July 28, 2014, 04:41:55 PM

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Messages - Aglet

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16
PowerShot Cameras / Re: G1x vs. G16 vs. ??
« on: July 04, 2014, 01:01:41 AM »
if you have roomy pockets, Fuji XE1 + 27mm pancake prime is not very big
Same lens fits on the much smaller XM1 and XA1 which also come kitted with a very good but slow 16-50 zoom.
APSC sensor and very good IQ altho dim, low contrast subjects can be hard to AF.
OTOH, the Fuji X-20 has is also worth a look.

17
Lenses / Re: 70-200 f2.8ii or i
« on: July 03, 2014, 01:04:35 AM »
..Neither have direct equals in other bands which says a lot about the quality of these lenses.


uhmmm..  the Nikon 70-200 f/4 VR may not be pro quality build but it's optically quite a good performer and is, for example, one of the better lenses to use on a D800e for maximum resolution.

So there's one.

And the Tamron 70-200 f/2.8 VC is no slouch either, turning in a similarly good performance.
That's 2 other options or at least one if you want an EF mount.

18
Lenses / Re: Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 (1st gen., metal mount)
« on: July 03, 2014, 12:59:50 AM »
the older one doesn't just have a metal mount, it has a distance scale that's part-way useful.
it has a longer focus throw so it's also easier to focus manually than the v2, but it can also be slower to AF than the short-throw v2
The focus feature alone may make it more useful for some budget video work.
I have both versions, I think they're about the same optically, never compared them for that purpose.  I prefer the handling of the v1, even if it's a tad slower to AF at times.  v2 is definitely better for grabbing some candid shots as it's quicker to AF.
Can't go wrong for the price you're paying for it. ;)

19
I shoot very little landscape.  Virtually everything I shoot is alive, and occasionally I jumping around doing gymnastics or trampoline indoors in horrible light.  It is a struggle to get a fast enough shutter speed without going 1-2 stops above 3200.  Then I am limited to how much I can blow it up, because the image really has little detail.

Sounds like you're gonna need a decent full-frame body with a very good AF system to get what you want, and a fast lens to go with it, both in terms of light gathering and AF speed.
It aint gonna be cheap.

20
Third Party Manufacturers / Re: D810!!!
« on: July 02, 2014, 12:54:05 AM »
Stupid many of you thinking about buttons and stuff, if you buy a new beautiful car you don´t think about the buttons YOU GET USED TO IT ... i´ve been a canon owner since 2008 when i started shooting , and been shooting aurora, volcano's and models and using 1ds mk III now , i like it but i´ve been waiting for something like the d810.
Really cant wait for the results in aurora and night shooting and the d810 really F****d the 5d mk III up in video shooting BIG differences so grow up and think about the facts if you really are a good shooter and need a better quality in your photos, if not stick to your favorite. As in now Nikon got the best one on the market ( sorry to say for you religious people )  but it´s a fact

all the best to you
Gunnar

Poor ergonomics can spoil one's experience. (I'm not saying Canon has better ergonomics, I've never used Nikon cameras so can't compare). But I encounter poorly designed products every day, and it's depressing. Somebody actually designed a jug or kettle that spills when you pour, or tissue that tears anywhere but the perforations, or plastic film that requires a set of surgical tools to remove. Sure, we can (and usually have to) get used to these things, but I don't think it's asking too much that these problems are ironed out before going into production.

Of course, these are much more clear cut than button positions on a camera, I suspect, which is more a matter of personal taste. Fwiw I also have my dials programmed so one does ISO with a button pushed down - it is a lot quicker than the other cameras I've used, and tiny differences can add up to a better experience.

Canon's ergonomics and intuitive controls are still my favorites, despite how some buttons layouts tend to drift around from body to body.

The most vexatious ergnomics has to be on my Fuji XT1; very enjoyable camera to use except my early production model has THE WORST buttons ever put on top level body I've ever experienced.  I darn near need an ice-pick to operate the L cursor button.  I thought the 60D had some mushy-flush buttons but the XT1 takes the big raspberry in that regard.

So yes, poor ergonomics or funky control operations can certainly make a potentially good imaging tool not live up to its potential.
I presume the D810 buttons and controls are pretty similar to the D800's and they're decent, not fantastic.  One can learn to live with them and customize a few to improve the overall experience and yes, even shoot fairly adeptly with one hand, if necessary.

21
Lenses / Re: 70-200 f2.8ii or i
« on: July 02, 2014, 12:28:39 AM »
Regarding IQ, the 70-200 f/2.8L II IS is best, the 70-200 f/4L IS is 2nd best, and then the 70-200 f/2.8L I lens.  It is a very good lens.

I had the non-IS, OK
had the IS v1, OK at the short end and very soft at the long end.*
sold it, got the v2, very nice and sharp, some CA in FF corners.
Found v2 could render some absolutely hideous bokeh at times, too often for my liking, so sold it too.  Busy backgrounds that were near the transition zone could look aweful, not like the smoother rendering of other lenses.  That can be the price you pay for a well-corrected lens.

I prefer the overall image balance I get from am older Tamron, pre VC model.  The newest Tamron is pretty decent for the $ if you don't need the toughness or caché of the big white piece of pipe.  What you save there allows you to buy their 24-70/2.8 VC also.
It really depends on what you need the lens to do.  There's more to consider than just sharpness or how effective the stabilization is or how much CA there is.

