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Messages - unfocused

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46
EOS Bodies / Re: EOS 7D Replacement Mentioned Again [CR1]
« on: March 14, 2014, 04:05:47 PM »
... the days of the mirror-flipping high fps beast seem to be almost over.

Marsu, don't tell me you're buying into the mirrorless hype. :)

Canon's delaying strategy worked on me and I bit the bullet last fall with a 5DIII. But, I'm still interested in a 7D II.

I think my list is pretty modest.

5DIII style autofocus
Dual card slots (one each)
600 RT settings through the menu (that's a certainty)
Modest improvement in sensor, particularly in reduced noise
If higher megapixels, no loss in image quality
Weather sealing at least to 5DIII standards
Same basic controls as 5DIII
Frame Rate equal to or better than current 7D

Basically, I want a second body that I can shoot birds and wildlife with when I'm distance limited and know I'll need to crop a significant portion of the frame away.





47
EOS Bodies / Re: Calumet Photo Files Chapter 7 Bankruptcy
« on: March 14, 2014, 03:52:13 PM »
Yes, very unfortunate for the employees, the company and for the market itself.

While I hate to profit from someone's misfortune, I looked up Chap. 7. That's used for liquidations, rather than reorganization. If the stores liquidate their stock in a public sale, I may be making a trip to Chicago. Although I suppose it is more likely that they will sell everything to a third party.

48
While I might be interested in a lower cost strobe to supplement the 600 RT, I am certain it won't be able to use an external battery pack, which is a deal breaker for me.

The 600 RT has come down enough in price that for a savings of $100 or so, it's just not worth it. Also, I'm not interested if the menu system isn't identical (which it probably wouldn't be). I really don't want to learn yet another set of buttons.

Frankly, my biggest concern is what happens when the next generation comes out. I'm heavily invested now in the system: five 600 RTs plus the ST-R3 and not looking forward to having to start afresh again if Canon comes out with some super new technology.

49
EOS Bodies / Re: Canon's Medium Format
« on: March 14, 2014, 11:30:38 AM »
The big market for high end gear is not pro photographers, it is wealthy enthusiasts, just look at the "limited edition" Leica market.

Not that I think a Canon MF speculation has legs, I don't believe it does, whereas the Cinema range has an expanding market and they can have leveraged the EF lens tech very well , I was just pointing out the faulty logic of linking gear price to pro use.

Exactly right.

50
EOS Bodies / Re: Canon's Medium Format
« on: March 14, 2014, 10:45:32 AM »
Um, you're missing the point entirely.  Why would Canon do it?  Because they'd help CREATE the market for it, by building it in the first place.  You speak of film...I'm talking about a sensor that is similar in size to the Leica S2.  Google it, and get back to me...

I certainly was not talking about what the consumer wants.  I was talking about WHAT THE PROFESSIONAL wants.

And, if Canon made a larger sensor in a very slightly larger body than the 5D3 or 1DX, with huge dynamic range (20 stops or more), huge signal to noise ratio, and as many MP as you could ask for (different sensor choices for the same body)...and an autofocus system that exceeds anything in existence today...along with the ability to shoot 8k video...and if they made a full line of lenses (including supertelephoto) that would work with this system...well I would definitely buy into it if I could both afford to and needed it for pro or high quality work.

10 years from now, just see if something like this isn't in widespread use...by PROFESSIONALS...not people taking selfies while driving drunk...

Okay. I'll play along.

I did Google the Leica you are referring to. It is $22,000 body only. For the sake of argument, let's say Canon could produce a similar product for half the cost, that's still $11,000, before lenses.

How would you propose Canon "CREATE" a market for this camera? You say "I was talking about WHAT THE PROFESSIONAL wants."

But what professionals are you referring to? Have you surveyed professionals and found this need? They don't seem to be beating down the door for the Leica, so what would create sudden demand for a Canon version?

About the only professional market that remains today is wedding and event photography and that is very price sensitive and competitive. I don't see most wedding photographers moving to this.

It's  not suitable for photojournalists or wildlife photographers. There are almost no professional landscape photographers. High-end commercial studio photographers maybe, but that's a very small market. So again, how would you suggest Canon "create" this market.

