roll film back so why is that "true" medium format. If you don't see how pointless this discussion is I don't know what to tell you. The GFX is optimized for max sensor size in a reasonably hand-holdable format.

If these were the specs for a Canon 1DS Mark IV I expect there are posters here that could barely maintain their continence.
 

Kit Lens Jockey

EOS 7D MK II
Nov 12, 2016
542
201
Well if you're going to compare film to a digital sensor, then I don't know what to tell you either.

If we're talking about a medium format digital camera, cameras like Hasselblads and Phase Ones are what have defined that segment for years if not decades. So when Fuji suddenly comes out with with a camera that has a sensor that is nowhere near the size of those sensors, it's just misleading to call it medium format. I don't think it's necessarily Fuji's fault, but I do think the industry as a whole needs to define sensor sizes better if there are going to be multiple sizes larger than full frame.
 

bhf3737

---
Sep 9, 2015
480
518
Calgary, Canada
www.flickr.com
Table below is the sensor size comparison of various format digital cameras.
It seems that currently anything larger than FF (even with different aspect ratio) is called medium format. Is this right or wrong, no one knows, I guess.

TypeHeight
(mm)
Width
(mm)
Diagonal
(mm)
Area (Resolution)
(Sq mm)
35mm Multiplier
1"9.6012.8016.00122.882.70
4/313.5018.0022.50243.001.92
APS-C Canon15.0022.5027.04337.501.60
APS-H Canon 1d18.7028.1033.75525.471.28
35mm Full Frame24.0036.0043.27864.001.00
Pentax 645z
Fujifilm GFX
33.0044.0055.001452.000.79
Hasselblad H5D-5036.7049.1061.301801.970.71
Hasselblad H5D-6040.2053.7067.082158.740.64
 

Kit.

EOS 6D MK II
Apr 25, 2011
1,419
799
The GFX is optimized for max sensor size in a reasonably hand-holdable format.
I don't see the point of it. For film cameras, due to film's inherent grain structure, it would have made some sense. For digital, one should optimize for max reasonably handholdable lens entrance pupil.
 

Graphic.Artifacts

EOS 7D MK II
Aug 1, 2017
467
271
The Hasselblad "Medium Format" mirrorless X1D also uses a 33x44 sensor for those that are keeping score.

I guess we might see an X1D II with this 102 MP sensor at some point. It's rumored to be in development.
 
Last edited:

bgoyette

EOS T7i
Feb 6, 2015
94
41
Well if you're going to compare film to a digital sensor, then I don't know what to tell you either.

If we're talking about a medium format digital camera, cameras like Hasselblads and Phase Ones are what have defined that segment for years if not decades. So when Fuji suddenly comes out with with a camera that has a sensor that is nowhere near the size of those sensors, it's just misleading to call it medium format. I don't think it's necessarily Fuji's fault, but I do think the industry as a whole needs to define sensor sizes better if there are going to be multiple sizes larger than full frame.
Hasselblad, (and for that matter, Phase One) has, since the H3d, made medium format digital cameras with a range of sensor sizes from 33x44 on up to 40x53mm (the h5d-50 in the chart was the older ccd version. The CMOS version (H5d-50c) was a 33x44. Medium format has always referred to range of roll film cameras, and later digital cameras with a frame size larger than 24x36mm, and smaller than typical cut sheet film that came in 4x5 and up. Can we not have this discussion anymore?...it's pointless. Medium format is no more accurate a descriptor than "full frame" is, yet it's what we have, and we all know what it means.
 

crazyrunner33

EOS RP
Nov 4, 2011
266
80
First, it still bugs me that they call this "medium format" when as far as I know it's not as big of a sensor as what most people think of as a medium format. Yes it's way cheaper, but we need a better naming convention rather than lumping anything bigger than full frame into the same "medium format" bin.

Also, what on earth is going on with the ISO specs? Maximum native ISO is 12,800, but expandable to 102,400? :LOL:

So natively they feel that it can only go to 12,800, but they will let you push it to ten times that? Something is a little weird here.

And also, what is the point of having such a big sensor if it will only achieve similar ISOs to what a good full frame sensor will?
ISO invariance. Wait to bash the low light performance after shadow recovery has been tested. More likely than not, this camera will probably outperform the A7S II and A7III in low light.
 

Graphic.Artifacts

EOS 7D MK II
Aug 1, 2017
467
271
Looks great, but not for ten grand. (At least not for mere mortals like me).

Can someone explain in very simple terms what a back-side illuminated sensor is and why it is beneficial?
As I understand it, A back-side illuminated sensor has the electronic layer of the sensor (front-side) flipped over to the back. The photo-diode (back-side) is then, of course, flipped to the front (light gathering side).

This gives a clearer path to the light gathering part of the sensor so the senor collects more photons. The more efficient light collection means that the sensors can support smaller pixels with less noise in low light. At least that's what proponents of BSI sensors say. I guess not everybody agrees on that part. Go figure.

I'm no expert on sensors but I think that's about it.
 
Last edited:
I wonder what the ergonomics are like on this camera? Based on appearance only, the GFX 50S looks like it is nicer to hold (and the GFX 50R looks too small), but I am only going by what it looks like in pictures. In fact Leica S looks like the best "medium format" camera ergonomically, but it's twenty grand for a 37MP sensor - no thanks!
 

RayValdez360

EOS 7D MK II
Jun 6, 2012
431
187
Table below is the sensor size comparison of various format digital cameras.
It seems that currently anything larger than FF (even with different aspect ratio) is called medium format. Is this right or wrong, no one knows, I guess.

TypeHeight
(mm)
Width
(mm)
Diagonal
(mm)
Area (Resolution)
(Sq mm)
35mm Multiplier
1"9.6012.8016.00122.882.70
4/313.5018.0022.50243.001.92
APS-C Canon15.0022.5027.04337.501.60
APS-H Canon 1d18.7028.1033.75525.471.28
35mm Full Frame24.0036.0043.27864.001.00
Pentax 645z
Fujifilm GFX
33.0044.0055.001452.000.79
Hasselblad H5D-5036.7049.1061.301801.970.71
Hasselblad H5D-6040.2053.7067.082158.740.64
the thing is who should give a damn. the images are good and the larger size seems to have a advantage over 35mm currently.
 

bhf3737

---
Sep 9, 2015
480
518
Calgary, Canada
www.flickr.com
the thing is who should give a damn. the images are good and the larger size seems to have a advantage over 35mm currently.
Some may look at spec, some may look at the pictures taken, some may look at the price point, and some may look at all. Nothing wrong or damn there. One of the posters was asking whether just saying "larger than FF" (i.e. medium format) is a good term representing a whole range of sensor size (and aspect ratio) that is out there. Perhaps for you it is and perhaps for some others it is not. Nothing damn there either.
 

Yakodzun

I'm New Here
Aug 28, 2018
17
5
Well, as Phase One IQ3 owner I hope the game in Medium Format will be tough like in 35mm full frame segment. Stupid and slow autofocus, quantity of focus points, heavy weight, weird live view, interface - someone have to change it!