Partially stacked sensor seems like an odd term for this, but then again, I'm not Nikon Marketing. I'd love to see this layout as it claims there are circuits ABOVE the photodiodes, something that doesn't seem to make a lot of sense for efficiency. So I'm really curious about how this performs and not to mention, why they decided on this architecture.

Nikon Z6 III Features

  • 24.5MP Partially-Stacked CMOS Sensor
  • EXPEED 7 Image Processor
  • 6K 60p N-RAW, 6K 30p ProRes RAW
  • 4K 120p, Full HD 240p Slow Motion Video
  • Up to 20 fps Raw, 60 fps JPEG Shooting
  • Blackout-Free, 5760k-Dot EVF
  • 493-Point AF, AI-Based Subject Detection
  • 3.2″ 4-Axis Tilting Touchscreen LCD
  • CFx Type B & SD Memory Card Slots
  • Camera-to-Cloud Direct Connectivity

Preorder Options

Nikon's Press Release is below

World’s First Partially-Stacked CMOS Sensor1 Gives Photographers & Filmmakers Flagship-Level Performance; Nikon Also Announces Nikon Imaging Cloud Online Service & Curated Image Recipes

Today Nikon announced the Z6III, a 24.5MP full-frame mirrorless camera that stands in a class of its own with an unmatched suite of powerful features that bring exceptional performance to both photographers and filmmakers. The Z6III is the world’s first camera with a partially-stacked CMOS sensor, delivering ultra-fast readout that unlocks blistering speeds and high frame rates in both photo and video modes. Other benefits include a truly immersive viewfinder experience with the brightest EVF of any mirrorless camera,1 and a wide range of pro-level features inherited from Nikon’s acclaimed Z8 and Z9 flagship cameras.

The combination of the Z6III’s unique new sensor design and EXPEED 7 image processing engine results in an approximately 3.5x increase to readout speed compared to the previous-generation Z6II. This unlocks enhanced performance across the board, enabling benefits such as 6K internal N-RAW and ProRes RAW video, Full HD video up to 240p, and rapid continuous shooting of stills up to 120 fps with Pre-Release Capture. However, the camera’s incredible performance goes far beyond just frame rates. The Z6III features an impressively fast AF system inherited from the Z8 and Z9, which includes highly advanced multi-subject detection with the speed and accuracy needed for maximum confidence.

