TOKYO – Nikon Corporation (Nikon) is pleased to announce the release of the NIKKOR Z 135mm f/1.8 S Plena, a mid-telephoto prime lens that is compatible with full-frame/FX-format mirrorless cameras for which the Nikon Z mount has been adopted.

The NIKKOR Z 135mm f/1.8 S Plena is an S-Line* lens, and takes full advantage of the Z mount system's large-diameter mount that unlocks further possibilities for lens design, as well as the potential for large and consistent distribution of light. This realizes beautiful, well-rounded bokeh throughout the entire frame even at maximum aperture, and outstanding sharpness and clarity regardless of the shooting distance — resulting in the fantastic expression of delicate textures and beautiful bokeh in both portraits and landscapes.

The lens' exterior design is intended to match its superior optical performance. The metal lens barrel features an engraved “Plena” logo, using the same yellow, cursive font as the NIKKOR Z 58mm f/0.95 S Noct. The name “Plena” is derived from the term plenum, which denotes the state of a space being completely full, and adopted to reflect the lens' ability to support the user's creative vision with beautiful, well-rounded bokeh of outstanding sharpness and clarity. Following in the footsteps of the NIKKOR Z 58mm f/0.95 S Noct, the NIKKOR Z 135mm f/1.8 S Plena has been bestowed with a unique name in the hopes that it will be treasured by users for many years to come.

Nikon will continue to pursue a new dimension in optical performance while meeting users' needs, contributing to the development of imaging culture, with the hope of expanding possibilities for imaging expression.

Nikon NIKKOR Z 135mm f/1.8 S Plena $2496

Primary features

  • Beautiful, well-rounded bokeh is achieved throughout the entire frame, while also supporting a fast f/1.8 maximum aperture. Fantastic expression that accentuates the three-dimensionality of the subject is achieved through the smooth gradation of bokeh that expands largely in front of and behind the focal plane, and the minimal color fringing of the bokeh.
  • The large amount of peripheral light at f/1.8 maximum aperture ensures a consistently bright image all the way to the edges of the frame, for a sense of transparency and brilliance in images.
  • With the outstanding sharpness and clarity distinct to S-Line lenses, the NIKKOR Z 135mm f/1.8 S Plena expresses the delicate textures in hair and skin, while top-class point-image reproduction capability achieves thorough rendering of night landscapes.
  • Adoption of a multi-focusing system*1 that uses stepping motors (STMs) realizes fast, accurate, and quiet AF drive, and enables accurate focusing, even at maximum aperture, for still images and video.
  • In addition to Meso Amorphous Coat, the most effective anti-reflection coating in Nikon history that prevents reflections regardless of the direction from which light enters the lens, Nikon's original ARNEO Coat is also used to effectively reduce ghosts and flares.
  • Its premium design, which includes an engraved “Plena” logo on the metal lens barrel, offers a sense of sophistication.
  • A design that takes video recording into consideration with quiet operation and stable exposure, as well as functions including focus-breathing suppression*2 that effectively reduces shifting of the angle of view when focusing.
  • Two lens Fn buttons, to which a wide variety of functions can be assigned, are adopted. One is positioned on the top of the lens, enabling smooth adjustment of settings even when shooting in vertical orientation.
  • The versatile 82-mm filter-attachment size enables the use of various lens filters designed to satisfy users' creative intent.
  • Designed to achieve superior dust- and drip-resistant performance*3, and equipped with an electromagnetic diaphragm mechanism for stable aperture control during high-speed continuous shooting.

Purchase Options

Nikon NIKKOR Z 135mm f/1.8 S Plena $2496

Go to discussion...

