October 21, 2014, 05:10:46 AM

Author Topic: a thank you letter to Canon Rumors  (Read 8348 times)

kubelik

  • 1D Mark IV
  • ******
  • Posts: 797
    • View Profile
    • a teatray in the sky
a thank you letter to Canon Rumors
« on: January 18, 2012, 09:42:52 AM »
Dear All,

I wanted to thank Craig and the webmasters for posting the video that was up earlier and the link to anti-SOPA/PIPA petitions.  it's a bigger deal than a lot of people realize, and, if passed, will impact many more people than what most realize.  I understand it's a U.S. issue and that many of the users here are from around the world, but it's an issue that could just as easily find its way to Canada, the EU, or anywhere else in the world (for that matter, it's an issue that is already a major problem in Asia). 

I also understand that this isn't a political site, but I don't believe the SOPA/PIPA issue is a political one either; if anything, it is indicative of politicians in general not having sufficient technical understanding to properly address what are dicey real-world issues that require significant technical knowledge to properly understand the myriad consequences that several lines of legislation can have. 

I hope plenty of others from this site will go out in protest of this over-reaching and poorly written piece of top-down legislation.  I hope even more however, that we all realize that the world has become an incredibly complex and specialized place, and that it is through the continued sharing of knowledge that the global community as a whole can come to the right decisions.  thank you to everyone who contributes their knowledge to these forums (and to those who contribute tasty info to Craig), and please remember to share your varied expertise elsewhere as well as here!

Sincerely,

John

canon rumors FORUM

a thank you letter to Canon Rumors
« on: January 18, 2012, 09:42:52 AM »

bvukich

  • Spam Assassin
  • Administrator
  • 5D Mark III
  • *****
  • Posts: 733
    • View Profile
    • My (sparse) ZenFolio Site
Re: a thank you letter to Canon Rumors
« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2012, 10:52:30 AM »
Dear All,

I wanted to thank Craig and the webmasters for posting the video that was up earlier and the link to anti-SOPA/PIPA petitions.  it's a bigger deal than a lot of people realize, and, if passed, will impact many more people than what most realize.  I understand it's a U.S. issue and that many of the users here are from around the world, but it's an issue that could just as easily find its way to Canada, the EU, or anywhere else in the world (for that matter, it's an issue that is already a major problem in Asia). 

I also understand that this isn't a political site, but I don't believe the SOPA/PIPA issue is a political one either; if anything, it is indicative of politicians in general not having sufficient technical understanding to properly address what are dicey real-world issues that require significant technical knowledge to properly understand the myriad consequences that several lines of legislation can have. 

I hope plenty of others from this site will go out in protest of this over-reaching and poorly written piece of top-down legislation.  I hope even more however, that we all realize that the world has become an incredibly complex and specialized place, and that it is through the continued sharing of knowledge that the global community as a whole can come to the right decisions.  thank you to everyone who contributes their knowledge to these forums (and to those who contribute tasty info to Craig), and please remember to share your varied expertise elsewhere as well as here!

Sincerely,

John

x1000

I didn't know it was coming, and I got a gigantic smile last night when I saw it.

dstppy

  • 1D Mark IV
  • ******
  • Posts: 928
    • View Profile
Re: a thank you letter to Canon Rumors
« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2012, 11:36:37 AM »
I didn't know it was coming, and I got a gigantic smile last night when I saw it.

I sure as heck didn't.  So many  sites did this today I *actually got work done*.

Dagnabbit!

:)
Canon Rumors is presently creating photographer shortages in Middle Earth (all the trolls emigrated here)

92101media

  • Guest
Re: a thank you letter to Canon Rumors
« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2012, 11:38:21 AM »
Well put, John.

For those who are wondering what SOPA is about, here is a brief summary:
 
 If passed, SOPA would:
 - stifle innovation
 - undermine cybersecurity
 - give the US government the right to unilaterally censor foreign websites (from US viewers)
 - give copyright holders the right to issue economic takedowns and bring lawsuits against website owners and operators, if those websites have features that make it possible to post infringing content (note: a feature as simple as allowing an open comment box could be sufficient to qualify a website for a copyright infringement lawsuit)
 - make it a felony offense to post a copyrighted song or video
 - still be ineffective at achieving its goal as it's easy to bypass using direct IP addresses instead of DNS
 
 So, all in all, it would be largely ineffective at achieving its goal, while adding a whole host of troubling implications.
 
