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Messages - Zv

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436
Lenses / Re: 17-40 VS 17-55
« on: October 24, 2013, 09:58:50 AM »
I had both lenses for a while and for me they are made for two different purposes. Although you can use the 17-40 on a crop body it's not optimized for it and at a max aperture of f/4 you are really limiting yourself (unless you have a tripod or love shooting at ISO ridiculous) as there is no IS either. It's a wide angle lens and has all the distortion and other flawa that go along with it. I guess on the plus side the soft corners get cropped away! 

Now, the 17-55 is my recommendation for anyone who wants a serious all purpose lens on their crop body. Sharp at all apertures, f/2.8, IS rated at 3 stops (I got more out it) and unbelievably fast AF. If it was weather sealed it would have been the ultimate lens. Shame that really. I did get dust inside but you know what, who cares? Dust doesn't matter. (I know because I stupidly tried to open it up and clean it out of vanity!).

I sold mine for the 24-105L but that was because I wanted to go FF otherwise I woulda kept the 17-55.

Note - I love the 17-40L on FF. I think it rocks as a UWA for the price. A bit of clever sharpening in post and voila!

437
Lenses / Re: 17-40 VS 17-55
« on: October 24, 2013, 09:45:02 AM »
I believe the answer to your question is to try out both lenses for yourself.
However, here are my thoughts (in no particular order) on my 17-40mm:
The 17-55 EFS gets rave reviews for it's optics but personally I'm not so bothered about razor sharp images.
I use the 17-40 mm L on my 550D a lot because it has the right focal length range for me.
I like the fact that the 17-40 focuses and zooms internally - the front element does not extend.
Corner sharpness is not such an issue on crop as it is on FF.
Note: The 17-40mm L auto-focuses very quickly.
I don't use the 17-40mm for my livelihood so I'm not too bothered by a little barrel distortion or softness.
This lens is relatively robust and seems well balanced on my 550D.
Having said all that, an extra f stop is always nice to have.

Wrong. I think you'll find that the front element actually does move a little when zooming but not beyond the the filter thread.

438
Canon General / Re: What's Next for Canon?
« on: October 23, 2013, 12:15:07 PM »
Retro is useless but can't be worse than TRONesque designs like the A7R. All in all, retro design can be the gaffer tape of mirrorless.

As to your point of size being a marketing ploy: if you think of interchangeable lens system and carrying a kit, I'd say you think like the new version of the newbie prosummer who is the target of those systems. Some of us here want a mirrorless where size is actually the main factor, fixed lens being totally fine. One focal to rule them all (they can probably have a 3 camera lineup, trinity wielding), daily camera for the photog man purse.

Carrying 3 cameras with fixed lenses?? That don't make no sense,  aint nobody got time for that!  :o

Hey when I go photographing I carry a medium format with shift lens, tripod, small camera like a eos m and a 5d2 with some sort of a lens...photography is hard work but its a hell of a lot easier than the old days of schlepping a 4x5 with all the stuff and 10 darkslides for half a day... :)

Well at least they are 3 different kinds of cameras for different purposes and have interchangeable lenses. I was referring to three with fixed lenses to do one job. So in that setup if he needed a fourth field of view he would buy another camera?

439
Canon General / Re: What's Next for Canon?
« on: October 22, 2013, 09:45:04 PM »
Retro is useless but can't be worse than TRONesque designs like the A7R. All in all, retro design can be the gaffer tape of mirrorless.

As to your point of size being a marketing ploy: if you think of interchangeable lens system and carrying a kit, I'd say you think like the new version of the newbie prosummer who is the target of those systems. Some of us here want a mirrorless where size is actually the main factor, fixed lens being totally fine. One focal to rule them all (they can probably have a 3 camera lineup, trinity wielding), daily camera for the photog man purse.

Carrying 3 cameras with fixed lenses?? That don't make no sense,  aint nobody got time for that!  :o


440
EOS Bodies / Re: What do you think will be the Shelf life of the EOS 6D ?
« on: October 22, 2013, 08:05:45 PM »
I pretty much quit worrying about sturdiness after watching that Digital Rev segment where they abuse a Rebel and a similar level Nikon.

The one where they try and trash a 7D and at the end it still worked was when I stopped worrying about sturdiness. Haven't seen the rebel one, need to look it up.

441
Canon General / Re: What's Next for Canon?
« on: October 21, 2013, 10:09:38 PM »
I'm pretty disappointed in Canon. Nothing has really been released that has me reaching for my wallet. No Fuji fighter mirrorless and no D800E killer (the only thing that might keep me in the brand).

