September 15, 2014, 05:45:57 AM

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Drizzt321

Pages: 1 ... 41 42 [43] 44 45 ... 112
631
Few months ago I was shooting a school building. I was told it'd be empty, but there was some after school basketball tournament no-one told me about. I checked in at the office, they knew I was supposed to be there, and they gave me a visitor badge to wear. And every 5 minutes one of the teacher came to me, asking why I'm taking pictures of the kids. I tried to explain I was hoping the building was empty, as I didn't want people on the pics. Most took the explanation, but one older lady was really pressing me if I was really supposed to be there, and that was I really taking pictures of the building and not the kids.

Wow.
When did it become 'illegal' to take pictures of kids? What gives them special 'rights' the rest of us don't seem to have?

It's the fear that has been propagated by the media that everyone is out to kidnap and abuse your kids, or use them for some other nefarious reason. Especially men, they are teh debil, and obviously just looking for an excuse.

This is very unfortunate, as it could be a great challenge to shoot kids at a playground or something since they're moving all around so fast and always are doing something.

632
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: what to do
« on: May 28, 2013, 06:33:58 PM »
i shoot only landscapes

Where do you shoot your landscapes? Are you unhappy with your results now?

Some of your ISO woes may be because you have to hand-hold everything at the moment, while if you get a good tripod you don't have to bump it up so high, since you can exposure for a longer time. That won't freeze any action that is occurring unfortunately, but sometimes it's nice to have car light streaks :)



in cities, iso could be better on my camera

633
Canon General / Re: Pelican Storm Case Question
« on: May 28, 2013, 06:30:34 PM »
Dark and moist are the worst enemy that gear can have - the perfect environment for fungus. I use a series of Pelican 1620 cases to store gear in, but only on occasion do I keep lenses in there. With that said, I still have a ton of studio and lighting gear that gets used indoors and out. Usually, if I'm out with the gear shooting, I'll leave the cases open for a week or so an air-conditioned before closing and putting the gear away. I'm in Indiana, so our climates are fairly similar.

However, I do keep huge bags of molecular sieve in the cases to maintain dryness. I used to use silica gel, but got tired of it not drying the air enough in damp environments. I get the stuff from here for cheaper than usual: http://sorbentsystems.com/desiccant_overview.html I use the 80unit bags and the dry boxes in my mobile gear bags.

I also use the sieve to dry out submerged computers (I'm the IT director for quite a few businesses in our area and deal with bad users more often than I would like). Haven't had one that I couldn't fix yet...

Low humidity tends to be good for equipment, but you might not want it to be completely dry. Don't forget there are lubricants and such in lenses and they do need a certain amount of humidity. I agree on principle with throwing some silica packs, or that sorbent systems stuff you linked, but don't let it get bone dry.

634
EOS Bodies / Re: Patent - New Superzooms
« on: May 28, 2013, 02:21:13 PM »
I didn't even realize Canon had a EF 28-200, I thought the only FF super-zoom was the 28-300L, which while not super amazing was quite solidly decent to good.

635
EOS Bodies - For Video / Re: Stills photographer Doing some video
« on: May 26, 2013, 04:01:53 AM »
Were you planning on doing the editing? Or were you going to send that out? I'd recommend sending it out, and talking to whoever is going to be doing the editing first to get their recommendation on what settings to use as they may have some preferred picture style (such as Cinestyle).

636
Video & Movie / Re: Reshoots advice
« on: May 26, 2013, 03:26:09 AM »
If things are starting to get contentious, I'd talk to a lawyer, or if you're a member of PPA or something similar see if there's a staff legal team for advice. And above all, this is why you get things in writing, even if it's a simple email saying "Here's what we agreed over the phone, please confirm that this is correct."

637
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: what to do
« on: May 25, 2013, 05:34:54 PM »
THE 6D IS QUITE TEMPTING but so expensive

The 6D is quite good for what it is, although it lacks some things a more general high end camera like the 5d3 does well (specifically the AF system and a few edge features). What lenses do you have now? If you have a couple of good lenses, you may gain more by the 6D which will be a big jump over the 500D's sensor in many situations. If you don't have any good lenses, go for a good lens or two, and a good tripod if you don't have one. Don't forget to get a shutter release cable and learn how to use it and mirror lockup for your landscapes.


55 -250mm

18-55mm
no tripod

Ok, so none of your current lenses will work on the 6D, since those are EF-S lenses. If you go for the 6D kit with 24-105L it's a pretty nice all-around lens, but even stopped down it won't excel at landscapes. Great general purpose lens though.

