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Messages - jrista

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1126
Canon General / Re: Another Canon Medium Format Mention
« on: August 11, 2014, 08:58:55 PM »
Would Canon benefit from offering some kind of product similar to the Leica S? Not a "full-blown" MF system to compete with Phase One or Hasselblad, but still something larger than 35mm?

I'm just not sure of the benefit given 35mm sensors now boast amazingly high resolution. The quality of the pixels is what Leica sells in their S body, given its comparatively modest resolution for a MF system. The leap in quality undoubtedly exists in the lenses.

Interesting play on Canon's part...

It's not about resolution, it's about sensor area. For a given subject framing, assuming you frame the same in all cameras, a larger sensor will always perform better. It doesn't matter how many pixels there are or how big they are, all that matters is the total amount of light gathered. Bigger sensor, more light at any given aperture. A MFD gathers more light than 35mm which gathers more light than APS-C which gathers more light than m4/3 which gathers more light than the inch fractional sensors at f/4. Simple as that.

1127
Animal Kingdom / Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« on: August 11, 2014, 05:38:04 PM »
LOL  ;D  Not Islander's one....Dylan's one.

Ah...the conversations got crossed. Dylan's could be a Reddish...tough lighting on that one. The neck is definitely wrong for a Green Heron on Dylan's, though.

1128
Animal Kingdom / Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« on: August 11, 2014, 05:33:27 PM »
That's the one I think it is

http://ibc.lynxeds.com/photo/reddish-egret-egretta-rufescens/narrow-beach-along-kennedy-causeway

Most definitely not that. That bird is different in many respects. Wrong bill color, wrong neck type, does not have the yellow patch at the eye, does not have the same type and amount of varigated feathers along the back, DOES have long, thin feathers off the back, which the Green Heron (and the bird in Islander's photo) do not have, it's legs are the wrong color, doesn't have the white just around the lower part of the eye patch  around the bill, does not have the white streaks down the neck and breast.

Bird identification is a pretty solid science. Aside from a short period of time when birds are juvenile, their colorations and markers are VERY specific. There are far too many differences between the Reddish Heron and Green Heron to mistake the two. Islander's bird is definitely a Green Heron.

1129
Animal Kingdom / Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« on: August 11, 2014, 05:21:11 PM »
No, that's not a Green Heron for sure.

Dylan got the same bird, here

http://www.canonrumors.com/forum/index.php?topic=19270.1095;topicseen

And you can see a Green Heron just above from Islander.

Dunno, looks a lot like a Green Heron to me:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Green_heron

1130
Third Party Manufacturers / Re: Another Nikon full-frame
« on: August 11, 2014, 04:51:18 PM »
So my answer is, where are the new improved models from Canon today?

Pending. Canon does not iterate as fast as Nikon. That may have put them behind a little, but I think in general, having a longer cycle than a year or so is good for business. It is NOT satisfying to spend three grand plus on a piece of high end equipment, only to have the company "fix" it's issues, then ask you for another three grand a year and a half later. If you read Nikon Rumors forums, that reaction is evident in a lot of Nikon users. They may have the better sensor technology, but that doesn't mean Nikon owners are compliantless.

We cannot really speak to Canon's new sensor technology yet. It's too soon. The 7D II will be the first real opportunity for anyone to see if Canon has done anything on that front or not.


1131
Photography Technique / Re: Questions about Shooting the Supermoon
« on: August 11, 2014, 04:46:56 PM »
Mackguyver's image reminded me of some of my older supermoon photos. Most of these were from a couple years back, when the supermoon was the closest in 18 years (March 19th, 2011 @ 221,565mi, vs. the 221,765mi of this year). When the moon is full, I don't usually try to photograph it in detail...there just isn't any.

But it makes for great artistic photos, if you can catch it lower in the horizon, behind a thin layer of clouds, or painting a sky full of whispy clouds:



Very nice series....I can almost hear a wolf howling.

LOL, yeah. This one is definitely a wolf moon. :D

1132
Photography Technique / Re: Questions about Shooting the Supermoon
« on: August 11, 2014, 04:09:27 PM »
Mackguyver's image reminded me of some of my older supermoon photos. Most of these were from a couple years back, when the supermoon was the closest in 18 years (March 19th, 2011 @ 221,565mi, vs. the 221,765mi of this year). When the moon is full, I don't usually try to photograph it in detail...there just isn't any.