Meanwhile "the other guys" look like they're dropping a Vintage looking body with a D4 sensor in it.

http://nikonrumors.com/2013/10/20/update-the-new-full-frame-retro-nikon-camera-will-have-f-mount-and-pentaprism.aspx/

This is the first time where I'm start to feel like I'm on the wrong boat.


Tell me, why do you feel the need for a "vintage body" all of a sudden? What is this fascination? Frankly, I' glad Canon aren't just jumping on the retro bandwagon to make a few bucks (with my luck they'll announce a retro body tomorrow and I'll be eating my words!!).

Here's an idea - don't complain that you can't spend your money fast enough. Give it to me if it bothers you!

 ;D


I don't want a vintage body... honestly, I could care less about how a camera looks as long as it feels right and the resulting images are amazing. I was simply noting that the other brand is releasing high end sensors in a smaller body which is the appeal of some of these Fuji and now Sony kits with a Full Frame. I think a lot of folks are jumping the gun with the Sony camera as the thing hasn't even been tested yet, but that's the internet for you.

I've been with Canon since '97 and so it's with great apprehension that I would even consider jumping ship. I'm hanging tight until "the next big thing" as I really only upgrade bodies every other generation.

Thanks for the warm welcome?   ;)


Sorry I wasn't trying to be mean. It's just, after a while you read the complaints on here about Canon not doing this or not making that and it just gets old. It can drive you nuts sometimes thinking of gear when we should (me included) be out taking amazing pictures with our existing equipment (which isn't too shabby!).

My 550D still takes pretty decent pictures, as long as there's good light.

This retro thing and smaller body is just a marketing thing. It's created a need that wasn't there before. Think about it, how did we get by before with all our gigantic cameras? Just fine. Making it smaller has no clear advantage for me since my lenses are all quite large anyway (and I have big hands that don't grip small cameras too good!). And I have no interest in buying a whole new system of lenses (even if they were Canon). Hey but that's just me.

I'm satisfied but also curious enough to see what Canon has in store, as it will be the tech that I'll likely be using in a couple of years time. I think what they've done so far with the 6D and cleaner high ISO is encouraging. I'm a big fan of high ISO usability. Also a fan of built in radio on speedlites (another Canon first). Dual pixel AF is also a welcome innovation, but one I don't personally use (wouldn't say no to it!).

So, recap. Glad the R&D dollars (yen?) aren't going into making mirrorless retro fashion statements and are (probably) going into something that improves IQ.


442
Canon General / Re: What's Next for Canon?
« on: October 21, 2013, 11:41:31 AM »
I'm pretty disappointed in Canon. Nothing has really been released that has me reaching for my wallet. No Fuji fighter mirrorless and no D800E killer (the only thing that might keep me in the brand).

Meanwhile "the other guys" look like they're dropping a Vintage looking body with a D4 sensor in it.

http://nikonrumors.com/2013/10/20/update-the-new-full-frame-retro-nikon-camera-will-have-f-mount-and-pentaprism.aspx/

This is the first time where I'm start to feel like I'm on the wrong boat.


Tell me, why do you feel the need for a "vintage body" all of a sudden? What is this fascination? Frankly, I' glad Canon aren't just jumping on the retro bandwagon to make a few bucks (with my luck they'll announce a retro body tomorrow and I'll be eating my words!!).

Here's an idea - don't complain that you can't spend your money fast enough. Give it to me if it bothers you!

 ;D

443
Technical Support / Re: Brick Wall.
« on: October 21, 2013, 11:32:44 AM »
Hey Paul, sorry to hear you're so down. I hate to see truly talented and creative people give up on something they love. I had a mate who almost packed it in and he was the one who got me started!

I think most of us have been in a similar position at some stage or another. As photogos we constantly crave inspiration and new ideas for projects. Given the time there are things I would like to do but I have to keep the girlfriend entertained, as I call it. They need attention and it's always a compromise unless they love what you love.

You should set aside time for you only. Say, right Friday is my day and I just want to do my thing, alone. I mean if you were a writer would she stand over your shoulder and watch? No. Hobbies are personal. We do them to make ourselves happy and when we try and compromise our hobby time we get annoyed. Nothing good comes from being annoyed.

My GF complains about me taking ages, getting "the shot" but she understands what it means to me. I'm a perfectionist. She's calmed down an lot and I even gave her my 550D so she has something to do on holidays etc.

I used to take a lot of pictures but now when I go out I just try and relax, enjoy life but I'm still observing and studying light and constantly thinking of "shots". Then when I get that feeling (you know the one) when you get that idea and you just have to experinent and see; thats when the camera comes out.

Also I have a co-worker who is getting into photography right now and I guess am kinda his sempai. It helps to have someone you can teach and learn from. I like his enthusiasm - he just bought his first flash and he's constantly trying to bounce it off various surfaces. I smile and give pointers like "needs a 1/2 CTO" when it doesn't work! I remember when it was all new and I was discovering light.

