January 28, 2015, 05:20:34 PM

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - ecka

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 49
1
Canon General / Re: Photographer Petitions Canon for Left Handed Camera
« on: January 27, 2015, 07:52:11 AM »
Fully agree. While I really like Ecka's idea with the left side battery/handgrip, a DSLR does not seem to be a good choice for left-handed operation at all. Too big, too heavy.

Mirrorless would be a much easier - and immediately available - route to go. Canon EOS M or even smaller M2 - (maybe even M3 any time soon) plus any of the EF-M lenses, including zooms is lighter and easier to handle - thanks to touchscreen.

I got a small 29 € L-bracket for my EOS-M that could be used as left side grip to hold camera, while turning zoom ring with index finger and tapping touchscreen with thumb to select/activate AF. Camera can then be set to take shot automatically as soon as focus is locked. Right hand not needed for (basic) operation.

I'll probably get shot for saying this on a canon forum,  but if small size and weight were paramount, I would pick up one of the Olympus micro 4/3 cameras.

I agree. It is really big and heavy, but the same idea should work for SL1/100D or even EOS M (yes, a battery grip for EOS M :D ).

2
Canon General / Re: Photographer Petitions Canon for Left Handed Camera
« on: January 27, 2015, 07:43:56 AM »
Hi ecka.
I think this is absolutely the correct route, at least this is what I saw in my head when I started reading this post, just don't have the ability to create the artwork, nice job by the way. If I'm correct the 5DIII and 7DII both have the joystick duplicated on the battery grip so the only major control that is not dealt with on this solution is the rear scroll wheel.
How difficult would it be for one of the third party manufacturers to run with this, they have access to all the control buttons and wheels needed. The only addition I can see that might be needed is an aluminium or maybe carbon composite reinforcement for the L shape due to the torque that would be transmitted especially on some of the larger standard zooms before you get to the range equipped with a bracket. I know that there would be costs but with today's rapid prototyping technology I'm sure this could be kept quite low.
Amazing to get from problem to solution in 5 pages!

Cheers, Graham.

PS @ dilbert, thank your lucky stars that you are not disabled and be less selfish in your attitude towards us, there are a lot of us out here!

This is it ;)

Hi Graham. Everything is possible, at least in my world :). We only need tools to make it happen.

3
Canon General / Re: Photographer Petitions Canon for Left Handed Camera
« on: January 26, 2015, 06:43:16 PM »
Pistol Grips are readily available, can use either hand.

use it as is, or could be the base of a project to make a left grip.



This could work even for some bigger lenses with collars, like 100-400L or 300/4L :).

4
Canon General / Re: Photographer Petitions Canon for Left Handed Camera
« on: January 26, 2015, 03:36:07 PM »
This is it ;)

5
Canon General / Re: Photographer Petitions Canon for Left Handed Camera
« on: January 26, 2015, 02:59:38 PM »
I support the optional "left grip" idea.
Could an ambidextrous design work for right-handed people too? :) Any advantages?

6
Lenses / Re: Which Sigma Lense?
« on: January 25, 2015, 01:17:46 PM »
Definitely Sigma 18-35/1.8 Art.

7
Lenses / Re: Upgrading lenses for college student
« on: January 24, 2015, 10:54:26 AM »
Best budget lenses:
EF-S 18-55 IS STM
EF-S 55-250 IS STM
EF-S 10-18 IS STM
EF-S 24/2.8 STM
EF 40/2.8 STM
YN 50/1.8

8
Landscape / Re: Within Forests
« on: January 20, 2015, 08:08:08 PM »

IMG_1261 by ecka84, on Flickr

9
Since getting a 35mm f/2 IS, I rarely use the 40mm pancake.  If the 35mm IS fits in your budget, I'd recommend going for that instead of the 40mm.  I also find myself preferring to either use the 35mm or any of the 50mm options I have, including the 50mm f/1.8 II.  The positives about the 40mm pancake are the low cost, fast and quiet focusing, and size.  My negatives are "just OK" image quality (maybe I have a bad copy) and the short barrel doesn't give you much to hold onto.

I don't mind the build quality and noisy AF of the 50mm 1.8 II.  I don't think the AF is that slow.  Yeah, the bokeh isn't as pleasing as that of other 50mm lenses, but it costs a lot less.  If I had to make a recommendation to someone, I'd advise the 40mm pancake over the 50mm 1.8 II.  They'd probably be happiest with the 40mm, but I know they'd be even happier with the 35mm f/2 IS.

Even though I don't use it often, I can't bring myself to sell the 40mm pancake.  First, I wouldn't get much for it.  Second, it's so convenient to carry as a wide-ish just-in-case option when I am using telephoto lenses.

TBH, from what I've seen, 35 IS has some really nervous and bad looking bokeh, which perhaps is typical for 35mm. Not to mention the monstrous 3 stops of vignetting wide open. The IS is good for video, very good, but is it worth 4 times more than the 40mm pancake? The tiny thing is one stop slower, but it vignettes one stop less too. I'm just trying to be objective, the pancake has it's own shortcomings, but (IMHO) there is a lot less to hate about it, for the price.
Curious.  The-Digital-Picture.com confirms your note on vignetting, but the bokeh looks pretty good.  I use mine wide open most of the time (which is one reason for buying an f2.0 lens) and haven't noticed the vignetting at all.  I have no complaints on bokeh, but then my subject matter hasn't revealed it much.

You make a good point on value.  The pancake is an incredible lens for a great price.  The 35 IS shines in low light, action, and creative slow shutter shots.  One needs to determine whether these scenarios are worth the extra price tag.