But it makes for great artistic photos, if you can catch it lower in the horizon, behind a thin layer of clouds, or painting a sky full of whispy clouds:












1133

What camera out there, anywhere, offers any kind of significant advantage (and by that, I mean the 2+ stops DR improvement the Sony Exmor cameras get at ISO 100) in DR over any other camera, AT HIGH ISO? I mean, if such a thing exists...I'd like to know about it...but frankly, aside from the 1D X at ISO 12800, 25600, and 51200 (which is actually less than a 2-stop difference compared to any other camera), I don't think it does.


The goal posts seem to be shifting. The discussion above was about dynamic range in general for wildlife. Not specific brands.

I think developing this tech is just as important (regardless of who develops it at higher ISO's) as IS and other improvements within the context of wildlife photography.

Well, DR discussions usually involve just two or three specific brands, and the tone of the conversation is always the same. I guess I assumed, apologies.

However, you handily skipped past the FAR more important part of the post you quoted. I think it's an important discussion, and I believe your answers are important, because fundamentally, at high ISO, the available dynamic range is ultimately bound by physics, not technology. So, if you don't mind:

Quote
We disagree here. It's as simple as that. I could point you to my own work, at http://jonrista.com (since you insist I make the case myself), as well as the work of numerous professional bird and wildlife photographers who have been using Canon gear for years, and never seem to complain about the lack of DR at the very high ISO settings they use. Not only that, their work is phenomenal.

You have to understand, unless you are talking about shooting wildlife at ISO 100 and 200, there is very little difference in DR at higher ISO settings, with the exception of the 1D X (which has a good stop and a half ADVANTAGE at VERY high ISO settings.) Did you miss my post where I shared the DR numbers from sensorgen for the D810, D800, 5D III, and 1D X? I thought that would have put the issue to rest. Are you talking about wildlife photography shot at ISO 100 or 200, or are we talking about your crepuscular light wildlife photography, at ISO 12800?

Could you answer the questions posed? Are you shooting wildlife at ISO 100 and 200 on a regular basis? If so, how do you reconcile that with your prior comments about crepuscular light and ISO 12800? Is there a camera out there that gets 14 stops of DR at ISO 12800? Is there a camera out there that gets more than 10 stops of DR at ISO 12800?

At high ISO, with the exception of one or two VERY expensive cameras, there is little to no difference in dynamic range! It doesn't matter if your using a D810, an A7r, a or a 5D III. There is less than a stop difference between the lot at ISO 12800. They are all full frame cameras, and in a normalized context, they will all perform roughly the same in crepuscular light for wildlife. You can eek a bit more performance out of a 1D X or a D4, but were still very far from the 2+ stop advantage an Exmor has over most other sensors at ISO 100.

If high ISO DR is critical to your shooting style, I still think Canon has the advantage because of ML. I found the thread that discusses their high ISO DR improvements (which, on the 6D, bring you to 1D X/D4 levels of DR):

http://www.magiclantern.fm/forum/index.php?topic=10111.0

According to this thread, the high ISO DR tweak does NOT use the dual ISO technique that reduces vertical resolution...it uses a tweak of the downstream amplifier to avoid clipping the signal, thereby preserving about 1/2 a stop additional DR at all ISO levels.

1134
EOS Bodies / Re: Canon to Make a Big Splash at Photokina? [CR2]
« on: August 11, 2014, 12:23:22 AM »
Umm...toothpaste? That's where this conversation went? Seriously....?  :o

Is there some variant of Godwin's Law that applies to toothpaste?   8)

Haha, maybe! :D We could call it Orangutan's Law, if no one else has coined it yet. :P

1135
Third Party Manufacturers / Re: Sony A77II
« on: August 10, 2014, 11:18:29 PM »
This is curious because sometimes I have 2 or 3 photos out of focus for no reason then. I assume I lock on to the subject by placing the subject in my focus point and depressing the shutter halfway (or using the back button).

If this is the indeed the case, I do have a problem with my 1DX because that is exactly how I do it.



But we are all clear on my 1DX I have to keep my focus point on the subject I am tracking where the A77ii or A6000 I do not?

No, you do not. The 1D X will change which focus points are used, because it is tracking for you. You can either use all points mode, or one of the zone modes, and it will use all of the available points in the selected mode. You do not have to do anything as far as keeping any particular point on the subject once tracking has started (and that occurs as soon as the subject is locked for the first frame.)