So, I guess my idea is to redeiscover what you loved about it and do it. And see things from someone elses view. Have them take pictures of you. See how it feels. Guide them and create something together.

Whatever you do am sure you'll bounce back!

(Or come to Japan for a visit, loads of amazing stuff to shoot here!)

444
EOS Bodies / Re: What do you think will be the Shelf life of the EOS 6D ?
« on: October 19, 2013, 12:17:59 PM »

Hmmm good point. I wonder as the 6D is more of a budget FF and not quite as robust as other models such as the 7D or 5D class. That was one reason I went with the 5D2. I'd rather have something solid.


I just don't understand this 'the 6D is more flimsy than the 5D II' nonsense on the web. I presume it stems from the fact the 6D has a polymer top plate, is smaller, lighter and is 'entry level'.

I have both and the accusation is nonsense. You just can't tell the difference in the top plate. I would put them both on the same level. In fact it is my guess that the 6D uses a lot of parts from the 5D mkII. They both have a plastic LCD cover as opposed to the toughened glass on the 5DIII and 7D etc etc. The 5D III is definitely a couple of steps up in construction from the II.

The 6D had had a few 'crippling' features to separate it; no LCD auto brightness for instance, but construction wise - they're the same.

I dunno, if I were to bash someone over the head with my 5D it would likely come out on top, I just wouldn't feel as confident weilding a 6D!  ;D

Also - i never used the word flimsy. I said not as robust. And I wrapped up with .... Would last 10 years. None of that sounds flimsy.

I agree that the 5D would be more suitable for bashing someone over the head, but as I'm not from Scotland I don't see this as normal photographic technique. Also it would really screw up your camera's AF module.

I was using writer's license when using the word 'flimsy', and wasn't referring to your post alone. I think it is the fact that the 5D is larger that makes it feel different too.

 ;D ;D ;D


445
EOS Bodies / Re: What do you think will be the Shelf life of the EOS 6D ?
« on: October 19, 2013, 05:19:09 AM »

Hmmm good point. I wonder as the 6D is more of a budget FF and not quite as robust as other models such as the 7D or 5D class. That was one reason I went with the 5D2. I'd rather have something solid.


I just don't understand this 'the 6D is more flimsy than the 5D II' nonsense on the web. I presume it stems from the fact the 6D has a polymer top plate, is smaller, lighter and is 'entry level'.

I have both and the accusation is nonsense. You just can't tell the difference in the top plate. I would put them both on the same level. In fact it is my guess that the 6D uses a lot of parts from the 5D mkII. They both have a plastic LCD cover as opposed to the toughened glass on the 5DIII and 7D etc etc. The 5D III is definitely a couple of steps up in construction from the II.

The 6D had had a few 'crippling' features to separate it; no LCD auto brightness for instance, but construction wise - they're the same.

I dunno, if I were to bash someone over the head with my 5D it would likely come out on top, I just wouldn't feel as confident weilding a 6D!  ;D

Also - i never used the word flimsy. I said not as robust. And I wrapped up with .... Would last 10 years. None of that sounds flimsy.



446
EOS Bodies / Re: What do you think will be the Shelf life of the EOS 6D ?
« on: October 19, 2013, 03:43:57 AM »
I was wondering if you could give your opinion on that? ???

While I realize the OP is talking about the marketing lifecycle, I am curious about the real shelf-life of the product.

Since the move to RoHS in electronics, I am seeing more and more devices fail for no apparent reason - some of which have literally just sat on the shelf.  So this begs the question: has anyone experienced any hardware failures in older cameras, or worse in more recent ones, that cannot be explained by external issues?

I have a Rollei TLR that is over 80 years old, and it takes marvelous photos.  Will my 5D3 still be functional in 10 years, never mind 80?

Thoughts on that?

Hmmm good point. I wonder as the 6D is more of a budget FF and not quite as robust as other models such as the 7D or 5D class. That was one reason I went with the 5D2. I'd rather have something solid. Recently all the stuff we buy is so poorly made I wonder if it's on purpose. We pay more for crap. What gives? We had a microwave oven that lasted over 15 years. Still worked fine but we "upgraded". The new one lasted about a year and a half.

And it's not just ovens. Things just seem to fall apart easier. My iPad case is crumbling like a shortbread biscuit in hot tea. I need new earphones every few months.

However, I've not had any Canon related failures. Even my Yongnuo flash took a fall and survived without a scratch. Can't see a 6D breaking down that easily as even the rebels have a long lifespan. My guess is 10 years at least with moderate use.

