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Author Topic: Show your Bird Portraits  (Read 5594129 times)

wildlifeandmore

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5040 on: April 02, 2014, 09:59:27 AM »
Perched Golden Juvenile Bald Eagle in the National Elk Refuge near Jackson Wyoming
1D IV
500mm f/4L IS with 1.4x (700mm)
f/6.3
1/2000
320 iso

Here is another shot telling.  The feet tell me that he is most likely a Golden Eagle.  What do you think?  Golden or Juvenile Bald Eagle?
« Last Edit: April 03, 2014, 01:20:40 PM by wildlifeandmore »

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5040 on: April 02, 2014, 09:59:27 AM »

mackguyver

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5041 on: April 02, 2014, 10:18:04 AM »
North & Click - thank you for the nice comments!

HankMD - congrats on your first owl!!!  It's so exciting to finally see one considering how hard they are to find.  I've been looking for this little guy in my yard for months and I've seen him fly by and heard him almost daily but it took me that long to finally find him.  That's a really interesting owl you shot - I've never even heard of the species.

Jack - 30 years?  Wow, that's too long.  My guess is that a lot of owls have seen you over those years, though!  I say that because whenever I come back from my nature shoots, I always wonder how many snakes, alligators, and owls have seen me :)  These stealthy creatures are SO hard to find.

You hand held a 600 mm focal length at 1/30th?? Amazing IS. Does the 50% size stand up ?
Yes, and you can click on the photo (the original one, above) and view the EXIF if you have a viewer - I use FxIF for Firefox - if you don't believe me :)

My technique for still (or relatively still) critters in low light is to get the shot, then start dropping the ISO until I can't get a sharp photo.  ISO 1600 was that point for me, and I also fire off 3 or 4 frames as the shutter speed drops in the hopes of getting at least one sharp frame.  My rate was 2/3 frames at 1/30s so yes, the IS (mode 3) was working brilliantly!  The owl was up really high so even at 600mm I had to crop a lot (final file is only 1622 x 2433)  The 50% zoom holds up decently well - probably good enough for an 8x10" but that's probably the biggest I'd try to print it.  I have attached the 50% zoom below.
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Sporgon

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5042 on: April 02, 2014, 11:24:55 AM »

You hand held a 600 mm focal length at 1/30th?? Amazing IS. Does the 50% size stand up ?

Yes, and you can click on the photo (the original one, above) and view the EXIF if you have a viewer - I use FxIF for Firefox - if you don't believe me :)

My technique for still (or relatively still) critters in low light is to get the shot, then start dropping the ISO until I can't get a sharp photo.  ISO 1600 was that point for me, and I also fire off 3 or 4 frames as the shutter speed drops in the hopes of getting at least one sharp frame.  My rate was 2/3 frames at 1/30s so yes, the IS (mode 3) was working brilliantly!  The owl was up really high so even at 600mm I had to crop a lot (final file is only 1622 x 2433)  The 50% zoom holds up decently well - probably good enough for an 8x10" but that's probably the biggest I'd try to print it.  I have attached the 50% zoom below.

Really impressive, both the engineering of the lens and your technique !

( I'm off to see which IS version the 300 f2.8 II has  ;)  )

mackguyver

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5043 on: April 02, 2014, 12:15:34 PM »

You hand held a 600 mm focal length at 1/30th?? Amazing IS. Does the 50% size stand up ?

Yes, and you can click on the photo (the original one, above) and view the EXIF if you have a viewer - I use FxIF for Firefox - if you don't believe me :)

My technique for still (or relatively still) critters in low light is to get the shot, then start dropping the ISO until I can't get a sharp photo.  ISO 1600 was that point for me, and I also fire off 3 or 4 frames as the shutter speed drops in the hopes of getting at least one sharp frame.  My rate was 2/3 frames at 1/30s so yes, the IS (mode 3) was working brilliantly!  The owl was up really high so even at 600mm I had to crop a lot (final file is only 1622 x 2433)  The 50% zoom holds up decently well - probably good enough for an 8x10" but that's probably the biggest I'd try to print it.  I have attached the 50% zoom below.

Really impressive, both the engineering of the lens and your technique !