If you're serious about landscapes, I'd first get a good quality tripod. Skip the $200-300 range, and go a bit higher. I don't have the link handy, but basically it's a cost comparison showing someone starting off with a really cheap tripod, decide they need a better one and get a mid-range, then decide they need a better one and get a higher end tripod. In the end, they would have saved money if they had gone right for the higher end tripod. Not that I'm saying you should spend $600 on the lens, and another $400 on the head, but if you can budget $600-700 for legs + nice head, you'll be a lot happier for a long time.

Next, I'd go for another lens. Depends on you're budget and desire, but for landscape I'd go more for the 17-40L or 24mm Samyang/Rokinon lens. That one is manual focus, manual aperture, and you won't have any lens EXIF info, but it is pretty good optically, especially when stopped down to f/4 or a bit further. However, the Canon 17-40L is more flexible, although it starts at f/4 it does improve stopped down and has AF and full lens EXIF info. Both of those are around $600-700 I believe. For you, I'd recommend the Canon 17-40L for now, and it should suit you're needs pretty good.

So, for less than the cost of a 6D body only, you can get a very good tripod and a good quality lens that will be quite good for your current needs, and give you some room to grow and experiment and learn. I also recommend going online and searching and reading about landscape photography. There is a lot of material out there on the internet. I likely will take some time to learn the techniques, and then figure your style, but keep at it and don't give up.


what tripod do you head do you recommend?

would the 6d and the 17-40 give me substantially better shots

I'd say start with a tripod and 17-40L, and save you're money for a year or two and see where you're at. Maybe get another lens in the middle sometime. Right now it sounds like you don't have a lot of experience shooting, but really want to get more into it. Eventually you will likely want to upgrade to a full-frame sensor, but not necessary at the moment. Once you've shot with the 17-40 for a while, learned more about what and how you like to shoot but still want the 6D, I'd rent it for a week or so and shoot some side-by-side if you can with your current body and see if you really think it's a huge leap in image quality.

Substantially better shots is quite subjective, as most photos are more limited by the composition (so you), and the lighting which you may or may not be able to influence or control. Equipment does play a role, but in most cases composition and lighting make the photo, rather than the specific lens and/or body. You may certainly reach a point or want to shoot something where you will need better equipment, or some specialized equipment (such as a Tilt-Shift lens for architectural photography).

As for tripods, I'm not an expert on them so I'll defer, but Gitzo and Really Right Stuff are both top quality brands, and Benro has a pretty good reputation despite it being Chinese knockoffs. Remember that tripods and heads have limits as to their maximum designed weight they can hold. I'd recommend overspeccing by quite a bit, rather than getting just what you think you'll need. That's what I did and I'm quite grateful I did as I now have a 8+ pound medium format film camera, which if I specced to the equipment I have otherwise what I got wouldn't have been able to hand it. I'd say spec to 12+ pounds which will let you move up to a larger body, and heavier glass while still having a margin and likely not having a tripod that weighs a ton, especially if you get a carbon fiber one.

638
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: what to do
« on: May 25, 2013, 04:56:58 PM »
THE 6D IS QUITE TEMPTING but so expensive

The 6D is quite good for what it is, although it lacks some things a more general high end camera like the 5d3 does well (specifically the AF system and a few edge features). What lenses do you have now? If you have a couple of good lenses, you may gain more by the 6D which will be a big jump over the 500D's sensor in many situations. If you don't have any good lenses, go for a good lens or two, and a good tripod if you don't have one. Don't forget to get a shutter release cable and learn how to use it and mirror lockup for your landscapes.


55 -250mm

18-55mm
no tripod

Ok, so none of your current lenses will work on the 6D, since those are EF-S lenses. If you go for the 6D kit with 24-105L it's a pretty nice all-around lens, but even stopped down it won't excel at landscapes. Great general purpose lens though.

If you're serious about landscapes, I'd first get a good quality tripod. Skip the $200-300 range, and go a bit higher. I don't have the link handy, but basically it's a cost comparison showing someone starting off with a really cheap tripod, decide they need a better one and get a mid-range, then decide they need a better one and get a higher end tripod. In the end, they would have saved money if they had gone right for the higher end tripod. Not that I'm saying you should spend $600 on the lens, and another $400 on the head, but if you can budget $600-700 for legs + nice head, you'll be a lot happier for a long time.

Next, I'd go for another lens. Depends on you're budget and desire, but for landscape I'd go more for the 17-40L or 24mm Samyang/Rokinon lens. That one is manual focus, manual aperture, and you won't have any lens EXIF info, but it is pretty good optically, especially when stopped down to f/4 or a bit further. However, the Canon 17-40L is more flexible, although it starts at f/4 it does improve stopped down and has AF and full lens EXIF info. Both of those are around $600-700 I believe. For you, I'd recommend the Canon 17-40L for now, and it should suit you're needs pretty good.