447
Lighting / Re: Why was Godox first to think of this?
« on: October 19, 2013, 02:29:32 AM »

Exactly - you'd buy another Godox flash or another Godox battery. You'll need Godox's charger as well, e.g. buy a Godox charger if the one you got with the flash is lost or broken. If you take your equipment on a trip, you need to take another charger with you.

As always this is my $0.02 but I can live without being tied to a peculiar battery and charger if I can help it.  If both the batteries and chargers were reasonably economical then the choice between this and the 600EX-RT would be a question of what the flash can do for me, but right now it is a question of what I have to do for the flash.

Jim

Would be pretty sweet if the 600ex rt took LP E6 batteries! Then you'd only need one charger!

When I go on a trip I always take my eneloop charger anyway. Wouldn't make any difference if it was a separate charger.

Personally, I hate trying to charge 8-12 batteries, especially when on a trip. I had to buy two chargers to speed up the process. And the flashes don't even have a battery gauge so you're always paranoid and over preparing with extra batteries. This Godox flash has two major advantages then. A power level gauge and a rechargeable battery. Together that is a smart combo.

These are basic things but only now we're seeing them. What gives? Do the people who make these things never use them? Look at the Lumopro 180 now that was designed and developed with a photographer (forgot his name).

Look at all the stupid ways we attach gels to our flash. No flash maker ever thought "oh hang on, how are they gonna gel this puppy?" And maybe even make some gels of their own that fit!

Seriously but, were speedliters just firing on camera, ungelled flash directly at people for the past two decades? Of course not. Listen to the users!

Rant over.

448
Lighting / Re: Why was Godox first to think of this?
« on: October 19, 2013, 02:15:40 AM »
I appreciate the weight savings, but I'll take the latitude to run on alkalines if I need to do so.  My $0.02.  I wonder why the battery pack isn't shaped like the usual 4 AAs?  That seems like a good idea sitting here.

Jim

I use rechargeable Sanyo eneloops. I didn't think anyone used Alkaline anymore!

I don't, I have rechargeables for all of mine; Still I appreciate being able to fall back to something if I somehow get sideways.  This is part of why I have battery grips for both of my smaller bodies too.

Jim

I know what you mean, it's like a safety net just incase you forget to insert the batteries the night before! (Always paranoid it's going to happen before a big shoot!).

I've never liked the idea of battery grips. I'd rather just chuck an extra battery in my bag. The 5D2 and 7D battery lp e6 last forever. I think I could get 500 + shots easily from one, maybe even 700. With 2 you could shoot a wedding. However, I guess it depends what kinda stuff you do like timelapse etc.

Number of times I've had to change the battery in one day of shooting is almost zero. Sometime all I need is 5D2, lens one battery and 32Gb memory card and I'm set for a walkabout.

449
TS-E 90mm f/2.8
That's a rare call for the 90 TS-E. For fashion & beauty? I have the 90 TS-E f/2.8 and while it's really useful for products & some static subjects, for dynamic shoots that fashion and beauty really SHOULD be, the manual focus of the 90 TS-E makes it a non-starter. No IS as well...

OP should be happy as a cricket with a 100L Macro f/2.8, which BTW, is my next lens purchase. It's my 135 f/2 which is languishing on the studio shelf, largely because my shooting style benefits so much from good IS.

-pw

Agree, IS on any lens over 85mm is essential for me (even 50mm would be nice). I love the 135L but most of the large aperture adv is negated by having to keep it above or near 1/160s. I'm losin out on those dimly lit backgrounds even with flash. Ambient light is rarely 1/160! Great for outdoors though!

What anyone would need a TS in fashion is beyond my scope of understanding but I'll take a guess.

The models are particularly tall and require a shift to correct distortion.
Or just to keep the subject all in sharp focus no matter the angle?
Or for selective focus effects.

I wish I had bought the macro instead of the 135L now that I think about it. Then again I'm not a macro guy. For OP it's perfect.


450
Lighting / Re: Why was Godox first to think of this?
« on: October 19, 2013, 01:46:17 AM »
I appreciate the weight savings, but I'll take the latitude to run on alkalines if I need to do so.  My $0.02.  I wonder why the battery pack isn't shaped like the usual 4 AAs?  That seems like a good idea sitting here.

Jim

I use rechargeable Sanyo eneloops. I didn't think anyone used Alkaline anymore!

The battery life on the Li-Ion pack would outstrip the need for any additional batteries, wouldn't it? I mean if you run out of battery mid way through a shoot you're hardly gonna pop out to the shops to buy more batteries. You'd plan ahead and make sure you either had a spare flash ready to go (what I do) or a spare battery. I'm sure Godox would sell additional battieries. Just two would suffice for even the most demanding jobs like a wedding.

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