( I'm off to see which IS version the 300 f2.8 II has  ;)  )
Thanks and yes, the IS (latest gen) in the lens is truly amazing.  A tripod would have been too slow and it and a monopod would have both been quite tricky as the owl was almost straight over my head.
CPS Score: 111 points, those 0 and 1 point items really add up

Jack Douglas

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5044 on: April 02, 2014, 12:36:28 PM »
mackguyver, thanks for the advice.  My friend who influenced me back into photography via the Nikon D5100 DSLR is always commenting along the lines of "you can't expect to get a sharp shot unless you're 1/FL" (both of us have 300 2.8 IS but me a year and he just a month now).  But now am going to use your technique provided my subjects cooperate, and fire more shots. 

Now that I've played with my new old 1D2 a bit, I've come to realize how valuable the 6D auto ISO is, and oh, how did anyone live with that 1D2 LCD display!  We're spoiled with these newer cameras and lenses. ;)

Yes there are critters watching and that's why when I'm finally aching and exhausted from being immobile I typically tell myself, just 5 more minutes and ever so carefully start to move, looking everywhere.  My beaver shooting, two years ago, proved to me how carefully he was watching me from up close, with me not knowing.  Whoosh!  Squirrels love to watch too.

Even funnier, I was leaving my spot in the bush and had to relieve myself (badly), so I'm standing there watering the the brush forever with the 300 X2 kind of over my back and looking around 200 degrees and there well within good shooting range is a very young fawn who bounded away just as I finished my business and started fumbling for the camera.  Fortunately, he/she never reported me to the authorities. :)

Jack
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mackguyver

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5045 on: April 02, 2014, 02:12:28 PM »
mackguyver, thanks for the advice.  My friend who influenced me back into photography via the Nikon D5100 DSLR is always commenting along the lines of "you can't expect to get a sharp shot unless you're 1/FL" (both of us have 300 2.8 IS but me a year and he just a month now).  But now am going to use your technique provided my subjects cooperate, and fire more shots. 

Now that I've played with my new old 1D2 a bit, I've come to realize how valuable the 6D auto ISO is, and oh, how did anyone live with that 1D2 LCD display!  We're spoiled with these newer cameras and lenses. ;)

Yes there are critters watching and that's why when I'm finally aching and exhausted from being immobile I typically tell myself, just 5 more minutes and ever so carefully start to move, looking everywhere.  My beaver shooting, two years ago, proved to me how carefully he was watching me from up close, with me not knowing.  Whoosh!  Squirrels love to watch too.

Even funnier, I was leaving my spot in the bush and had to relieve myself (badly), so I'm standing there watering the the brush forever with the 300 X2 kind of over my back and looking around 200 degrees and there well within good shooting range is a very young fawn who bounded away just as I finished my business and started fumbling for the camera.  Fortunately, he/she never reported me to the authorities. :)

Jack
I have taken many of my best shots as I was leaving or when I stayed five more minutes, too, so I completely understand.  It's almost like I should just stand around for a few hours before I start shooting sometimes :).  The new cameras are spoiling us and the high ISO really makes for exciting opportunities.  Back when I had my 450D/XSi and 400 f/5.6, I would have to wait until the sun had been up at least 30 minutes to get useable shots - now I can shoot before the sun is up - or after it sets!

Your fawn story is really interesting, because it just so happens that I had an extremely similar experience. I was hiking near a river just before dawn when I, well, had to go.  As I finished, a fawn darting away and I swear it was no more than 4 feet from me!  It really surprised me and it was too dark to shot (yes, I had the old gear), but was a great experience.  A minute or two later, it's mother came charging through the woods towards me and really gave me a scare.  She was huge and not happy with me, but thankfully there was a narrow creek separating us and she didn't cross it.  Considering the many dangerous creatures I shoot, the fact that a deer is the only one that has ever come after me is pretty funny!

To avoid steering the thread off course, here's another backyard visitor, a red-shouldered hawk, also taken in low light and hand held.  Uncropped shot with the 5DIII & 400 f/5.6 at f/8 1/320s ISO 6400.  Just realized that I need to run this one through DxO PRIME now that I have that capability...

