The Wetzlar Camera Auction, which usually takes place every October is one of the biggest and most prestigious auctions of its kind for collectors and camera/lens nerds.

Being that the auction takes place in Wetzlar, Germany, it's tends to be very Leica focused. Though, you do see some unique items from Canon, Nikon and others.

At last year's auction, the rare Canon FD 24mm f/1.4 SSC sold for €15,000. The SSC version is extremely rare, but even the L version of this lens, the FD 24mm f/1.4L can fetch a pretty penny.

Last year's top prize was the Leica MDa NASA Replica, which sold for €550,000 before the buyer premium.

This year's auction does have some interesting and likely more affordable Canon cameras and lenses available to bid on.

Canon Hansa (1938)

Estimate €6,000-€7,000

canonhansa 728x410 - The catalogue for the upcoming Wetzlar Camera Auction has been published. There are some Canon goodies available
https://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/158015922_canon-hansa

Canon Hansa with focusing mount No. 872, already without “Nippon Kogaku Tokyo” engraving. With original Nikkor 1:3.5/5 cm with black front with matching hand-scratched serial number 872 on the connection ring. Inside the base plate is engraved with number 2583


Canon M39 35mm f/1.5 (1971)

Estimate €4,000-€5,000

canon35f15 728x410 - The catalogue for the upcoming Wetzlar Camera Auction has been published. There are some Canon goodies available
https://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/158015933_canon-lens-35mm-f15

Very rare, third and last version, in good condition. This very late variant was only produced for a short period in 1971. The optics with minimal cloudiness and dust inclusions, slight traces of plaster and a small scratch on the front lens. Light oil coating on the aperture blades.


Canon FD 24mm f/1.4 L (1989)

Estimate €5,000-€6,000

canonfd2414 728x410 - The catalogue for the upcoming Wetzlar Camera Auction has been published. There are some Canon goodies available
https://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/158015983_canon-fd-24mm-f14-l

Sought-after wide-angle lens in very good condition. The optics with minimal turbidity in the rear lens element.


Canon M39 85mm f/1.5 (1955)

Estimate €6,000-€7,000

canon8515 728x410 - The catalogue for the upcoming Wetzlar Camera Auction has been published. There are some Canon goodies available
https://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/158015935_canon-lens-85mm-f15

Third version of this coveted portrait lens in very good condition, with original lens hood. The optics with minimal dust inclusions, small scratches behind the rear lens.


The most interesting Nikon lens available is the mammoth Nikon ED Nikkor 1200-1700mm f/5.6-8 P IF.

Nikon ED Nikkor 1200-1700mm f/5.6-8 P IF

Estimate €80,000-€100,000

nikon12001700 728x410 - The catalogue for the upcoming Wetzlar Camera Auction has been published. There are some Canon goodies available
https://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/158016009_nikon-ed-nikkor-1200-1700mm-f56-8-p-if

In May 1989, Nikon started developing the lens offered here as a “hold my beer” moment in response to the Canon EF 1200mm f/5.6L USM. The prototype was first used in 1990 at the Koshien Stadium in Amagasaki. In order to capture the athletes in the middle of the stadium from the press seats, focal lengths of 1200mm were required to catch the action and the 1700mm long end offered portrait opportunities. Nikon later delivered these lenses to various news agencies around the globe. As of 1994, Nikon had produced no more than 35 of these lenses.


As usual, the big item for this auction comes from Wetzlar's own, Leica. Somehow they have a Leica 0 available at this year's auction.

Leica 0-Series (1923)

Estimate €1,500,000-€2,000,000

leica0 728x410 - The catalogue for the upcoming Wetzlar Camera Auction has been published. There are some Canon goodies available
https://www.liveauctioneers.com/item/158015580_leica-0-series

In 1923, two years before the market launch of the Leica, 22 to 25 cameras of what is now known as the Leica 0 series were built for testing purposes, of which 16 units are still known worldwide. Based on the assessment of the Leica 0 series by the experts involved, Ernst Leitz II decided in 1924 to mass-produce the camera designed by Oskar Barnack. The “revolution in photography” thus initiated took its course. The Leica 0 series is therefore not only the prototypes of the Leica I, but the prototypes of all Leica miniature cameras to this day.


You can check out all items available at this year's auction at the Wetzlar Camera Auction website.

Bidding starts on October 7, 2023.

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3 comments

  1. I have the 85/1.5 LTM in much better condition than this. even all the boxes and red inserts are there.
    Almost never shoot it anymore, because of its value and overlap with the 75/1.4 Lux (and the 28-70/2), but a few days ago I mounted on the R6 Mark II and it made some nice portraits.
    Would have been nice to get a 35/1.5 LTM to compliment it, but it's too late now (35/2 LTM is still a good one).
  2. I have the 85/1.5 LTM in much better condition than this. even all the boxes and red inserts are there.
    Almost never shoot it anymore, because of its value and overlap with the 75/1.4 Lux (and the 28-70/2), but a few days ago I mounted on the R6 Mark II and it made some nice portraits.
    Would have been nice to get a 35/1.5 LTM to compliment it, but it's too late now (35/2 LTM is still a good one).

    Nice! I have always wanted to splurge on an SSC or the 85 LTM, but at their current market prices, I will just look at pictures of them.

    Is the 85 like the 35? Basically the same optics as the Canon K35 cinema lenses?

    I have a couple of the more affordable LTM Canon lenses. The 19mm is scary the first time you mount it, I have never seen a lens that protrudes as much.

    L1001715.jpg

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