25 comments

  1. Nikon really haven't thought their branding through....this name "Plena" in Czech means Full Diaper....regardless of how good this lens is....it's going to have an uphill (or rather a downhill?) marketing task in most European countries.
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  2. Nikon really haven't thought their branding through....this name "Plena" in Czech means Full Diaper....regardless of how good this lens is....it's going to have an uphill (or rather a downhill?) marketing task in most European countries.
    View attachment 211856
    Plena in most European languages comes from the Latin Plenus, meaning full or complete, with nothing to do with a nappy (in my part of the UK we don't use the word diaper). In Russian, пле́нум, plenary comes from the same source, plenus. Plenary lectures don't have the speaker or audience in nappies.
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  3. Nikon really haven't thought their branding through....this name "Plena" in Czech means Full Diaper....regardless of how good this lens is....it's going to have an uphill (or rather a downhill?) marketing task in most European countries.
    View attachment 211856
    Do you mean this lens could be crappy? :LOL:
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  4. I would like to see this lens compared to the Canon.
    The Canon seems superior in every way except bokeh.
    The back of the Nikon lens is circular, early test show no cats eye bokeh balls and no vignetting, but Nikon forced reviewers to use jpegs. So the vignetting could be severe when using RAW.
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  5. The back of the Nikon lens is circular, early test show no cats eye bokeh balls and no vignetting, but Nikon forced reviewers to use jpegs. So the vignetting could be severe when using RAW.
    Forcing the jpgs doesn't seem good. I'd really like Nikon to do well.
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  6. Forcing the jpgs doesn't seem good. I'd really like Nikon to do well.
    Me too! Still in love with the F2...
    I'd rather have Nikon as Nr. 2, instead of Sony. And no more Youtube-driven competition, but a factual one.
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  7. The back of the Nikon lens is circular, early test show no cats eye bokeh balls and no vignetting, but Nikon forced reviewers to use jpegs. So the vignetting could be severe when using RAW.
    If there is no cat's eye bokeh, then I expect vignetting to be low. Often these are correlated.
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  8. "...it's going to have an uphill (or rather a downhill?) marketing task in most European countries."
    I didn't know most European countries speak Czech.
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  9. Nikon really haven't thought their branding through....this name "Plena" in Czech means Full Diaper....regardless of how good this lens is....it's going to have an uphill (or rather a downhill?) marketing task in most European countries.
    View attachment 211856
    Why would one Czech translation ruin its sales in the whole Europe ? Ridiculous comment. For me they could name it whatever they want and I would still buy it if performance is there.
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  10. I would like to see this lens compared to the Canon.
    The Canon seems superior in every way except bokeh.
    I don't need any comparison, I just use the RF 135 to be happy ....
    - The AF is a beast to say at least
    - the lightest lens ever used with a "tripod integrated" for long shutter speed - impressive IS.
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  11. The back of the Nikon lens is circular, early test show no cats eye bokeh balls and no vignetting, but Nikon forced reviewers to use jpegs. So the vignetting could be severe when using RAW.
    Cat eye bokeh balls are generated anywhere in the middle of the lens due to limited diameters of some elements, not at the rear element.
    Bigger elements give more weight, size, possibly worse CA and less performant AF & IS.
    BTW:
    - The RF135 is as round at the rear as at the front ....
    - I do not expect the Nikon 135 to have significant vignetting
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  12. I'm consistently impressed with the new RF 135L. The autofocus is lightning fast for sports/action - unlike the Nikon. So I honestly couldn't care less. All my complaints with the original EF 135L (straight aperture, chromatic aberration, minimum focusing distance, etc.) have all been rectified. So I'm happy with the route Canon took.
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  13. I'm consistently impressed with the new RF 135L. The autofocus is lightning fast for sports/action - unlike the Nikon. So I honestly couldn't care less. All my complaints with the original EF 135L (straight aperture, chromatic aberration, minimum focusing distance, etc.) have all been rectified. So I'm happy with the route Canon took.
    I was generally happy with the EF 135/2, but used it much less after getting the 70-200/2.8 II and so sold it. I fear it would be the same with the 135/1.8, though I am considering getting the TS-E 135/4 before they disappear.
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  14. I'm consistently impressed with the new RF 135L. The autofocus is lightning fast for sports/action - unlike the Nikon. So I honestly couldn't care less. All my complaints with the original EF 135L (straight aperture, chromatic aberration, minimum focusing distance, etc.) have all been rectified. So I'm happy with the route Canon took.
    I was able to test out the lens at a demo event. The af speed was impressive and no different than my RF 135. I think it’ll hold up well for sporting events. Not sure why there’s so many assumptions when the lens that hasn’t even hit market yet.
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  15. I was able to test out the lens at a demo event. The af speed was impressive and no different than my RF 135. I think it’ll hold up well for sporting events. Not sure why there’s so many assumptions when the lens that hasn’t even hit market yet.
    Probably because the fanboys are doing what they use to do without engaging that many brain cells. It's just easier: "I don't need any comparison, I just use the RF 135 to be happy ...." :rolleyes:. BTW I'm not trying to troll (I don't use to!) - I'm trying to put some reason in the comments.
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