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Messages - Quasimodo

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346
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: Why do we buy Canon? What idiots are we?
« on: April 27, 2013, 02:59:48 AM »
I admit being an idiot. Clicking on this thread proves it

347
Lenses / Re: 24-70L II is fantastic
« on: April 26, 2013, 06:26:21 PM »

Scanning the City by Jesse Herzog, on Flickr


Kensington by Jesse Herzog, on Flickr

Cool and creative first shot, but the shaddow of the person seems amiss. Is it pp later on?

348
Reviews / Re: Review - Sigma 35mm f/1.4 DG HSM
« on: April 25, 2013, 04:14:28 PM »
with that USB docking thingy from sigma it looks like we can adjust focus at 4 different focusing distances for primes. Sigma posted a video of it in action. looks very clear and powerful to me.

Link? :)

349
I can't help you with the stacking thing unfortunately
but I gotta ask why use f/8?
I use 2.8 on my 16-35 with the focus set to infinity..
That way you can keep your ISO down to a minimum and get less noise at
the same amount of time.. using the 600 rule...
If you have a 30 Sec exposure using ISO 6400 @ f/8 you can go down to
ISO 800 @ f/2.8 and still have a 30 sec exposure..
You'll still get the sharpness you need..

What is the 600 rule?

Thanks,

C
A rule of thumb method to calculate the maximum exposure time, for a particular focal length, before star trails become noticeable. It's simply 600 / focal length = exposure time (in seconds).

For a 50mm lens, 600/50 = 12 seconds.
For a 15mm lens, 600/15 = 40 seconds.

By keeping the exposure to those times or less, the stars appear as dots, not trails.

THANK YOU!!!

Wow...talk about a VERY informative post for a noob!!!!

Thank you very much!

C

ps. Do you have any insight into what stacking photos are? Is that similar to HDR photography?

There is many programs who can help you with stacking, and you use stacking for many things, which among them are stacking panoramas, HDR or focus stacking. There are great tutorials on this if you enter these names on youtube. I use Photoshop CS 6 for this, and Photoshop 5 before that and I think it works great.

Example one Panorama picture (and you can see the result earlier in this post with my shot from Shanghai). I used a 5D II with a 16-35 II. I turned the camera to portrait mode (vertically, to get more sky) and shot eight pictures free hand. What I normally do is to make sure that the pictures overlap with about 25%. After getting them on the computer just go to photoshop - file - Automate - Photomerge and then choose the option that work best for your shot.

Example two Focus Stacking. Although a lowres version of this picture, this picture is taken with the 17mm TS and is comprised of 28 pictures in one.

Focus stacking can be especially useful in macropictures as DOF is very shallow.

Good luck.

350
I can't help you with the stacking thing unfortunately
but I gotta ask why use f/8?
I use 2.8 on my 16-35 with the focus set to infinity..
That way you can keep your ISO down to a minimum and get less noise at
the same amount of time.. using the 600 rule...
If you have a 30 Sec exposure using ISO 6400 @ f/8 you can go down to
ISO 800 @ f/2.8 and still have a 30 sec exposure..
You'll still get the sharpness you need..

What is the 600 rule?

Thanks,

C
A rule of thumb method to calculate the maximum exposure time, for a particular focal length, before star trails become noticeable. It's simply 600 / focal length = exposure time (in seconds).

For a 50mm lens, 600/50 = 12 seconds.
For a 15mm lens, 600/15 = 40 seconds.

By keeping the exposure to those times or less, the stars appear as dots, not trails.

Thank you :) I did not know that, but it is very useful information.

351
I'm actually doing a Workshop end this month with Pak Rarindra here in Jkt, dropped a 2 week Dive Trip so I could attend a 4 Day Private Workshop, My skills as a Landscape Photographer hopefully will be improved.

Do you mind filming it? ;) I would not mind to pay for a step by step video tutorial!

352
If I might add a question. Does anyone here know how to make this filmatic effect in the pictures of Tastino (quoted by SJT, http://www.canonrumors.com/forum/index.php?topic=302.240 )  Apart from being great shots, I would love if there was a good tutorial on how to acheive this effect

G.

