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Author Topic: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks  (Read 25580 times)

arthurbikemad

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #30 on: October 14, 2016, 04:33:03 PM »
Oh gutted!  I have a small para cord that teathers the camera to the lens, tripod, wrist, anything else I can safely setup a secondary fail safe, well on my 5D3 I do as not bothered to make one up for the 1D yet, maybe I will tomorrow now you say that!  Before I found I often pressed the lense release button while climbing around in brush etc and unclipped the body from the lens risking just what happened to you.

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #30 on: October 14, 2016, 04:33:03 PM »

Jack Douglas

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #31 on: October 14, 2016, 05:42:51 PM »
Just shot a Pileated WP and am taking a look at the images.  They seem noisier than my 6D images at ISO 1250, which shouldn't be, right?  The pose tells me that there is no front focus but there may be back focus so I must AFMA ASAP.

Here is a file number - can I change this to just a sequential, I'm guessing it's shot 50.  What's a good choice.  I like to keep the sequence # on every shot whenever I rename them as file stored jpgs.

AB2I0050

Jack
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Jack Douglas

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #32 on: October 14, 2016, 05:49:13 PM »
BTW I now have the set button configured for photoplayback which gives me right hand ability to review a shot when holding the big white so there is a conflict for me with EC usage.

Why is M with auto ISO so desirable other than be an auto exposure mode?  I guess this question would digress into the merits of manual vs. auto??

Eldar, that sure is a bummer.  So it seems like that click that ensures the pair stay together somehow didn't happen??

Jack
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privatebydesign

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #33 on: October 14, 2016, 06:10:19 PM »
Why is M with auto ISO so desirable other than be an auto exposure mode?  I guess this question would digress into the merits of manual vs. auto??

There are many shooting situations where M with Auto ISO work well with the need for EC, indeed it is strange it has taken so long to catch on.

Think of this scenario, you are using 400 f4 to shoot a bird, you know you need f8 to get the entire bird sharp because of dof, you know you need a 1/640 sec to get exactly the wing blur you want and you know you need plus 2/3 stop EC because the bird is lighter than mid tone, ergo the only other variable to allow for illumination levels is ISO.

My comment is not on the need for EC in M mode with Auto ISO and I'd hate to think I upset Eldar, it is one of nomenclature. Traditionally M has meant you dictate exposure, if you introduce an auto element to those exposures then it isn't manual mode.

The main reason I have taken issue with this is because, as I said earlier, I teach and people honestly believing they are in manual and dictating things when all they are doing is riding auto iso and getting excessively noisy images when they don't need to. Also their manual exposures always end up being mid toned when that is nothing close to what they actually set their cameras to get!
Too often we lose sight of the fact that photography is about capturing light, if we have the ability to take control of that light then we grow exponentially as photographers. More often than not the image is not about lens speed, sensor size, DR, MP's or AF, it is about the light.

Jack Douglas

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #34 on: October 14, 2016, 08:47:00 PM »
Scott,  I understand this:

Think of this scenario, you are using 400 f4 to shoot a bird, you know you need f8 to get the entire bird sharp because of dof, you know you need a 1/640 sec to get exactly the wing blur you want and you know you need plus 2/3 stop EC because the bird is lighter than mid tone, ergo the only other variable to allow for illumination levels is ISO.

The question is why not manually set the ISO for the needed exposure level that goes with the blur and DOF requirements and that's it or doesn't the ISO affect exposure in the way that I'm thinking?

Jack
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privatebydesign

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #35 on: October 14, 2016, 08:55:25 PM »
Scott,  I understand this:

Think of this scenario, you are using 400 f4 to shoot a bird, you know you need f8 to get the entire bird sharp because of dof, you know you need a 1/640 sec to get exactly the wing blur you want and you know you need plus 2/3 stop EC because the bird is lighter than mid tone, ergo the only other variable to allow for illumination levels is ISO.

The question is why not manually set the ISO for the needed exposure level that goes with the blur and DOF requirements and that's it or doesn't the ISO affect exposure in the way that I'm thinking?

Jack

That is the only variable bit that you don't have an artistic need to control, so if your bird flight path goes across different backgrounds or it comes from under canopy cover into an open better illuminated area the auto part makes a lot of sense. The camera can get the exposure 'right' much faster than we can. M mode traditionally only worked well in relatively constant subject illumination.

Of course we lived without auto iso for over 100 years, but new features push new images and there is no doubt that making stand out images is more difficult than ever. I have Nat Geo's going back over fifty years, the standard of photography has changed dramatically and there is no doubt that many of the stand out images are better technically than ever before. Same with the Olympics, or even look at modern wedding images from some of the real masters.
« Last Edit: October 14, 2016, 09:01:52 PM by privatebydesign »
Too often we lose sight of the fact that photography is about capturing light, if we have the ability to take control of that light then we grow exponentially as photographers. More often than not the image is not about lens speed, sensor size, DR, MP's or AF, it is about the light.

arbitrage

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #36 on: October 14, 2016, 10:02:57 PM »
A couple things I will contribute for now...I will try to add more later as I think of more tips...