  • World's first partially-stacked sensor: The Z6III is the first mirrorless camera to adopt this new sensor architecture, which features multiple high-speed processing circuits stacked in layers above and below the imaging area of the sensor. The high-speed readout made possible by this new sensor in combination with the same EXPEED 7 processing engine as the Z8 and Z9 enables a range of powerful features.
  • Upgraded autofocus: AF is fast and accurate, clocking in at a full 20% faster than the Z6II. In challenging light, the AF detection range has been extended to an incredible −10 EV2, superior even to the flagship level cameras. This enhanced sensitivity makes it easier to focus in dark situations like nighttime sports or an event reception.
  • Advanced subject detection: The Z6III draws on the advanced subject-detection technology of the Z8 and Z9 to automatically detect nine subject types, including people, animals and various vehicles. Users can lock onto these subjects with advanced AF modes including 3D-tracking, Auto-area AF, Wide-area AF and Dynamic-area AF. Custom wide-area AF patterns allows for the detection and tracking of subjects within a custom designated area.
  • Pre-Release Capture up to 120 fps: This powerful feature enables photographers to capture shots that might have otherwise been missed, such as the moment a bird takes flight, a lightning strike or the game-winning goal. A half-press of the shutter-release button starts buffering images3, and when the shutter is pressed all the way, the Z6III saves images taken up to one second prior.
  • Internal 6K RAW video: The Z6III is capable of capturing 12-bit 6K/60p N-RAW and 6K/30p ProRes RAW, as well as 10-bit 5.4K ProRes 422 and H.265 video formats. The ability to capture super high-resolution video footage affords filmmakers the freedom to crop, trim, track and stabilize a 4K timeline in post with ultimate clarity. Furthermore, filmmakers can take advantage of the Z6III’s maximum video resolution of 6K to create oversampled 4K UHD/60p video footage4. The Z6III’s efficient heat-dissipating design allows continuous 4K UHD/60p recording for up to 125 min.5
  • Brightest EVF of any mirrorless camera: At up to 4,000 cd/m2 (nits), the Z6III’s 5,760k-dot electronic viewfinder is the brightest ever in a mirrorless camera, delivering a clear, detailed view even in extremely bright outdoor situations while minimizing viewfinder blackout. In addition to its class-leading brightness and high resolution, the Z6III’s EVF is the first in a mirrorless camera to support a DCI-P3 equivalent color gamut1, which enables photographers and filmmakers to see a more lifelike display of colors.
  • Dynamic Full HD/240p slow motion: The Z6III can capture dramatic slow-motion footage up to 10× with 10-bit Full HD/240p H.265 video recording.
  • Amazing low-light ability- The Z6III’s wide native ISO range is from 100-64,000 (51,200 in video) and is expandable to 204,800 for ultra-low-light shooting. The Z6III’s EXPEED 7 image processing engine enables tailored noise reduction, effectively minimizing grainy noise in flat areas of the image while preserving fine details in subjects such as buildings. This results in sharper, clearer images in low-light environments.
  • 8.0 stop Vibration Reduction6: Built-in 5-axis image stabilization delivers up to 8.0 stops of Vibration Reduction, empowering photographers and filmmakers to shoot handheld with confidence. Enjoy the creative freedom of slower shutter speeds, while keeping subjects sharp and using lower ISOs. Additionally, the Z6III features Focus Point VR7, which prioritizes stabilization on the active focus point.
  • Vari-angle LCD screen: The 3.2” rear LCD touchscreen can be used as a front-facing screen for video production and self-recording, as well as framing at a low angle.
  • High-resolution Pixel Shift mode: In Pixel-shift mode, the Z6III’s sensor is subtly shifted across 4, 8, 16, or 32 exposures, for increased color and detail with an incredibly high resolution of up to approx. 96MP.8
  • Z8-level build quality: The Z6III is constructed from magnesium alloy and Sereebo® material for maximum durability and light weight. Weighing only 1.67 lbs. with a battery and memory card, the Z6III is sealed against dust and moisture to the same level as the Z8, and is rated for operation down to 14°F/−10°C, making it suitable for use in a wide variety of environments and conditions.
  • Flexible Color Picture Controls: The Z6III supports the new Flexible Color Picture Control feature in NX Studio.9 Z6III owners can use the software’s powerful Color Blender and Color Grading features to create custom presets that can be uploaded to the camera as Custom Picture Controls.
  • NEW NIKON IMAGING CLOUD
  • Nikon Imaging Cloud10 will be a new complimentary cloud service that expands connectivity and creative options for Z6III owners.11 Users will be able to browse a suite of curated Imaging Recipes courtesy of Nikon and selected creators, which provide all the ingredients necessary to create amazing images: Suggested camera settings, inspiring insights plus Cloud Picture Control presets that Z6III owners can download straight to their camera. Furthermore, when the Z6III is connected to Nikon Imaging Cloud via Wi-Fi, still images captured with the camera can be automatically uploaded to a range of popular cloud storage services including NIKON IMAGE SPACE, making the storage and sharing of images even more convenient. In addition, Z6III owners will be able to use Nikon Imaging Cloud to keep their camera’s firmware up to date automatically over Wi-Fi, avoiding the need to manually download and install via a memory card.12

NEW MB-N14 POWER BATTERY PACK

The MB-N14 (release scheduled for Summer 2024) is an optional power battery pack with an integrated shutter button for the Z6III, Z7II and Z6II. The MB-N14 can hold two EN-EL15c13 rechargeable Li-ion batteries, allowing users to record approximately 1.9× more stills and extend video shoots.14 In addition to offering the same dust and drip resistance as the Z6III, the MB-N14 can also be used in conditions as cold as −10°C/14°F, making it extremely useful when shooting for extended periods of time in harsh conditions. What’s more, the MB-N14 is a “hot swap” power battery pack that continues to supply power even when one of the two batteries is removed. A built-in USB connector enables batteries inserted in the MB-N14 to be charged even when the MB-N14 is not attached to the camera.15

PRICE AND AVAILABILITY

The new Nikon Z6III will be available in late June for a suggested retail price of $2,499.95* in the body-only configuration, or with the NIKKOR Z 24-70mm f/4 lens for $3,099.95.* The MB-N14 power battery pack will be available this summer for a suggested retail price of $359.95.* For more information about the latest Nikon products, including the vast collection of NIKKOR Z lenses and the entire line of Z series cameras, please visit Nikonusa.com.

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Go to discussion...

49 comments

  1. Nikon marketing says 'partially' stacking the sensor is a lot cheaper than 'fully' stacking it.

    But don't let that distract from the fact that it's 24MP, which is, according to newly registered accounts here, completely unsuited for photography!
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  2. But don't let that distract from the fact that it's 24MP, which is, according to newly registered accounts here, is completely unsuited for photography!
    Canon Nikon is Doomed!
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  3. Nikon was lacking a solid midfielder, especially a machine with top tier AF system. I would recommend old Nikon F folks upgrade to this or Z8. Just like Canon EF folks upgrade to R6/R6ii or R5/R5ii(soon™)

    There's little reasons to get Sony E mount system nowadays.
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  4. Or just use R5 sensor and retune. R5ii gets stacked
    R6 mkiii needs to match competitor for the market. Or they can put R5 sensor to R8 and still sell 1499.99usd.
    :D
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  5. Nikon marketing says 'partially' stacking the sensor is a lot cheaper than 'fully' stacking it.