So, for less than the cost of a 6D body only, you can get a very good tripod and a good quality lens that will be quite good for your current needs, and give you some room to grow and experiment and learn. I also recommend going online and searching and reading about landscape photography. There is a lot of material out there on the internet. I likely will take some time to learn the techniques, and then figure your style, but keep at it and don't give up.

639
Perkeo I, 6x6cm 120 roll folder, Tri-X 400, scanned on Epson v600 with VueScan. Cost me $70 with shipping on ebay, fully working.

640
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: A question for 5dmk3 and 1dx owners
« on: May 25, 2013, 04:26:30 PM »
Like DJL329 I often use the multi-controller to select the AF point. I'm often in 1+8 expansion, sometimes zone. When I'm doing AI-Servo, I usually use all AF points. In AI-Servo it has 1 AF point available to start with, you can move it around with the multi-controller, and then once you start the AF it will being tracking what you first put the AF point over as best as it can, based on the settings you have in that particular AF case you selected.

641
Obviously the RAW is doing vastly better, but did you do any color grading on the ALL-I at all? That might help it look a bit better, although from what I understand it might take a bit longer than doing a quick import into Lightroom, tweak settings then sync across all frames and export.

642
If the main purpose is to shoot video and portability is not a problem, I would go for a heavier tripod with a video head.

#1, get a good tripod.
Lightweight and carbon fibre tripods are fantastic for carrying around with you, but when you shoot video heavy and solid means more fluid movement. The video heads, particularly the fluid heads, allow much smoother panning than the typical ball-head. (ball heads give jerky uneven movement when panned and are harder to level) Make sure your tripod can get to the height you wish to shoot at and still be stable when panned. Note that you can put your camera bag (or a big container of water) under your tripod and tie a rope from it to the bottom of your tripod to increase stability. A sudden gust of wind and a tall lightweight tripod can quickly become a very expensive crash to the ground.

For video, definitely this. Especially the video head, rather than a ball head. Fluid head if possible, but those start getting expensive. Ball heads are much more difficult to use for video, especially if you intend to pan.

643
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: what to do
« on: May 25, 2013, 03:55:53 PM »
THE 6D IS QUITE TEMPTING but so expensive

The 6D is quite good for what it is, although it lacks some things a more general high end camera like the 5d3 does well (specifically the AF system and a few edge features). What lenses do you have now? If you have a couple of good lenses, you may gain more by the 6D which will be a big jump over the 500D's sensor in many situations. If you don't have any good lenses, go for a good lens or two, and a good tripod if you don't have one. Don't forget to get a shutter release cable and learn how to use it and mirror lockup for your landscapes.

644
A comment on the write speed problem, it might be that the CF card has to have good garbage collection, because if you want to write to a NAND block that already has data, you first have to clear it, then write to it. Some of the cheaper ones might not implement that well, and it might be that the better CF card controllers can detect when a card is reformatted (rather than delete files) and mark those blocks to be cleared out in advance of need like the TRIM command that modern SATA SSDs support.

I will test this out. Based on my experience and what you're suggesting, I think the best route will be to fill a card in sequence and then reformat after it fills up. Hell, I won't even preview clips. After I get sustained speeds, I can test and figure out what compromises the card speed.

I'm just extrapolating based off of modern SSDs. Ah, looks like CF 6.0 introduced UDMA7, as well as TRIM command just like SSDs have. So I imagine that's what is being used during a delete/quick-format to tell the controller that it no longer needs to keep the NAND blocks permanently, and can clear them out at will. This is part of what the controller garbage collection does, and usually operates in the background. So it might be you need to leave it sitting for a short bit in the camera/reader after deleting/formatting the card to give it power and let it do it's background cleanup to keep maximum performance.

The test you're describing is part of what Ananadtech.com does during it's SSD tests, as well they now check the consistency of latency which can be important to avoid buffer overruns in a case like this, where if it has a brief spike in latency that might reduce overall throughput just enough that you start dropping a few frames.

645
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: what to do
« on: May 25, 2013, 02:22:19 PM »
is gitzo a good tripod

Gitzo is a good brand, as is RRS (Really Right Stuff), and I have a Benro which is a chinese knockoff of some of the more expensive Gitzo/RRS, but it's pretty good quality. I'd recommend going for Arca-Swiss type heads (Gitzo, RRS, some others) rather than Manfrotto which apparently doesn't have just 1 standard for quick release plates, but a couple.

However, tripods (plus head) can easily range up to the price of a good lens, however as long as you don't knock it around too much, they tend to last as long as a good lens.

Pages: 1 ... 41 42 [43] 44 45 ... 112