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Messages - swrightgfx

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31
Lenses / Re: Canon 85 1.8 vs. Sigma 85 1.4
« on: May 03, 2012, 10:09:41 PM »
I'd put in a vote for 85/1.8. It is one of, if not the best value lens in the Canon line-up. Yes, it will give you fringing wide-open and a little smaller, but this can be corrected. I disagree with others above who have claimed that this lens is not sharp wide, as I have found it to be usable all the way to 1.8 and very sharp thereafter, though there may be some copy variation, given it is not an L.

The AF is pretty quick, too. For this reason, I usually throw it in the bag with the 35L for streets, which gives me plenty of extra reach without having to run toward my subjects, scaring some of them off and also works well for grabbing the "anomaly in the crowd" shot.

32
Lenses / Re: Worth Getting 24L & 35L both?
« on: May 03, 2012, 09:59:14 PM »
Definitely the 35L, as the 24L risks the advent of fat-head/fat-leg syndrome. It is also a nicer lens in the hand, in my opinion, and the focus ring feels better for video for me, should you wish to get some wedding footage, too.

33
Lenses / Re: Canon 100mm f2.8 L is owners, dust circle inside lens?
« on: May 03, 2012, 09:49:59 AM »
Is it fine white powder? (No, I am not implying Canon or the retailer are involved in drug trafficking!)

I have seen this before. It is from some sort of low-density plastic or rubber, from what I gather, probably as an agent to keep it dry enough not to harbour fungus (think talc). From what I have read, it being of the amount that it is visible is rare (perhaps limited to a particular batch), but is also quite stationary and "stuck" to the surface upon which it sits. I guess it isn't a good idea to throw your lenses around, which would likely loosen it, but that probably applies white dust or not.

34
Not specific to Canon lenses, though some were obtained unintentially:

I bought a Pentax 50/1.7 to go with my (first) ME Super. I had bought the lens off a seller on eBay for a rather steep cost of AU$45; although it was detailed as being in particularly mint condition. As I lived nearby the seller I broke the golden rule of eBay policy and organised a local pick-up/cash exchange. After testing the lens and handing over my cash, the seller asked, "Would you be interested in any other lenses or film cameras? I have a couple of boxes that will be difficult to take with me." He was moving interstate a couple days later and needed to clear some stuff. I sorted through the box, finding plenty of goodies including, amongst others, every model Pentax M camera (including ME-F), two Spotmatics (one "F"), several Pentax 50s of various breeds, other K mount lenses, two Olympus OMs, a Canon AE-1 and FL 50/1.4, two Minoltas, Rokkor 50/1.4, Kowa rangefinder (mint), Tamron Adaptall, Sigma primes, some studio gear (basic lights, stands, reflectors, etc.) and more.

All up, around fifteen cameras and ten lenses.

He gave them to me for free.

35

"hit millions of happy users"

you don't really think that there are that many people with 5D Mark III's do you?
In colloquial English millions means lots and lots. No one knows how may 5DIIIs will be sold, but you can bet it will be at least as many as 5DIIs

Um, "millions" can mean literal or figurative. I think in context you should of rather said "a lot" or "thousands" which is more specific and leaves less room for misunderstanding.

Where did you learn English?  ;D

England

I got a Masters in English at Oxford  :) now shooo
Oh really? Which college?

I love how this thread has taken on a better topic.

EDIT: Text found its way into quote.

36
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: Canon ID Mark IV availability?
« on: April 27, 2012, 04:15:57 AM »
Anyone on the major supply line through a certain distributor I know that runs out of HK and controls about 40% of the grey market should be able to help you out. In English, almost half of the HK-based online stores.

37
"tarnished the reputation of a fine camera"

reputation of a CAMERA???? what's with you people??
I do believe this was in reference to second-hand value, potentially reduced over a big fuss about a problem that is not symptomatic within the specifications of the device and has been evident on other models unnoticed for years.

38
Canon has the tech. They do, after all, have a 120MP APS-H sensor, which I believe is still the highest-resolving sensor, in terms of relative size.

39
Lenses / Re: 70-200/70-300
« on: April 27, 2012, 03:48:40 AM »
For me the only downside was the tripod collar is not included, and a better quality bag would have been nice for the money being paid. I am still very happy with it and those two issues were definitely not deal breakers.

http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Tripod-Mount-Ring-Collar-II-W-Canon-70-200mm-f-4L-USM-Flocked-SSW-NIB-/380425803607?pt=AU_TripodsMonopods&hash=item5893251757

40
Hello all,

I wasn't sure where to put this, as it could apply to both EOS and consumer or mirrorless devices.