1) You can set both the AF-On button and the * button to be focus buttons.  However, most don't realize there are two totally different ways that these can be customized.  Each way has different options for selection.

The first way is to set the button to Metering+AF start and then hit the INFO button and select the focusing mode, AF points etc....I think there are 4 options you can adjust doing it this way. 

The second way is to not assign Metering + AF start but instead use the "Register/recall shooting func"  Then hit INFO and you get a whole bunch of options you can assign to that button.  If you want it to AF make sure to tick that off at the bottom of the list.  This way allows changes to almost everything including aperture, ISO, SS settings and AF settings etc.

2) If you so desire you can set the main camera focus setting to One Shot but keep the two back buttons on AI Servo.  In this case you leave the shutter button active.  If you are holding the back button the camera will stay in AI Servo and hitting the shutter doesn't trigger the One Shot.  If you release the back button the shutter works as One Shot.  If you do it this way you loose the ability to focus recompose with the back button as some people like to do but you can still focus recompose with half press of the shutter button.

3) The #1 best thing I've ever found in the 1 series and it doesn't work in any of the other cameras is the ability to set the M-Fn button (up by the shutter button) to cycle through the C modes (and AV, TV, M).  This is the setting marked by a "C" when setting up the M-Fn in Custom Controls menu.  Personally I use M mode 100% of the time (and no Auto-ISO).  The M-Fn button will just cycle through M mode and the C1 (and C2 or C3 if you want).  I use this to have two different SS/Aperuture/ISO settings ready to go with a simple press of the M-Fn.  I usually use this to have a "perched" setting (lower ISO, lower SS) and a "flight" setting (higher ISO faster SS).  I find this amazingly effective to change between modes when flight opportunities arise.  I've also used this to have a sunny and shade modes when I have subjects in both lights or the sun is going in and out behind clouds.

If you decide to use the C modes I recommend setting them to Auto Update Set (Enable) so you can change them and the settings stick as needed.

You can do a similar thing with the "Register/recall shooting function" but then you have to dig into the menu every time the light changes and you want different SS/ISO/Av.

4)  Using the Set button to select ISO is my preferred way to do it.  However, if you like to use EC in M with Auto-ISO that uses the Set button to do it without using the menus so ISO has to be done another way.

5)AF joystick should be set to move focus points.  Remember you can push in the joystick to switch back to the centre point at any time (or you can change this behaviour to select the saved focus point instead (hit INFO while changing the joystick setting in Custom Controls) 
To change AF modes, pushing the upper right most back button and then using the top wheel works the best for me.

6)In C.Fn2:Exposure menu I select Same expo. for new aperture as "ISO".  This means when I slap on a TC the camera automatically changes my ISO to match my previously set exposure.  Not critical but was introduced for the 200-400 and with that lens it is critical when you are slapping the TC in and out with the switch in under a second.  However, you have to leave the camera on(I do always anyways) when swapping TCs to have this work.

I'll think of some more things and post more later...
« Last Edit: October 14, 2016, 10:11:48 PM by arbitrage »
1DX2\5D4\1DX\600II\400DOII\200-400Lw1.4TC\100-400II\100L\16-35f/4\70-200f/2.8LISII\24-70f/4\D500\200-500

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #36 on: October 14, 2016, 10:02:57 PM »

Jack Douglas

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #37 on: October 14, 2016, 11:49:00 PM »
Thanks arbitrage, I'll delve into this later with the camera in my lap.  Guess it doesn't make sense to use the set button to review images, although being a 6D person that struck my fancy.

Jack
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Eldar

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #38 on: October 15, 2016, 02:11:32 AM »

Why is M with auto ISO so desirable other than be an auto exposure mode?  I guess this question would digress into the merits of manual vs. auto??

Eldar, that sure is a bummer.  So it seems like that click that ensures the pair stay together somehow didn't happen??

Jack
The M mode with auto ISO is very desirable, when you want to control both shutter speed and aperture, in shifting light conditions and are willing to fluctuate on ISO. If things are more stable, I often shoot in full manual, where I control EC with ISO adjustments. However, adjusting ISO and shifting AF points around takes time and attention, so I prefer to use auto ISO. I use Av mode occasionally, when I know I have enough light to get proper shutter speeds at a given ISO setting, but I never use Tv mode.

The locking mechanism on my 1DX-II does give the click, but it does not lock properly. If you don´t get the click, you cannot control the lens aperture, so that is easy to detect. Canon´s (CPS that is) initial reaction was that the drop damage is not covered by warranty, but I claimed that it was a faulty locking mechanism that caused the damage. I have been told that they will come back with an answer next week. I have confirmed with my insurance company though that if Canon refuse to take it as warranty, they will cover it under the insurance.
More equipment than skills, but everything is used :)
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Besisika

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #39 on: October 15, 2016, 04:38:53 AM »

The M mode with auto ISO is very desirable, when you want to control both shutter speed and aperture, in shifting light conditions and are willing to fluctuate on ISO. If things are more stable, I often shoot in full manual, where I control EC with ISO adjustments. However, adjusting ISO and shifting AF points around takes time and attention, so I prefer to use auto ISO. I use Av mode occasionally, when I know I have enough light to get proper shutter speeds at a given ISO setting, but I never use Tv mode.

