October 20, 2014, 10:31:02 PM

Author Topic: Panning  (Read 4316 times)

J.R.

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Panning
« on: April 20, 2014, 09:22:47 AM »
I tried some panning shots today. Gear used was 5D Mark III and the 70-200 II. I shot a reasonable number of images today and these are two of the few shots that I liked. The first shot is at ISO 50, 70mm, f/2.8 at 1/50s. The second shot is at ISO 100, 70mm, f/2.8 and 1/60s. The lens was in IS Mode II.

Issues -
1) I wasn't able to generate a more streaking background despite shutter speeds which I thought were reasonably low;
2) Dropping the shutter speed lower resulted in an extremely poor hit rate;

Please suggest as to how can I improve my panning technique.

Thanks in advance,

Regards ... J.R.
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Panning
« on: April 20, 2014, 09:22:47 AM »

yorgasor

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Re: Panning
« Reply #1 on: April 20, 2014, 03:09:28 PM »
These two shots look fantastic.  Don't be discouraged by low hit rates, panning takes a bit of practice to get down.  I think the most important thing to get right is sliding the camera perfectly horizontal with your subject.  There was a discussion just a few days ago on shooting with large lenses, and I think many of the tips there will help out here.

You'll need a good, steady stance, one foot forward, with your body kind of sideways to the subject, with your arm resting against your body.  I suspect you'll get smoother horizontal motion if you just twist with your waist rather than your arms.  Try practicing with that and see if you can get a few hits at 1/30s, as that's where the real magic is. 

Now you've got me wanting to go out and practice on my kids as they ride their bikes around :)  Thanks for the inspiration.

neuroanatomist

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Re: Panning
« Reply #2 on: April 20, 2014, 11:06:15 PM »
Slower is better.    At f/2.8, you're getting both motion blur and OOF blur in the background.  Here's one from a sunny day where I should have brought an ND filter, 70mm (with the 24-70 II), 1/40 s and f/18 (so the blur is all motion).
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ahab1372

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Re: Panning
« Reply #3 on: April 20, 2014, 11:17:32 PM »
both girls a standing on their bikes, so they will most likely bounce up and down. With longer shutter speeds, you will have inevitably motion blur on their faces. If they sat down, you may get away with longer shutter speeds.
Another way to get more blur is the subject moving faster - but I'm not sure moms like it when you yell at the kids "faster faster"  :P

privatebydesign

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Re: Panning
« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2014, 12:04:19 AM »
J.R.

As you were with IS mode II, and Servo AF with one AF point selected, put that point on the face before it gets to where you want the image shot, steadily hold that AF point on the face until you get to where you want it, then gently press the shutter, keep the fluid motion going right through the shot and after, like a golfers follow through. Lots and lots of practice.

I do lots of panning street shots, here are a couple from Vietnam a few years ago. The two girls on the bike are 1/125 sec at f5.6 with a 16-35 @20mm, the man and women on the trike are 1/6 at f7.1 with a 50 f1.4.
« Last Edit: April 21, 2014, 12:10:20 AM by privatebydesign »
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Dylan777

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Re: Panning
« Reply #5 on: April 21, 2014, 12:27:52 AM »
1st photo looks good to me :)
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mb66energy

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Re: Panning
« Reply #6 on: April 21, 2014, 03:55:43 AM »
I tried some panning shots today. Gear used was 5D Mark III and the 70-200 II. I shot a reasonable number of images today and these are two of the few shots that I liked. The first shot is at ISO 50, 70mm, f/2.8 at 1/50s. The second shot is at ISO 100, 70mm, f/2.8 and 1/60s. The lens was in IS Mode II.

Issues -
1) I wasn't able to generate a more streaking background despite shutter speeds which I thought were reasonably low;
2) Dropping the shutter speed lower resulted in an extremely poor hit rate;

Please suggest as to how can I improve my panning technique.

Thanks in advance,

Regards ... J.R.

Try an external viewfinder - to enhance tracking over longer periods, just an idea.
 Or use a tripod if you can control the path of the subject in someways: With a ball head lock the ball and use the panning capability of the base of the head (e.g.).

 Never checked it both measures work ... just time for me to do that soon :)
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Re: Panning
« Reply #6 on: April 21, 2014, 03:55:43 AM »

wickidwombat

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Re: Panning
« Reply #7 on: April 21, 2014, 07:51:28 AM »
for bicycles going slow like that i'd go with 1/15 to 1/30th

Just finished the shanghai F1 and I discovered the tamron 150-600 IS sucks balls for panning  so i had to turn IS off
i shot most stuff at 1/200 and got a reasonable hit rate, also had some decent at 1/160 and tried 1/100 for more streaking with a considerably lower hit rate.