Nothing personal, I just don't agree with your original premise. I think Canon is better off concentrating on improvements in their existing formats.

51
EOS Bodies / Re: EOS 7D Replacement Mentioned Again [CR1]
« on: March 13, 2014, 12:15:37 PM »
The firmware 2.0 update lends itself to the fact that Canon may not release a replacement. If they were then why "unlock" a bunch of cool, useful features on a camera you were going to replace soon?  Seems to me it would (even a little) cut into sales of the new model.

D

The 2.0 major firmware update occurred in August, 2012. Back in 2012, the update was clearly intended to extend the life of the 7D and buy Canon some time. Perhaps they knew at the time that it would be nearly two years before they had a replacement ready.

At this point, the existence of the firmware upgrade would have little to no impact on a 7DII.

52
EOS Bodies / Re: Canon's Medium Format
« on: March 13, 2014, 09:58:20 AM »
Does anyone not think that, perhaps 10 years from now, Canon will be into Medium Format in a big way?

I think not.

Quote
It just seems everybody thinks small cameras will go extinct because of smartphones...

No. Simple, all purpose, fixed lens cameras with short zoom ranges may go extinct but small cameras will not. In fact, smart phones are small cameras. Small cameras that can fill a niche that a smart phone can't – Superzooms, waterproof and high-quality fixed lens – are likely to survive.

The truth is, Canon already makes medium (or possibly large) format cameras. They are called 1D, 5D and 6D. The standard format (by sales volume and use) is APS-C.

For the past 70 years or so, Canon and Nikon have been destroying the medium and large format (by film standards) market. Why would they invest in that money pit?

53
Street & City / Re: Street Portraits from a small Karoo town...
« on: March 12, 2014, 06:31:37 PM »
.
Always a good day when I come here and see you're posting some of your fine images!!

Thanks.

Agreed. When you are traveling like this, what's your technique for finding people and convincing them to pose? You do a great job of getting people to let you into their homes and their lives. Any secrets?

54
Third Party Manufacturers / Re: B&H or Adorama
« on: March 12, 2014, 12:30:56 PM »

55
Third Party Manufacturers / Re: B&H or Adorama
« on: March 12, 2014, 10:33:02 AM »


I am actually in the process of buying a new 1066X CF card and decided to check Adorama out as I rarely go to their site, and they do not even have the one I want....

I'd be interested to know which one it is, so I can alert our Purchasing Manager. Thank you: Helen@adorama.com

While on the topic. I am curious why Adorama doesn't seen to carry Transcend CF cards and very few SD cards.

56
Generally, I post personal photos on my Facebook page. Pictures of family mostly, but some vacation pictures to share the experience. Only occasionally do a post my "serious" work on Facebook. I reserve that for my website.

I've thought about trying to better coordinate the two and use Facebook to drive more people to my website. I may do that eventually, but haven't found the time for it yet.

57
EOS Bodies / Re: EOS 7D Replacement Mentioned Again [CR1]
« on: March 11, 2014, 01:44:44 PM »
I have been thinking about this lately and am going to make a controversial prediction:

I believe the 7DII will have the highest resolution of any Canon DSLR and I think it is entirely possible that future APS-C bodies may actually end up with more resolution than high-end full frame DSLRs.

Reasoning: The strength of the APS-C format (in addition to cost) is the perceived extra "reach" of the 1.6 crop factor. Crop sensors will never match the high ISO performance or dynamic range of a full frame sensor. But, what Canon demonstrated with the 70D is that they could increase the resolution of the sensor without sacrificing ISO performance or dynamic range.

The higher resolution 70D sensor performs at least as well as the 7D sensor in these areas. And, some argue it actually performs slightly better.

I am fully aware of the argument that a full frame sensor can be cropped to the same framing as an APS-C sensor without losing much perceived resolution.

But, that argument breaks down in cases where the photographer is distance limited and must crop the crop, so to speak. I'll leave the math to those who are more adept than I am, but just point out that a 24mp APS-C sensor can have half of its pixels cropped out and still produce a 12mp image.

Focusing on higher resolution at the top end of the APS-C line allows manufacturers to better differentiate the two formats for enthusiasts and professionals. Both formats function just fine for general purposes, but if you want to shoot under the most challenging lighting situations, full frame is the better bet. If you are a portrait or studio photographer shooting under controlled conditions, the larger format is better.