+1

arthurbikemad

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #40 on: October 15, 2016, 05:09:49 AM »
Another option you pay for and for those who use spot meter is to set "C.Fn1- Spot Meter. Linked to AF Point", you can also meter up to 8 (I think) areas to average the scene using AE lock/hold and the Fn button.

Jack Douglas

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #41 on: October 15, 2016, 07:42:47 AM »

Why is M with auto ISO so desirable other than be an auto exposure mode?  I guess this question would digress into the merits of manual vs. auto??

Eldar, that sure is a bummer.  So it seems like that click that ensures the pair stay together somehow didn't happen??

Jack
The M mode with auto ISO is very desirable, when you want to control both shutter speed and aperture, in shifting light conditions and are willing to fluctuate on ISO. If things are more stable, I often shoot in full manual, where I control EC with ISO adjustments. However, adjusting ISO and shifting AF points around takes time and attention, so I prefer to use auto ISO. I use Av mode occasionally, when I know I have enough light to get proper shutter speeds at a given ISO setting, but I never use Tv mode.

The locking mechanism on my 1DX-II does give the click, but it does not lock properly. If you don´t get the click, you cannot control the lens aperture, so that is easy to detect. Canon´s (CPS that is) initial reaction was that the drop damage is not covered by warranty, but I claimed that it was a faulty locking mechanism that caused the damage. I have been told that they will come back with an answer next week. I have confirmed with my insurance company though that if Canon refuse to take it as warranty, they will cover it under the insurance.

Thanks for that.  So this mode is essentially combining Av and Tv.  Is it correct to say that EC just shifts or biases the ISO value that gets implemented, automatically.  In other words the actual ISO setting that you see once EC is used is what you would have selected manually for correct exposure?

On your lens mount issue.  I went to my camera and fiddled with the lens lock trying to not quite click it etc. and twist the lens off and it seems once it clicks it represents a significant retention mechanism.  In your case if I understand correctly it was or could have been that actual physical lock that malfunctioned.

I can image I could quickly become a pain in someones neck with my questions. ;)

Jack
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Jack Douglas

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #42 on: October 15, 2016, 07:54:16 AM »
Another option you pay for and for those who use spot meter is to set "C.Fn1- Spot Meter. Linked to AF Point", you can also meter up to 8 (I think) areas to average the scene using AE lock/hold and the Fn button.

Now this one did come up in another thread where it was being requested as a feature for the 5D4 and Scott (PBD) debated the value of it.  I couldn't completely see why it would have any/many negatives although it may in fact not be that useful - another case where my expertise is not up to snuff.

I had actually selected that thinking that I'd rather have the metering off my subject that is under the AF point than some rather unrelated central region.  Now I'm wondering how big the metering region would be.  Your opinion?? 

Since I would be aware that I was metering off that region, I should be able to use it essentially the same as I would use the center region to confirm the brightness associated with my chosen subject (typically a bird only partially filling the frame).  On the other hand if the central metering is doing something more sophisticated involving the whole viewfinder and averaging, then that's a different story.

Jack
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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #42 on: October 15, 2016, 07:54:16 AM »

Jack Douglas

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #43 on: October 15, 2016, 08:26:50 AM »
From this site:  https://bird-wildlifephotographyblog.com/2016/05/23/canon-1dx-mark-ii-af-settings-first-review-for-bird-wildlife-photography/  this comment.

"The Lens Aberration Correction settings is new! More specifically, having the Diffraction Correction on allows for a slight sharpening of the details and a mitigation of the low pass filter, which very slightly blurs the image by design in order to avoid pattern issues in the image. The elimination of the low pass filter is what gives the extra sharpness edge to the Canon EOS 5DS R. This a very well welcomed feature!!"

Is this the same as just turning it on in DPP?

Jack
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arthurbikemad

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #44 on: October 15, 2016, 09:49:49 AM »

I had actually selected that thinking that I'd rather have the metering off my subject that is under the AF point than some rather unrelated central region.  Now I'm wondering how big the metering region would be.  Your opinion?? 


The 1DX2's spot meter is rated at approx 1.5% same as 5D3, 1.3% on the 5D4 and 3.5% on the 6D, they only talk of the center point but I'd take a guess and say they are all the same amount when linked, maybe someone knows for sure, it's a great feature imo and if you don't use it then fair do, but I'd rather have the option, I love the fact you can meter separate parts of a scene.

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Re: 1DX Mark II - getting the most out of the camera, tips and tricks
« Reply #44 on: October 15, 2016, 09:49:49 AM »