As for technique, it just needs tons of practice

first off brace your left elbow into your ribs and let the lens barrel rest on your left palm
next make sure you also keep your right elbow tucked in but dont squeeze everything too tight this will just add shake so be relaxed about it.
next make sure your stance is stable balanced and comfortable
to pan keep your legs and torso all firm and just use your waist to pivot.
begin tracking early and make sure your movement is smooth
i find with race cars you can get a nice smooth rythem going and once you hit the groove the keeper rate comes up

but panning at 600mm and 1/100th with no IS is a bitch :P
sample shot on the back straight attached 100% crop shot from the top row of the main grandstand
« Last Edit: April 21, 2014, 07:55:59 AM by wickidwombat »
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wickidwombat

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Re: Panning
« Reply #8 on: April 21, 2014, 08:01:08 AM »
and heres one at 300mm un cropped on the main straight 1/200 this time the day before during qualifying in the rain
which added really nicely to all the shots i think
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Re: Panning
« Reply #9 on: April 21, 2014, 12:03:41 PM »
Wombat -- Bravo!! Gorgeous F1 stuff. Good for you!
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Dylan777

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Re: Panning
« Reply #10 on: April 21, 2014, 05:33:48 PM »
Great shots wickidwombat ;)
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dcm

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Re: Panning
« Reply #11 on: April 21, 2014, 05:45:25 PM »
It helps to put more distance between your subject and the background, less between you and the subject.  This magnifies the movement of the background to create more motion blur.
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J.R.

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Re: Panning
« Reply #12 on: April 21, 2014, 09:38:56 PM »
Thanks a lot for the replies. I'll keep in mind your suggestions the next time I shoot ... can't wait for this weekend.

Slower is better.    At f/2.8, you're getting both motion blur and OOF blur in the background.  Here's one from a sunny day where I should have brought an ND filter, 70mm (with the 24-70 II), 1/40 s and f/18 (so the blur is all motion).

Thanks, I see your point.

BTW, do you also mean to say that a narrower aperture (than f/2.8) should be preferably used to accentuate streaking lines?

Another way to get more blur is the subject moving faster - but I'm not sure moms like it when you yell at the kids "faster faster"  :P

Haha ... I was shooting right outside my house and when I suggested this to my daughters, I got shouted down by my wife from the window above   :'(

As you were with IS mode II, and Servo AF with one AF point selected, put that point on the face before it gets to where you want the image shot, steadily hold that AF point on the face until you get to where you want it, then gently press the shutter, keep the fluid motion going right through the shot and after, like a golfers follow through. Lots and lots of practice.


I was actually in multiple AF point selection mode. The focus was on the faces of my daughters.

BTW, you got motion blur in your shots at 1/125s! I can see what is possible if one gets his technique right.


Try an external viewfinder - to enhance tracking over longer periods, just an idea.
 Or use a tripod if you can control the path of the subject in someways: With a ball head lock the ball and use the panning capability of the base of the head (e.g.).

 Never checked it both measures work ... just time for me to do that soon :)


I've never used an external viewfinder but I'll try to find out more.

I was actually thinking of camera mounted on monopod, used in sitting / kneeling position. I'm not sure it'll work perfect but may be worth a try.

1st photo looks good to me :)

Thanks Dylan!

for bicycles going slow like that i'd go with 1/15 to 1/30th

As for technique, it just needs tons of practice

first off brace your left elbow into your ribs and let the lens barrel rest on your left palm
next make sure you also keep your right elbow tucked in but dont squeeze everything too tight this will just add shake so be relaxed about it.
next make sure your stance is stable balanced and comfortable
to pan keep your legs and torso all firm and just use your waist to pivot.
begin tracking early and make sure your movement is smooth
i find with race cars you can get a nice smooth rythem going and once you hit the groove the keeper rate comes up



First off, those are excellent shots!

Thanks for the suggestions. I typically shoot with both my elbows drawn in but don't really remember how I was moving for these shots. I may have ended up rotating the camera in my hands and will be more careful as to what I'm doing next time.

It helps to put more distance between your subject and the background, less between you and the subject.  This magnifies the movement of the background to create more motion blur.

Thanks.

Now you've got me thinking. I'll try using a shorter focal length while at the same time getting closer to the subject and see what happens. 
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Re: Panning
« Reply #12 on: April 21, 2014, 09:38:56 PM »

wickidwombat

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Re: Panning
« Reply #13 on: April 21, 2014, 10:04:58 PM »
I found when learning to pan it was easiest using a 50mm prime stopped down to f8 and going with pretty slow speeds and just working on the body movement stance and technique. Forget everything else at first the step up to the 70-200 once you can pan with no IS then the more 2 IS should be a cake walk once you have the technique sorted.
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Re: Panning
« Reply #14 on: April 22, 2014, 03:53:44 PM »
Try it at night with terrible lighting.  It's kind of fun.



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Re: Panning
« Reply #14 on: April 22, 2014, 03:53:44 PM »