CPS Score: 111 points, those 0 and 1 point items really add up

Eldar

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5046 on: April 02, 2014, 03:33:09 PM »
Great Crested Grebe getting ready
1DX, 600mm f4L IS II + 1.4xIII extender
1/1000s, f6.3, ISO320

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5046 on: April 02, 2014, 03:33:09 PM »

ankarback

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5047 on: April 02, 2014, 04:06:31 PM »
Here's a Puffin I shot at the island Runde in Norway.
EOS-1D mk IV. Sigma 120-300mm F2.8 EX OS HSM. 1/1000 sec;   f/2,8;   ISO 1000


Valvebounce

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5048 on: April 02, 2014, 08:24:36 PM »
Hi Mackguyver.
Beautiful shot.
Are you a mechanoid, do you have no pulse or do you just stop your heart whilst you hand hold your 600mm 1/30 sec shots?  :D What do you think your oops cost you, 1 stop, 1/2 a stop? What would you have done with it, reduced ISO or faster shutter?

Cheers Graham.

The dove shots are all great, and while I don't have any to share, I finally tracked down the little guy in my yard who keeps waking me up in the morning and serenading me with his hoots each evening.  He was way, way up high, but I snagged him with my 300 + 2x with (OOPS!) circular polarizer.  It was dusk but I didn't think it was THAT dark!  Luckily the IS allowed me to handhold at 1/30s allowing me to use ISO 1600 instead of 25600!  Note to self - remove CIR-PLs from all lenses before I pack my lenses to come home.  Now I need to get a better shot of him - tripod / Better Beamer will be at the ready for his next visit!


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Jack Douglas

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5049 on: April 02, 2014, 09:05:38 PM »
Especially like the Grebes!  Cool birds and nice shot.

Jack
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brad-man

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5050 on: April 02, 2014, 10:51:34 PM »
Too many great shots here. Time to lower the standards...

Rienzphotoz

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5051 on: April 02, 2014, 11:10:36 PM »
Too many great shots here. Time to lower the standards...
What "lower the standards"? ... the image you posted here is superb and worthy of praise, it isn't always about sharpness and other technicalities ... the image you posted here has drama and is compelling with all those crocs eyeing the bird ... SUPERB timing!
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jrda2

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5052 on: April 03, 2014, 12:56:40 AM »
Perched Golden Eagle in the National Elk Refuge near Jackson


Here is another shot telling.  The feet tell me that he is most likely a Golden Eagle.  What do you think?  Golden or Juvenile Bald Eagle?


I believe this is a juvenile bald eagle.  The beak/ bill is larger and more characteristic of a bald eagle, the feathering does not go all the way down the leg as shown in the second pic, and the wing markings also look like a young bald eagle.  Either way they are neat pics- I like the second one where it likes like he is relaxed and stretching.

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5052 on: April 03, 2014, 12:56:40 AM »

candyman

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5053 on: April 03, 2014, 01:31:42 AM »
Too many great shots here. Time to lower the standards...
What "lower the standards"? ... the image you posted here is superb and worthy of praise, it isn't always about sharpness and other technicalities ... the image you posted here has drama and is compelling with all those crocs eyeing the bird ... SUPERB timing!
+1
Yes excellent timing with a great subject
The more you look, the more you see ─ Robert M. Pirsig


CarlTN

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5054 on: April 03, 2014, 07:49:32 AM »
6D, 400mm, f/6.3, very heavily cropped 1:1, 1/1250 sec, ISO 6400 (needed exposure boost by 2/3, plus shadows lift, and some sharpening, so actual noise level was really as if it were more than 12,800!!  Just a ton of luminance noise...but radically less than my 50D had, even at ISO 2000!).  I tried various NR techniques in LR, including the adjustment brush.  I think it's decent overall but not compared to shots done in better light (obviously...besides the feeder is ugly, oh well).  However, this shot is probably the most pixels I've had on a hummingbird as of yet, so I edited and shared anyway.  Shot summer 2013.  And hey, it's a female...she has a nice body!

Oh, and I almost forgot, this was shot through double pane window glass!
« Last Edit: April 03, 2014, 07:54:47 AM by CarlTN »

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Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« Reply #5054 on: April 03, 2014, 07:49:32 AM »