Anyway, attached is a patent application for what seems to be a new method for phase detection autofocus, not requiring an AF sensor within target of a half mirror, quick return mirror, etc. From my understanding, the want to do away with a dedicated AF sensor for phase detection and instead incorporating it into the sensor would be either to save space and reduce the size of future entry-level SLRs, or as a method for a future mirrorless to knock over the competition. (As far as I know, the Nikon 1 is the only mirrorless to feature a form of phase detection at a sensor level, albeit "hybrid" with contrast detection.)

Thoughts?

EDIT: Notice the focus on video and the allowance for switching between pixel skipping and binning.

41

"hit millions of happy users"

you don't really think that there are that many people with 5D Mark III's do you?

In colloquial English millions means lots and lots. No one knows how may 5DIIIs will be sold, but you can bet it will be at least as many as 5DIIs

Um, "millions" can mean literal or figurative. I think in context you should of rather said "a lot" or "thousands" which is more specific and leaves less room for misunderstanding.

Where did you learn English?  ;D

England
Ha ha. Brilliant. I cannot speak for where from ramon123 hails, but I do find myself misunderstood by those not of the same British language learning as myself, who often take my words too seriously, ignoring the sarcasm or exaggerated nature and taking everything literally!

42
EOS Bodies / Re: The Last Generation of the Crop Sensor Cameras
« on: April 27, 2012, 02:58:15 AM »
Why is everyone assuming this topic is saying that aps-c is dying.

This thread is about the top of the range as the OP came back and said

- I could never see a 600 on a NEX5 sized body, the ergonomics would be appalling
- the mass market is NOTHING to do with this thread, a total red herring
- aps-c lens is a red herring because the top of the range cameras will not and are not be aps-c
- the 5DIII is the first sign of the 7D market being erroded, apart from 2fps it is superior in every department
- mirrorless is just another technology that is available, but not central to the deign engineers. It has a lot of potential - but does it scale to mf?
- I believe aps-h has the potential of being the aps-c of the next generation of semi pro cameras due to is low manufacturing costs (compared to ff). It is also a size very usefull to video people and therefore could power the low end (semi pro)  video market

I dont understand why people are so fixated and defensive about aps-s especially in the market place where IQ is king.

I have an original Canon APS film camera which promised the earth and delivered dirt, OK for holiday snaps but little else - it was relegated to the back of the cupboard and the older, relegated 35mm Canon 100 was brought out again. I can see history repeating itself here - the 7D has still not got past the original 5D in IQ yet is being feted as a fantastic camera, hardly got past the image IQ of the 40D either (although better in low light)

If all the 7D users were given a 5DIII for 6 months, I would suggest that hardly any would want to switch back.
Top-of-the-line cameras were a subtext of the OPs original question, which regarded the possibility of crop sensor obsolescence. I don't think anyone has claimed crops to be superior to full-frame, so I am not sure what you are getting at. They are a cheaper alternative that alot of people use - here, were are debating the long-term viability and feasibility of that system, not its use in the real world in professional devices as a replacement for full-frame.


Smirky wrote:

"Please note... I didn't say that it was dead now. I said this coming was the last generation in the PRO lines. This means a single digit followed by a D (e.g. 7D). They'll continue to make all kinds of other cameras with crop sensors."

My point is that hanging onto a technology that has its limitations is not a good strategy for the future. Nothing to do with what is on the market today

In the way that P&S is getting larger sensors then the semi pro bodies MUST move too - else the P&S will swamp them as the 7D segment will have nothing to offer over and above the $500 P&S
Sorry, fair call. Though he does go on to draw comparison between $500 point-and-shoots and the 7D, so I think it pointless not to include Rebels, etc.

43
EOS Bodies / Re: The Last Generation of the Crop Sensor Cameras
« on: April 27, 2012, 02:40:42 AM »
Why is everyone assuming this topic is saying that aps-c is dying.