But, if you are a nature photographer or a sports photographer and you need to reach as deeply into the scene as possible without getting eaten by a bear, drowned chasing waterfowl or crushed by a 250 lb player, and need to do it at 8-12 fps, then you need a high-resolution, high performance crop frame camera that has sufficient headroom for you to crop even further when necessary.

I've long said Canon and Nikon don't want to convert everyone to full frame, they want instead to sell everyone two bodies. One way to do that is to play to the strengths of each format and differentiate them at the high end.

We all know that the worldwide camera market is struggling. Nikon and Canon need to find ways to increase their sales. It's far easier to get an existing customer to buy more than it is to find a new customer. Differentiating the two DSLR formats offers the hope of greatly expanding sales using the existing base of customers.

58
Quote
This thread seems like a good place to ask this.

I've always been an admirer of Irving Penn's portraits (Worlds in a Small Room, Small Trades, etc.). I've never figured out how to recreate the look of his backgrounds. I've only seen seamless paper in solid colors and while the muslin backgrounds come close, they just aren't quite the same. As others have said, unless you have some means of permanently leaving them hanging they are prone to wrinkles, which one would think wouldn't be a huge problem if you can blur the background, but unfortunately, even with full frame, it seems like there is never enough background blur to hide the wrinkles.

From pictures I've seen, it looks like Penn used Canvas.

Anyone here have any sources or ideas.

Most likely he used a custom hand painted Muslim. Traditionally Muslims were all hand painted and unique. it's a recent (last twenty years of so) development that you can get mass produced printed Muslims. Most modern Muslims are kinda cheesy IMO. They lack the classic qualities of a hand painted Muslim.

If you are going for that look you can buy blank Muslim and either hire a painter to paint it or give it a go yourself.

Unfortunate typo, muslin is quite different to Muslim  ;)

Ha! Yeah, It wouldn't be very polite or effective to paint a person as a backdrop. :)

I imagine it didn't hurt that he was using a large format camera as well. I'm still amazed at the images, especially as I understand that he generally used natural light in a portable tent-type studio. I've always felt Penn's portraits showed greater empathy for the subjects than Avedon. In my view, Avedon tended to go for the cheap shot in his American West series -- sort of a "Hey New Yorkers, look at these country bumpkins that inhabit the rural west. Aren't they bizarre and unsophisticated." I think Penn showed greater respect for his subjects.

59
This thread seems like a good place to ask this.

I've always been an admirer of Irving Penn's portraits (Worlds in a Small Room, Small Trades, etc.). I've never figured out how to recreate the look of his backgrounds. I've only seen seamless paper in solid colors and while the muslin backgrounds come close, they just aren't quite the same. As others have said, unless you have some means of permanently leaving them hanging they are prone to wrinkles, which one would think wouldn't be a huge problem if you can blur the background, but unfortunately, even with full frame, it seems like there is never enough background blur to hide the wrinkles.

From pictures I've seen, it looks like Penn used Canvas.

Anyone here have any sources or ideas.

I have no experience with these kind of backdrops, but I just ordered a "Wrinkle Free" backdrop from Amazon.
I can tell you if it is really "wrinkle free" after it gets delivered to me in about couple of weeks. Meanwhile, here is the link for what I ordered
http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B004IOTM0I/ref=dp_olp_new_mbc?ie=UTF8&condition=new


Thanks. In the meantime I also found a place called Backdropoutlet.com that offers something they call "titanium" backdrops that are supposed to be wrinkle-free. I may order one and try it out.

60
This thread seems like a good place to ask this.

I've always been an admirer of Irving Penn's portraits (Worlds in a Small Room, Small Trades, etc.). I've never figured out how to recreate the look of his backgrounds. I've only seen seamless paper in solid colors and while the muslin backgrounds come close, they just aren't quite the same. As others have said, unless you have some means of permanently leaving them hanging they are prone to wrinkles, which one would think wouldn't be a huge problem if you can blur the background, but unfortunately, even with full frame, it seems like there is never enough background blur to hide the wrinkles.

From pictures I've seen, it looks like Penn used Canvas.

Anyone here have any sources or ideas.

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