Well, 35 IS bokeh may be lacking the smoothness in a specific focus range, just like 40 STM does, but it also has that "directional pattern" towards the edges and corners, which (IMHO) makes it even worse. Maybe it's not that obvious on crop cameras, but on FF it looks pretty bad.
About the vignetting. It may not show if you are shooting JPGs with the peripheral illumination correction turned on.

10
Since getting a 35mm f/2 IS, I rarely use the 40mm pancake.  If the 35mm IS fits in your budget, I'd recommend going for that instead of the 40mm.  I also find myself preferring to either use the 35mm or any of the 50mm options I have, including the 50mm f/1.8 II.  The positives about the 40mm pancake are the low cost, fast and quiet focusing, and size.  My negatives are "just OK" image quality (maybe I have a bad copy) and the short barrel doesn't give you much to hold onto.

I don't mind the build quality and noisy AF of the 50mm 1.8 II.  I don't think the AF is that slow.  Yeah, the bokeh isn't as pleasing as that of other 50mm lenses, but it costs a lot less.  If I had to make a recommendation to someone, I'd advise the 40mm pancake over the 50mm 1.8 II.  They'd probably be happiest with the 40mm, but I know they'd be even happier with the 35mm f/2 IS.

Even though I don't use it often, I can't bring myself to sell the 40mm pancake.  First, I wouldn't get much for it.  Second, it's so convenient to carry as a wide-ish just-in-case option when I am using telephoto lenses.

TBH, from what I've seen, 35 IS has some really nervous and bad looking bokeh, which perhaps is typical for 35mm. Not to mention the monstrous 3 stops of vignetting wide open. The IS is good for video, very good, but is it worth 4 times more than the 40mm pancake? The tiny thing is one stop slower, but it vignettes one stop less too. I'm just trying to be objective, the pancake has it's own shortcomings, but (IMHO) there is a lot less to hate about it, for the price.

11
50/1.8 AF noise alone could compromise the low profile, unless it is a very noisy street :).
40 STM works for me.

12
Lenses / Re: My New "L"
« on: January 17, 2015, 06:53:43 PM »
Do you know that you can use EF-S 60/2.8 Macro on your 5D with EF 12 II Extension Tube, or similar third party alternatives? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAr9FfFxlqo

No I didn't.  Wouldn't the vingetting be severe?

According to the Australian guy from the video, there is no vignetting at all. Just watch it :).

13
Lenses / Re: My New "L"
« on: January 17, 2015, 06:08:24 PM »

You shoot crop, so the 60mm will double as a very good portrait lens while the 100mm will be a bit long for many portrait purposes.

Can I encourage you to focus your L envy at a different L? I think you'll get more benefit...!

Hi Joey - thanks for your response.  I have both crop and FF camera's and I would like a macro to fit my 5D.  I have no problems with the 60mm macro, it is a fine lens and has produced some awesome pictures, but I don't see the need to keep both lenses when I would have one lens that will work with both cameras.   I've attached one of my favorite pictures using the 60 macro.  The exposure is a tad dark, but the butterfly had just hatched and was posing perfect on my daughter's finger for a hand held shot.  It's amazing just how furry butterflies are.  :)

-wes

Do you know that you can use EF-S 60/2.8 Macro on your 5D with EF 12 II Extension Tube, or similar third party alternatives? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAr9FfFxlqo

14
Photography Technique / Re: Extension tubes and mfd
« on: January 17, 2015, 08:23:12 AM »
Infinity or not, I didn't notice much difference. 40STM pancake works great with extension tubes. I'm using Marumi Ext. Tubes 13+21+31.
13mm gives me ~ 0.33x at infinity and ~ 0.5x at MFD. Not a small magnification difference (1:3 vs 1:2).
21mm ~ 0.55x - 0.7x
31mm ~ 0.8x - 1.0x
I think that sharpness depends on the lens itself. If it's not that sharp at MFD, then it won't be with ext. tubes as well.

15
Canon General / Re: Opinion: The myth of the upgrade path
« on: January 14, 2015, 05:47:35 PM »
...
Besides, if us lumpen proletariat took your advice and all went full frame, ...

Then sooner or later there would be no more APS-C cameras in production. FF would become much cheaper. FF Rebel class would materialize and bring a lot of joy for everyone. As simple as that.


And wildlife and sports shooters who enjoyed longer reach without having to shell out for the equivalent reach on full frame are hosed. So now you have a "cheap" full frame body...and have to spend twice as much on lenses. :P

No. Why? :) 50+mp FF can capture everything that 20mp APS-C can (and more, 2.5x more), with the same lens.

But never at the same speed, same price etc. CR is made up of people who are a far cry from your run of the mill dslr shooter. The majority do not want FF: they don't want the size, dof,  longer focal length, cost, lens size/ cost etc etc.

My daughter returned recently from Iceland where she had her 1100D and 55-250 STM, and she has some superb images of Puffins, including some in flight. The last thing she wants is a FF camera for all the reasons given above.

The same though crossed my mind with ATM's comment about being held back by APS. He must shoot some very niche stuff.

It is possible to get the same speed in crop mode, if you like, but you'll lose the "crop later" feature.
The majority want magic P&S, which runs without batteries, with a FB upload button and x-ray vision :).
Actually, EF-S 55-250 STM is a very good lens, almost as good as it gets, on a crop body. The sensor size is the real bottleneck there and if you want much better IQ from a zoom lens (than 55-250), then you should get larger sensor camera.

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 49