This thread is about the top of the range as the OP came back and said

- I could never see a 600 on a NEX5 sized body, the ergonomics would be appalling
- the mass market is NOTHING to do with this thread, a total red herring
- aps-c lens is a red herring because the top of the range cameras will not and are not be aps-c
- the 5DIII is the first sign of the 7D market being erroded, apart from 2fps it is superior in every department
- mirrorless is just another technology that is available, but not central to the deign engineers. It has a lot of potential - but does it scale to mf?
- I believe aps-h has the potential of being the aps-c of the next generation of semi pro cameras due to is low manufacturing costs (compared to ff). It is also a size very usefull to video people and therefore could power the low end (semi pro)  video market

I dont understand why people are so fixated and defensive about aps-s especially in the market place where IQ is king.

I have an original Canon APS film camera which promised the earth and delivered dirt, OK for holiday snaps but little else - it was relegated to the back of the cupboard and the older, relegated 35mm Canon 100 was brought out again. I can see history repeating itself here - the 7D has still not got past the original 5D in IQ yet is being feted as a fantastic camera, hardly got past the image IQ of the 40D either (although better in low light)

If all the 7D users were given a 5DIII for 6 months, I would suggest that hardly any would want to switch back.
Top-of-the-line cameras were a subtext of the OPs original question, which regarded the possibility of crop sensor obsolescence. I don't think anyone has claimed crops to be superior to full-frame, so I am not sure what you are getting at. They are a cheaper alternative that alot of people use - here, were are debating the long-term viability and feasibility of that system, not its use in the real world in professional devices as a replacement for full-frame.

44
EOS Bodies / Re: Fast Primes on 5dm3
« on: April 27, 2012, 01:58:52 AM »
Well generally the 85L is slow. It is basically its only imperfection and likely the only change should Canon consider a III. I prefer shooting with the much cheaper, but still very sharp and wide 85 1.8 for this reason.

In terms of the 35L. My favourite Canon lens. Beautiful. The 24 is very nice too, but a bit too wide a prime for me.

45
EOS Bodies / Re: The Last Generation of the Crop Sensor Cameras
« on: April 27, 2012, 01:30:11 AM »
I agree with smirkypants. I don't know when, but I think eventually everything will be full frame. Or maybe even some new dimension.

 
How large would a camera phone be with a FF sensor??  Somehow, I don't think this is the case, tiny cameras are in demand.

Umm: http://www.artefactgroup.com/wvil/
That would be something, if ever it came to fruition!

Back on topic:
As others have said, crop sensors play an important role in the photographer learning curve, being cheaper but otherwise similar devices, and also make perfect business sense in a product>product life-cycle. Crops will remain for a long time.

However, I do believe they will change form, at some stage. Mirrorless cameras have steadily increased in sales and price due to clever marketing and, let's face it, size and portability. What this means for APS-C dSLRs, is that they have to be a LOT better than their EVF-only counterparts.

For the most part, Olympus, Panasonic, Sony, et al. have done a monumental job of catching up to crop-frame devices. I think part of the reason for the Nikon D3200 is to trump amateurs with high-megapixel, awe-inducing figures and sway them from equally-priced mirrorless options after failing with the Nikon 1. Truth is, the D3200 still lacks a lot of the appeal of mirrorless in its size and, no offence to the Nikon designers, ugliness.

Eventually, Canon will need to do something to fight back some of the market it is set to lose. Luckily, Canon has maintained good sales, with the first generation mirrorless actually acting as a bridge to APS-C and then on to full-frame SLRs; however, this will change. How they go about this will spell the future for APS-C mirrored devices, Canon prosumer point-and-shoots, or even their amateur line more generally.. From what I can think of, they have a couple of options:

1. Decrease APS-C dSLR size and modify styling.
Pentax released the K-x in 2009 at 123x92x68mm and Canon the 500D at 126x98x65mm. These were small in dSLR terms (the smallest I am aware of with APS-C or larger), and not too different to the (much wider) Fujifilm X-Pro1 at 139.5x81.8x42.6mm.  Let's be honest, dSLRs are ugly. Seriously ugly. Most crop-sensor buyers will never be professional photographers - they do it for the fun. Having a cool looking camera is part of that fun.

2. Join the dark side.
The old "if you can't beat 'em, join them" philosophy. An APS-C Canonet is already the talk of amateur camera forums the world over. If Canon invest in CMOS, throw on an EF-S mount and a hybrid EVF, and release a couple of pancakes and collapsibles, they could charge more than the rest, yet still attract the majority of market share. It would spell the death of mirrored crop-sensor devices, but at least we full-frame users would have a compact body to turn to without having to use our EF lenses in MF on something like a Sony Nex.


EDIT: WVIL at CES last year:
WVIL unbelievable new camera at CES 2011 Small | Large

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