September 17, 2014, 09:45:03 AM

Author Topic: Ye Olde Film Photography  (Read 1805 times)

AcutancePhotography

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Re: Ye Olde Film Photography
« Reply #15 on: June 17, 2014, 08:20:25 AM »
I have many memories with film and chemical darkrooms.. some good memories, some not so good.  All in all I like digital photography.  I still have fantasies of adding a darkroom to my house.   ;D

The advantages of digital photography, for me, outweigh any advantages of film.

I am glad that I "cut my teeth" on film though.  I think it gave me (I can only speak for myself) some good experience and basic understanding of photography.  I am also glad I can take that hard earned experience and apply it to the digital age.  For me, it is the best of both worlds.

I do have to confess that there is nothing in the digital photography world that can match the awe of seeing your image *magicially* appear on paper in the developer. Despite the thousands of prints I have developed, I always looked in wonder at this chemical miracle.   ;)
I shoot with a Camera Obscura with an optical device attached that refracts and transmits light

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Re: Ye Olde Film Photography
« Reply #15 on: June 17, 2014, 08:20:25 AM »

NancyP

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Re: Ye Olde Film Photography
« Reply #16 on: June 17, 2014, 11:11:37 AM »
I wouldn't do 135-format film again. Large format - that's another matter. Bought in bulk (25 or 50), 4 x 5 B+W film averages between $0.75 (Foma) and $2.50 (Fuji Neopan Acros) each, with Ilford and Kodak being $1.25 to $1.50. So, it isn't hugely expensive to give it a try . You might shoot 8 to 12 on an outing, which equals 2 or 3 Starbucks fancy coffees. The cameras are more expensive: $150.00 for a camera, $150.00 for a very good older multi-coated lens plus board, film holders $5.00 each (holds 2 films).

Niki

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Re: Ye Olde Film Photography
« Reply #17 on: June 17, 2014, 01:17:36 PM »
love film…! 

digital is digital
film is film

use both and keep them competitive and evolving

TexasBadger

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Re: Ye Olde Film Photography
« Reply #18 on: June 17, 2014, 02:42:07 PM »
I started with film in the mid 70s and I am glad that I did.  There is something surreal about watching your print appear in the developer.  After a while, I moved on to pushing and pulling film.  I would push Ektachrome and Tri-X to increase ASA (That was what it was called then).  I would pull Tri-X to increase grey scale.  This was done by over exposing the image and then under developing it.  This was something Ansel Adams used to do.  Then you would develop the prints in a soft developer (Selectol-soft) and then in a hard developer (Dektol).  The results were great.

On to digital:
It took me a while to admit it, but now that I have developed my digital skills, I would never go back to film.  I can achieve very similar results using NIK plug-ins (Silver Efex Pro) within Photoshop.  The biggest advantage of digital is that I can get much sharper prints than I ever could with film.  It is also a huge advantage being able to correct the color temperature with a slider over using filters to compensate.

If I was teaching a photo class, I would start everyone in film and then switch to digital.  Knowing both really helps when it comes to printing images. 

I still have my film camera and enlarger for sentimental reasons.  I do not see myself using either again unless I want to shoot infrared or something like that.  So far it hasn't happened.
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marcel

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Re: Ye Olde Film Photography
« Reply #19 on: June 17, 2014, 02:46:02 PM »
"The one I'm aware of is that as film was an expensive medium, that offered limited shots, the photographers took their time composing a shot, thinking through all aspects before pulling the trigger."

For the limited shots you can always use only a 256 MB cf card on a Eos 1 DX, with the possibility to shoot only 4 frames you need to think and rethink before pulling the trigger! I have a 4 MB cf card, only one photo! This must be the top of the thinking think. I think.....





« Last Edit: June 17, 2014, 02:47:34 PM by marcel »
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SPL

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Re: Ye Olde Film Photography
« Reply #20 on: June 17, 2014, 03:23:08 PM »
I started with film also…developed my own film in college and for a few years after.  Always wanted to convert the downstairs bathroom into a darkroom, but never happened.  I miss it, it was a lot of fun, but digital is so much easier.  I did learn a lot and I think I can still kinda smell the chemicals today.  I agree with several people,…it was always very cool to see that image come to life in the developer tray.  For several months now, I have an itch to pick up a 500 CM and give 120 a try…

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Re: Ye Olde Film Photography
« Reply #20 on: June 17, 2014, 03:23:08 PM »