If that is NOT working for you, then you have a problem with your 1D X.

You keep saying focus point. That makes me think you are using single point AF mode. You don't want to use that mode for sports or any kind of AF that requires tracking. You want to use either AF Point Expansion Mode (which will utilize the 4 or 8 points surrounding the selected point), AF Zone modes (which let you pic a grid of points smaller than every point in the array), or all AF points mode. If you want to have some control over what region of the frame is used for AF, but want to use a lot of AF points for tracking, you should be using zone mode.

If your using a single point AF mode, then that's your problem. You've then configured the camera to use only one single point, and it will only ever use that point until you change it, or choose a different mode.

1136
EOS Bodies / Re: Canon to Make a Big Splash at Photokina? [CR2]
« on: August 10, 2014, 10:47:34 PM »
Umm...toothpaste? That's where this conversation went? Seriously....?  :o

1137
Third Party Manufacturers / Re: Sony A77II
« on: August 10, 2014, 10:43:54 PM »
But we are all clear on my 1DX I have to keep my focus point on the subject I am tracking where the A77ii or A6000 I do not?

No, you do not. The 1D X will change which focus points are used, because it is tracking for you. You can either use all points mode, or one of the zone modes, and it will use all of the available points in the selected mode. You do not have to do anything as far as keeping any particular point on the subject once tracking has started (and that occurs as soon as the subject is locked for the first frame.)

If that is NOT working for you, then you have a problem with your 1D X.

1138
Here is a normalized comparison of Alan's lapwing images:



I think the IQ of the 7D image has improved to the same level as the 5D III image for the subject. There is still more background noise, however I averaged the background with a median filter and measured the levels. The 7D image has an average level of 99-101 (RGB channels), while the 5D III image has an average level of 106/125/150 (RGB Channels). The brighter background level is helping the 5D III image a bit from a noise standpoint.

(Note, noise is worth in both images here due to GIF format.)

1139
I actually had at one stage a 5dIII, 70D and 7D (with 300mm f/2.8II+2xTCIII) and tested them in good light by photographing lapwings on a raft at extreme distance. All the following shots are 100% crops, processed identically in DxO and with PRIME noise reduction, that virtually eliminates noise. Top is the 70D, which is 671x711 pixels; middle 7D; middle 7D, which is 643x655 pixels; bottom is 5DII, which is 483x447 pixels. In the next post, the 70D is tested against the 5DIII. Under these reach limited conditions, there seems little, if any advantage of using the APS-C.

Just off a cursory glance, it looks like the 5D III is better lit. If you don't mind, I'm going to downsample the middle 7D bird to the same size as the 5D III bird, so we can compare properly normalized results.

1140

I would say the results of many professional bird and wildlife photographers, who do exactly what you describe for a living, and use Canon cameras to create phenomenal works of art, would prove this post to be fundamentally wrong.

Don't hide behind platitudes, Jrista. Make the case for yourself.

This is your quote:

Quote
Anyway, when it comes to bird and wildlife photography, dynamic range is just not an issue.

It's a huge issue. Unless you're shooting with flash, or baiting animals (two practices I find unethical), DR is going to play a huge role.

We disagree here. It's as simple as that. I could point you to my own work, at http://jonrista.com (since you insist I make the case myself), as well as the work of numerous professional bird and wildlife photographers who have been using Canon gear for years, and never seem to complain about the lack of DR at the very high ISO settings they use. Not only that, their work is phenomenal.

You have to understand, unless you are talking about shooting wildlife at ISO 100 and 200, there is very little difference in DR at higher ISO settings, with the exception of the 1D X (which has a good stop and a half ADVANTAGE at VERY high ISO settings.) Did you miss my post where I shared the DR numbers from sensorgen for the D810, D800, 5D III, and 1D X? I thought that would have put the issue to rest. Are you talking about wildlife photography shot at ISO 100 or 200, or are we talking about your crepuscular light wildlife photography, at ISO 12800?

What camera out there, anywhere, offers any kind of significant advantage (and by that, I mean the 2+ stops DR improvement the Sony Exmor cameras get at ISO 100) in DR over any other camera, AT HIGH ISO? I mean, if such a thing exists...I'd like to know about it...but frankly, aside from the 1D X at ISO 12800, 25600, and 51200 (which is actually less than a 2-stop difference compared to any other camera), I don't think it does.

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