353
I'm telling you, the background wall of trees, the tree at right at the middle distance in the beam of light, the island of trees, the boat....those are all completely separate photos composited and blended beautifully.

have a look at this tutorial: http://photoshoptutorials.ws/photoshop-tutorials/photo-manipulation/create-this-breathtaking-photo-manipulation-of-a-tightrope-dancer-in-photoshop/

Pretty cool. Thanks :)

354
Quasi, no problem.  I bet you could sell prints of it!

You are too kind :)

355
Pedro, nice topic...I too am a night shooting enthusiast.

Mr. Bean, what hemisphere was that top photo of the Milky Way shot from?  Those two "clouds" to the right side...I suspect they have a name...starting with "M"...never seen pics of them before.  Also...Do you prefer the Zeiss 15mm over the 21mm?

Quasimodo, I love your Shanghai panorama!  However, I don't care for the grayscale version at all.  Did you ever do a print of either version, and if so, how large?

Thank you! The grayscale version was just to test for the OP here. I have not gotten the chance to print it yet. I also nelieve that I have a way to go in PP before doing so :)

356
I thought for a while when first reading your post that he was using alpha channel adjustments. Having now seen the video it seems he has just gone and altered the view to grayscale. Click on Image - Mode - Grayscale (this is just a viewing mode while working on the file), and change it back when done with the adjustments. Working in a grayscale is much easier as it's easier to see the adjustments without being distracted by the colors and colorfringing and such.


I have CS 6, but the same should apply. Also, be sure to shoot in Raw, as it gives you more flexibility in pulling on curves and levels afterwards.

Good luck.

Hi, thanks for your post. My problem is in CS2 if I have the color tiff on my PS desktop and click image-mode-grayscales, PS asks me: "Do you want to discard the color data?" And then as far as I can see it gets iretrievable afterwards...hmmm.

@MrBean: Thanks a lot! I will do so. Did several like that before, always like touch the limits ;- at least photography wise...

Cheers, Pedro

Hmmm.. Seems you are right. I have never used this, but gotten a grey picture when sharpening in alpha layers, so I thought it was retriveable. It probably is, I just don't know how to do it. There are however many people in this forum who are experts on photoshop.

Below is a picture (actually eight taken with the 16-35 II, and stiched) I took some weeks ago in Shanghai. Below that is the same picture converted to grayscale, the one I was not able to revert.. I'd be interested in seeing how to solve this :)

Good luck.

357
I thought for a while when first reading your post that he was using alpha channel adjustments. Having now seen the video it seems he has just gone and altered the view to grayscale. Click on Image - Mode - Grayscale (this is just a viewing mode while working on the file), and change it back when done with the adjustments. Working in a grayscale is much easier as it's easier to see the adjustments without being distracted by the colors and colorfringing and such.


I have CS 6, but the same should apply. Also, be sure to shoot in Raw, as it gives you more flexibility in pulling on curves and levels afterwards.

Good luck.

Hi, thanks for your post. My problem is in CS2 if I have the color tiff on my PS desktop and click image-mode-grayscales, PS asks me: "Do you want to discard the color data?" And then as far as I can see it gets iretrievable afterwards...hmmm.

@MrBean: Thanks a lot! I will do so. Did several like that before, always like touch the limits ;- at least photography wise...

Cheers, Pedro

Have to put the kids to bed, then I will check it out :)

358
I have CS 6 ...Good luck.

When did CS6 become available???

Ehhh... It was released last summer/fall.

359
Portrait / Re: Pretty bad...
« on: April 22, 2013, 07:42:18 AM »
LOL, you made my day with this hillarious article. Thank you for bringing here :)

360
I thought for a while when first reading your post that he was using alpha channel adjustments. Having now seen the video it seems he has just gone and altered the view to grayscale. Click on Image - Mode - Grayscale (this is just a viewing mode while working on the file), and change it back when done with the adjustments. Working in a grayscale is much easier as it's easier to see the adjustments without being distracted by the colors and colorfringing and such.

I have CS 6, but the same should apply. Also, be sure to shoot in Raw, as it gives you more flexibility in pulling on curves and levels afterwards.

Good luck.

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