December 19, 2014, 11:04:48 PM

Author Topic: first attempts at macro stacking, let's see some stuff. (beginners only please)  (Read 7992 times)

CTJohn

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Not my favorite technique as I don't have the tools (proper focus rails), software (I use PS, Helicon and others made me crazy), or patience, but here's one of my more successful attempts that was necessary - it's a Maypop flower - really odd to me, but apparently an extremely common flower/weed 180mm macro @f/8, 1/800s, ISO 800:

Awesome!  The flower explodes out of the image.
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AcutancePhotography

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Freezing an insect prior to shooting it, while not something I would do is not really worthy of nut-kicking.

Spraying hairspray on an insect, does warrant a double nut-kick.  LoL
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CTJohn

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12 images, using 430EXII in softbox plus reflector for lighting.  6D, EF100 f/2.8L lens.
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mackguyver

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Not my favorite technique as I don't have the tools (proper focus rails), software (I use PS, Helicon and others made me crazy), or patience, but here's one of my more successful attempts that was necessary - it's a Maypop flower - really odd to me, but apparently an extremely common flower/weed 180mm macro @f/8, 1/800s, ISO 800:

Awesome!  The flower explodes out of the image.
CTJohn and chrysoberyl - thanks!  The funny thing about this is that I had never seen one of these before and thought I had found some really rare flower.  I later discovered it's an extremely common flower in the Southern United States...oh well, I like the photo, which was taken with the 180L macro.

Also, tolusina, I'm sorry, I didn't catch your comment before - this was actually my first attempt at focus stacking, so for this technique, I'm a total beginner.  My only other attempt was with the 7-200 f/2.8 IS II and it's about as un-parfocal as they come so the framing changed a whole lot (way more than your very cool GIF) and I didn't even try to stack it. 

CTJohn, that's a great example of how to do it right - beautiful shot!

Forceflow and Menace - I love your shots as well!  This is a really cool thread.

Famateur

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Here some examples of mine...

Forceflow, this series is just brilliant! The burning wick? Spectacular. A perfect example of what makes macro photography so captivating -- seeing detail in things one has seen a million times but had no idea how it really looks...

bjd

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Re: first attempt at stacking macro shots :: )
« Reply #50 on: July 11, 2014, 12:46:11 PM »

I sort of noticed the funny side of Menace's comment, you know the bit where someone freezes the subject to the point they are slow to move, then shoots them ?? shoots them ?? see the funny side at all ?? No ? must be an Aussie Kiwi thing.

Being a Brit I noticed it straight away too.

Many types of live insect bait are kept in the fridge, when you take them out and they warm up they seem OK.
Not saying that they enjoy it though. I guess they'll see it as a snap frost or something

Cheers Brian

danski0224

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Notice how the frames march closer as focus gets closer as though the lens zoomed.
I actually think it did zoom but I'm clueless how and/or why.

As you change the focus in a macro lens, the magnification changes.

You can see it if you turn off AF, prefocus at the "further" range, move in manually until the object is in focus, then repeat closer in. The object will become larger in the viewfinder.

The magnification ratios are different, and that is printed on the focus scale (1.5:1, 1.2:1,1:1- or however they are laid out).

I believe the technical term is focus breathing- could be wrong.

The only way to keep the magnification the same and change the focus point is to preset your focus, turn off AF and move the camera in/out to focus the desired point. Best way to move the camera is with a set of gear driven (manual or motorized) focus rails. Any precision or repeatability without a gear driven system is damn near impossible.

I have a set of rails and have messed with an MPE-65, and I can see the focus change as the setup is moved on the rails. It doesn't take much movement. Apparent magnification (object size) does not change. Moving the tripod in and out proved to be useless.

I found it quite interesting, but it is very time consuming.

I suspect that the apps using focus stacking vs rail movement are stretching/shrinking the sharp parts of the image to blend it together for the final result with assumed quality loss (small image is expanded and large final image is shrunk). I would assume it picks somewhere in the middle as a starting point for final image size/scale.

There is a lot of skill in a good focus stacked image.

Some of my Work in Progress..... www.dftimages.com

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Cinto

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Taken with Magic Lantern Focus stacking, 5D MarkII and Sigma 150(non-IS). It is quick to do a stack, probably good for insects.

alexturton

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 My first attempt.i went ambitious

 This was a 27 shot stack of a wasp using a demo I downloaded of helicon focus.

The wasp wasn't dead so as I was taking this my heart was pounding and I was terrified as his feelers kept twitching. There is a bit of movement in the stitch but I'm pleased with my first effort.

As daft as it sounds, I'm always amazed these creatures have faces.

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Northstar

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Taken with Magic Lantern Focus stacking, 5D MarkII and Sigma 150(non-IS). It is quick to do a stack, probably good for insects.

Beautiful!
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Larry

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These two were swinging about next to the TV so I grabbed a few shots (hand held with external flash) and combined 3 in Zerene Stacker.  Woodlouse was already very dead but the spider was nice enough to stay still.  I've never worked out how to shoot these spiders from a flattering angle - anyone managed it?



As far as I'm concerned, there is no such thing as a flattering angle for any spider!  :o  ;)

Maybe a shot a bit more from the side to emphasize the breasts?   ;D

Larry

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Re: first attempt at stacking macro shots :: )
« Reply #56 on: July 12, 2014, 12:55:20 PM »

I sort of noticed the funny side of Menace's comment, you know the bit where someone freezes the subject to the point they are slow to move, then shoots them ?? shoots them ?? see the funny side at all ?? No ? must be an Aussie Kiwi thing.


If I am to be shot, please omit the pre-freezing! I will hold still.

Aussies, Kiwis, and some US-ians at least  ::) (Spider breasts, anyone? ...see my previous post.)

Menace

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Re: first attempt at stacking macro shots :: )
« Reply #57 on: July 12, 2014, 04:31:04 PM »

I sort of noticed the funny side of Menace's comment, you know the bit where someone freezes the subject to the point they are slow to move, then shoots them ?? shoots them ?? see the funny side at all ?? No ? must be an Aussie Kiwi thing.


If I am to be shot, please omit the pre-freezing! I will hold still.

Aussies, Kiwis, and some US-ians at least  ::) (Spider breasts, anyone? ...see my previous post.)

Thanks Larry for the heads up - I'll keep that in mind when you visit new zealand ;)
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Re: first attempt at stacking macro shots :: )
« Reply #57 on: July 12, 2014, 04:31:04 PM »

eml58

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12 images, using 430EXII in softbox plus reflector for lighting.  6D, EF100 f/2.8L lens.

Lovely Image, really I need to try this, great thread, some lovely Images.
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eml58

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Taken with Magic Lantern Focus stacking, 5D MarkII and Sigma 150(non-IS). It is quick to do a stack, probably good for insects.

That is an incredibly good Image, well done, honestly one of the best I've seen on CR, completely wowed me.
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