 This article is a great read on some of the technical details of SOPA for those interested:
 
 http://mashable.com/2012/01/17/sopa-dangerous-opinion/

well_dunno

  • Canon 6D
  • *****
  • Posts: 356
    • View Profile
Re: a thank you letter to Canon Rumors
« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2012, 12:24:32 PM »
+1 John!  considering the potential consequences, it is very concerning...

dld542004

  • Guest
Re: a thank you letter to Canon Rumors
« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2012, 12:25:45 PM »
Who cares!

Sunnystate

  • Rebel SL1
  • ***
  • Posts: 96
    • View Profile
Re: a thank you letter to Canon Rumors
« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2012, 12:32:19 PM »
Dear All,

I wanted to thank Craig and the webmasters for posting the video that was up earlier and the link to anti-SOPA/PIPA petitions.  it's a bigger deal than a lot of people realize, and, if passed, will impact many more people than what most realize.  I understand it's a U.S. issue and that many of the users here are from around the world, but it's an issue that could just as easily find its way to Canada, the EU, or anywhere else in the world (for that matter, it's an issue that is already a major problem in Asia). 

I also understand that this isn't a political site, but I don't believe the SOPA/PIPA issue is a political one either; if anything, it is indicative of politicians in general not having sufficient technical understanding to properly address what are dicey real-world issues that require significant technical knowledge to properly understand the myriad consequences that several lines of legislation can have. 

I hope plenty of others from this site will go out in protest of this over-reaching and poorly written piece of top-down legislation.  I hope even more however, that we all realize that the world has become an incredibly complex and specialized place, and that it is through the continued sharing of knowledge that the global community as a whole can come to the right decisions.  thank you to everyone who contributes their knowledge to these forums (and to those who contribute tasty info to Craig), and please remember to share your varied expertise elsewhere as well as here!

Sincerely,

John

Amen!

canon rumors FORUM

Re: a thank you letter to Canon Rumors
« Reply #6 on: January 18, 2012, 12:32:19 PM »

bvukich

  • Spam Assassin
  • Administrator
  • 5D Mark III
  • *****
  • Posts: 733
    • View Profile
    • My (sparse) ZenFolio Site
Re: a thank you letter to Canon Rumors
« Reply #7 on: January 18, 2012, 12:34:56 PM »
Who cares!

Anyone that uses the internet should!

Sunnystate

  • Rebel SL1
  • ***
  • Posts: 96
    • View Profile
Re: a thank you letter to Canon Rumors
« Reply #8 on: January 18, 2012, 12:40:42 PM »
For everybody that are using Flickr, there is an option to block all your photographs for the day, or any chosen photographs of anybody else... Spend few minutes there and do the right thing...  :)
z.

cezargalang

  • Guest
Re: a thank you letter to Canon Rumors
« Reply #9 on: January 18, 2012, 01:09:54 PM »
Who cares!

Anyone that uses the internet should!

+1

It's a very important medium for ideas, mostly everything else too.  ;D

bvukich

  • Spam Assassin
  • Administrator
  • 5D Mark III
  • *****
  • Posts: 733
    • View Profile
    • My (sparse) ZenFolio Site
Re: a thank you letter to Canon Rumors
« Reply #10 on: January 18, 2012, 01:13:42 PM »
For everybody that are using Flickr, there is an option to block all your photographs for the day, or any chosen photographs of anybody else... Spend few minutes there and do the right thing...  :)
z.

I wish I had a Flickr account, just so I could block it out for the day :)

bvukich

  • Spam Assassin
  • Administrator
  • 5D Mark III
  • *****
  • Posts: 733
    • View Profile
    • My (sparse) ZenFolio Site
Re: a thank you letter to Canon Rumors
« Reply #11 on: January 18, 2012, 01:17:49 PM »
I didn't know it was coming, and I got a gigantic smile last night when I saw it.