    But don't let that distract from the fact that it's 24MP, which is, according to newly registered accounts here, completely unsuited for photography!

    it's such a weird term. Dual-Sided Stacked Sensor™ would have been my guess. but then again, I'm not Nikon.

    and clearly 24MP is so low resolution that even casual photographers would spurn it.
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  6. \'Circuits above the photodiodes\' - The diodes are \'small\' area-wise. Speculation: circuits beside the photodiodes that are under the microlenses.
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  7. Nikon was lacking a solid midfielder, especially a machine with top tier AF system. I would recommend old Nikon F folks upgrade to this or Z8. Just like Canon EF folks upgrade to R6/R6ii or R5/R5ii(soon™)

    There's little reasons to get Sony E mount system nowadays.

    Yeah I see this camera as a shot across the bow of Sony.

    Sony Camera division is phoning up the fab today....

    ezgif-6-272725c152.gif
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  8. \'Circuits above the photodiodes\' - The diodes are \'small\' area-wise. Speculation: circuits beside the photodiodes that are under the microlenses.

    that's lower efficiency though.

    that's why i want to see a whitepaper or something on it.
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  9. Then R6 mkiii has more chance to get R3 sensor now!
    You might be right. According to Nikon (on Petapixel): “Nikon says the “mid-range” market — think Canon EOS R6 Mark II, Sony a7 IV, and the Fujifilm X-T5 — is booming and comprises nearly 60% of all revenue in the interchangeable lens camera space and an even greater percentage of cameras on a per-unit basis.”
    If 60% of revenue is a correct number, this may be the reason why the R6 Mk II was released quite soon after the R6 and it might be a reason to put a stacked 24MP sensor in the successor of the R6 Mk II.
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  10. Nikon marketing says 'partially' stacking the sensor is a lot cheaper than 'fully' stacking it.

    But don't let that distract from the fact that it's 24MP, which is, according to newly registered accounts here, completely unsuited for photography!
    Who would need more than 24MP for wedding photography? Our R3 cameras are exceptional, and we don't see the need for more megapixels. Higher megapixel counts just mean more time spent downloading, sorting, and editing without any noticeable benefits for our work. Additionally, in my opinion, the R5 renders some of the worst skin tones of any camera we've ever used.
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  11. I am curious of what is really going on there regarding the \"semi-stacked sensor\". One thing I noticed is that in Nikon\'s official texts there is no mention of BSI (at least not that I could find), so I am now wondering if this is something similar that Canon has been doing with the R5 and R6ii sensors to get them quite fast.

    This Z6iii sensor is still twice as fast as the R6ii\'s though, as it allows a similar RS but while using 14 bit readout (vs 12 bit on the R6ii), so it\'s quite impressive. It makes me more optimistic about an R6iii with R3\'s sensor.
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  12. Nikon was lacking a solid midfielder, especially a machine with top tier AF system. I would recommend old Nikon F folks upgrade to this or Z8. Just like Canon EF folks upgrade to R6/R6ii or R5/R5ii(soon™)

    There's little reasons to get Sony E mount system nowadays.
    Nikon is lacking at the low end. Their 2019 Z50 hasn't been updated.
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  13. Nothing to do with the Z6III, but I've recently noticed that both Canon and Nikon USA's press releases both have "Melville, NY" as their respective locations. Turns out their USA HQs are less than a mile away from each other.

    1718646221787.png
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  14. I am curious of what is really going on there regarding the \"semi-stacked sensor\". One thing I noticed is that in Nikon\'s official texts there is no mention of BSI (at least not that I could find), so I am now wondering if this is something similar that Canon has been doing with the R5 and R6ii sensors to get them quite fast.

    This Z6iii sensor is still twice as fast as the R6ii\'s though, as it allows a similar RS but while using 14 bit readout (vs 12 bit on the R6ii), so it\'s quite impressive. It makes me more optimistic about an R6iii with R3\'s sensor.

    no, nothing similar according to the press release.

    dpreview talks a little about it, seems they built up on top of the sensor around the outside.

    I don't see the benefit it's not closer to the pixels, and it's still a 1/60th refresh rate in 14 bit mode. so it's not as if it's Z 9 speeds which was 1/270th.

    I guess there is cost associated with a stacked sensor - but it's a 2500 camera body.
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  15. Nothing to do with the Z6III, but I've recently noticed that both Canon and Nikon USA's press releases both have "Melville, NY" as their respective locations. Turns out their USA HQs are less than a mile away from each other.

    View attachment 217530

    sniper distances. things got real between those two. there is a history ;)
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