* Turned out my v1 was not so much soft at the long end as front focusing quite badly at greater subject distances.  Discovered that when MF'd images at 200mm were considerably sharper than AF shots.

22
Canon General / Re: Gear Sale/Separation Anxiety?
« on: June 29, 2014, 02:05:17 PM »
No regrets after selling anything. It may have happened at the very first time but later when I defined what I needed and what to look for, no regrets at all.
Specially, most photographers consider a 50mm a must lens to have, I have bought and sold four and no regrets, including the 50L.

I DO regret selling my well-worn old 50/1.4 USM and keeping the new one in a box which turned out to be incapable of focusing properly.  I really shoulda checked it out before making that decision, not well AFTER the warranty expired.  :-[

23
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: Dynamic Range Question
« on: June 29, 2014, 02:02:15 PM »
..After PP the image quality will be far more about initial exposure and PP rather than the camera chosen.

Agreed except for that last bit...
The camera chosen may determine the character of noise visible and how you may need to handle it during PP.  Some camera choices may limit your PP options in some areas of the image, all else (e.g. exposure) being equal.

24
HAHA!  :)  MSP sure didn't have a positive D800 experience.
I, OTOH, LUV the darn things. :)

BUT, I rarely need hi ISO abilities.  When I do, I find I can still get high quality images even from 3200 ISO with only a small amount of NR required.

So, part of what you'll need to consider when you make a decision like this is knowing HOW high of and ISO you're going to be operating at on a "need" basis.  If you don't "need" to go about 3200, the d800 class of camera will still provide a lot of detail.  If you need to go higher ISO on a regular basis then you may want to choose something like the 6D or more premium bodies but pay close attention to the types of noise produced by all cameras.  Random niose is not a bit deal, pattern noise is a big hassle and sometimes a complete deal-breaker.  The latter is why most of my gear is no longer Canon.

Not surprised...

And you shouldn't be, the 36MP Sony sensors have better mid to hi ISO performance than some shooters are aware of.
That IS what you're not surprised about, is it not?

25
Third Party Manufacturers / Re: D810!!!
« on: June 29, 2014, 01:51:53 PM »
The ISO button is still in a funny spot. I will not switch until that issue is addressed.

YES, it is in a funny spot but it's easy enough to find, if a tad awkward at times.

However, this is not an issue that needs to be addressed, it already has been.
You can program ISO function to the rear control wheel, for example.

I find it wonderfully easy to operate the camera in Av mode using the front control for aperture, Canon-style, with the rear control dial providing fast easy ISO setting ability even better than the Canon button-then-control-wheel method, just watch your ISO in the viewfinder display.
When in full manual, ya, gotta schlep back to the awkward but easy to find button but might also be possible to program ISO to another button on the front of the camera too....  My front buttons are currently programmed for DoF/stopdown and artificial horizon control instead.

Edit - clarified language

26
HAHA!  :)  MSP sure didn't have a positive D800 experience.
I, OTOH, LUV the darn things. :)

BUT, I rarely need hi ISO abilities.  When I do, I find I can still get high quality images even from 3200 ISO with only a small amount of NR required.

So, part of what you'll need to consider when you make a decision like this is knowing HOW high of and ISO you're going to be operating at on a "need" basis.  If you don't "need" to go about 3200, the d800 class of camera will still provide a lot of detail.  If you need to go higher ISO on a regular basis then you may want to choose something like the 6D or more premium bodies but pay close attention to the types of noise produced by all cameras.  Random niose is not a bit deal, pattern noise is a big hassle and sometimes a complete deal-breaker.  The latter is why most of my gear is no longer Canon.

27
seems to provide much smoother bokeh than my 70-200/2.8L v2!  But I knew it would.
Smoother than my Nikon 70-200/4 VR. too.

28
Canon General / Re: Gear Sale/Separation Anxiety?
« on: June 28, 2014, 04:00:23 AM »
7d, 5d2, 70-200s of every type, 50/1.4s, 85/1.8, about 10 Rebels and various other Canon kit all punted from my inventory without any sorrow. Was relieved to be rid of my 5d2, waffled on the 7d but had to sell it while recovered value was still very good.
I won't sell my 40D, 60D or 100-400mm quite as readily tho.
I have a much harder time trying to think of parting with any of my ABC gear tho.  Only sold a bit of underused Pentax gear with some anxiety, even tho I had duplicates. I'd sell more Pentax gear but it's at the bad part of its depreciation curve so I may as well get more years of use from it.
No Nikons have left the fold, neither have any Fuji or Olympus products, tho the latter will eventually get thinned out.  I'm actually adding Fuji and Oly gear yet.
The more I have, the less I'm attached to any one piece.  :D

29
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: Dynamic Range Question
« on: June 28, 2014, 03:51:24 AM »
that's not a very hi DR scene, just a very bright and slightly overexposed one.
What ISO were you at for that?

30
Software & Accessories / Re: Apple to Cease work on Aperture
« on: June 28, 2014, 03:50:09 AM »
no loss to me, the few times I tried Aperture it was quirky but interesting but it completely choked and died on my large collections. LR, DXO, DPP, ViewNX, ACR,  Irridient, PhotoNinja, GIMP, and more, all have a useful place in my workflow.

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