I sure as heck didn't.  So many  sites did this today I *actually got work done*.

Dagnabbit!

:)

I knew about the blackout as a whole, but I was pleasantly surprised to find CR participating.

sanyasi

  • Guest
Re: a thank you letter to Canon Rumors
« Reply #12 on: January 18, 2012, 01:25:39 PM »
Much of what is written about SOPA speaks in platitudes about free speech and an open Internet.  We all face a serious problem, particularly people who create content for a living. 

This problem has recently been well documented by Robert Levine in his book Free Ride: How Digital Parasites are Destroying the Culture Business.  The title is provocative, but Levine systematically documents how piracy has  damaged the music, movie, television, newspaper, and now the book businesses.  In my  own research, I have come across stories from countless photographers about how their works have been pirated.

Levine looks at cost structures, employment trends, and usage to make his case.  He shows how both the transmission and hardware companies have used piracy to build their businesses, knowing that much of what they are transmitting and putting in the hands of information consumers is pirated.  They then use the leverage they have obtained by gathering eyeballs to negotiate what have often proved to be unfavorable arrangements with content providers.

Levine also documents how the transmission and hardware companies have funded nonprofit organizations to promote the notion that information should be free and the Internet open.  These companies have manufactured populace sentiment to further their own profit-making agendas.  They have a right to do that, but there is another side to the story--the rights of creative people to earn a living.

If Levine's predictions are correct, we are on the cusp of learning what "Information Must Be Free" leads to:  Less quality information.  In one of many examples, Levine points to Spain as providing creative people with the fewest protections.  He demonstrates the devastating impact that a failure to regulate the Internet has had on the Spanish music industry.  Just yesterday, world--renowed Spanish author Lucia Etxebarria announced that she would cease writing novels because illegal downloading of e-books made it impossible for her to earn a living. 

Creative people have a right to be paid fairly for and control the distribution of their work. That is true regardless of whether the creative person is a lone photographer or a large media company.  The Internet is now well-established.  It is time to end the lawlessness and strike an appropriate balance between free speech and property rights.

As much as I would like all my music, books, newspapers, and movies to be free, I am willing to pay the creators for their work.  I am unwilling to hide behind free speech platitudes to serve my own selfish interests.

I continue to be puzzled why many creative people and people who like the fruits of creative people are so quick to  lobby on behalf of large corporations at the expense of creative people and their efforts.

canon rumors FORUM

Re: a thank you letter to Canon Rumors
« Reply #12 on: January 18, 2012, 01:25:39 PM »

bvukich

  • Spam Assassin
  • Administrator
  • 5D Mark III
  • *****
  • Posts: 733
    • View Profile
    • My (sparse) ZenFolio Site
Re: a thank you letter to Canon Rumors
« Reply #13 on: January 18, 2012, 01:49:18 PM »
Much of what is written about SOPA speaks in platitudes about free speech and an open Internet.  We all face a serious problem, particularly people who create content for a living. 

This problem has recently been well documented by Robert Levine in his book Free Ride: How Digital Parasites are Destroying the Culture Business.  The title is provocative, but Levine systematically documents how piracy has  damaged the music, movie, television, newspaper, and now the book businesses.  In my  own research, I have come across stories from countless photographers about how their works have been pirated.

Levine looks at cost structures, employment trends, and usage to make his case.  He shows how both the transmission and hardware companies have used piracy to build their businesses, knowing that much of what they are transmitting and putting in the hands of information consumers is pirated.  They then use the leverage they have obtained by gathering eyeballs to negotiate what have often proved to be unfavorable arrangements with content providers.

Levine also documents how the transmission and hardware companies have funded nonprofit organizations to promote the notion that information should be free and the Internet open.  These companies have manufactured populace sentiment to further their own profit-making agendas.  They have a right to do that, but there is another side to the story--the rights of creative people to earn a living.

If Levine's predictions are correct, we are on the cusp of learning what "Information Must Be Free" leads to:  Less quality information.  In one of many examples, Levine points to Spain as providing creative people with the fewest protections.  He demonstrates the devastating impact that a failure to regulate the Internet has had on the Spanish music industry.  Just yesterday, world--renowed Spanish author Lucia Etxebarria announced that she would cease writing novels because illegal downloading of e-books made it impossible for her to earn a living. 

Creative people have a right to be paid fairly for and control the distribution of their work. That is true regardless of whether the creative person is a lone photographer or a large media company.  The Internet is now well-established.  It is time to end the lawlessness and strike an appropriate balance between free speech and property rights.

As much as I would like all my music, books, newspapers, and movies to be free, I am willing to pay the creators for their work.  I am unwilling to hide behind free speech platitudes to serve my own selfish interests.

I continue to be puzzled why many creative people and people who like the fruits of creative people are so quick to  lobby on behalf of large corporations at the expense of creative people and their efforts.

There is nothing wrong with wanting to get compensated for your hard work.  I believe in it strongly, but...

Perpetual copyright, ensuring no content will ever enter the public domain; is wrong.

Suing your customers into oblivion (and financial ruin), using laws meant to go after commercial offenders; is wrong.

Making civil offences, like copyright infringement, criminal; is wrong.

Hamfisted censoring of the internet, based on the (often) tenuous claims of media conglomerates; is wrong.

well_dunno

  • Canon 6D
  • *****
  • Posts: 356
    • View Profile
Re: a thank you letter to Canon Rumors
« Reply #14 on: January 18, 2012, 01:57:16 PM »
Much of what is written about SOPA speaks in platitudes about free speech and an open Internet.  We all face a serious problem, particularly people who create content for a living. 

This problem has recently been well documented by Robert Levine in his book Free Ride: How Digital Parasites are Destroying the Culture Business.  The title is provocative, but Levine systematically documents how piracy has  damaged the music, movie, television, newspaper, and now the book businesses.  In my  own research, I have come across stories from countless photographers about how their works have been pirated.

Levine looks at cost structures, employment trends, and usage to make his case.  He shows how both the transmission and hardware companies have used piracy to build their businesses, knowing that much of what they are transmitting and putting in the hands of information consumers is pirated.  They then use the leverage they have obtained by gathering eyeballs to negotiate what have often proved to be unfavorable arrangements with content providers.

Levine also documents how the transmission and hardware companies have funded nonprofit organizations to promote the notion that information should be free and the Internet open.  These companies have manufactured populace sentiment to further their own profit-making agendas.  They have a right to do that, but there is another side to the story--the rights of creative people to earn a living.

If Levine's predictions are correct, we are on the cusp of learning what "Information Must Be Free" leads to:  Less quality information.  In one of many examples, Levine points to Spain as providing creative people with the fewest protections.  He demonstrates the devastating impact that a failure to regulate the Internet has had on the Spanish music industry.  Just yesterday, world--renowed Spanish author Lucia Etxebarria announced that she would cease writing novels because illegal downloading of e-books made it impossible for her to earn a living. 

Creative people have a right to be paid fairly for and control the distribution of their work. That is true regardless of whether the creative person is a lone photographer or a large media company.  The Internet is now well-established.  It is time to end the lawlessness and strike an appropriate balance between free speech and property rights.

As much as I would like all my music, books, newspapers, and movies to be free, I am willing to pay the creators for their work.  I am unwilling to hide behind free speech platitudes to serve my own selfish interests.

I continue to be puzzled why many creative people and people who like the fruits of creative people are so quick to  lobby on behalf of large corporations at the expense of creative people and their efforts.

There is nothing wrong with wanting to get compensated for your hard work.  I believe in it strongly, but...

Perpetual copyright, ensuring no content will ever enter the public domain; is wrong.

Suing your customers into oblivion (and financial ruin), using laws meant to go after commercial offenders; is wrong.

Making civil offences, like copyright infringement, criminal; is wrong.

Hamfisted censoring of the internet, based on the (often) tenuous claims of media conglomerates; is wrong.

+1
Opposing SOPA and PIPA does not mean supporting piracy.  The way the bills currently are, their range seems "a little" overdone considering the purpose :)

« Last Edit: January 18, 2012, 02:06:46 PM by well_dunno »

canon rumors FORUM

Re: a thank you letter to Canon Rumors
« Reply #14 on: January 18, 2012, 01:57:16 PM »