June 24, 2018, 09:15:41 AM

Author Topic: Shutter speed rule when shooting handheld  (Read 10061 times)

mb66energy

  • EOS 5DS R
  • ******
  • Posts: 905
    • My Homepage
Re: Shutter speed rule when shooting handheld
« Reply #30 on: March 15, 2018, 02:30:45 AM »
I have underestimated breathing technique for a very long time. My best time to trigger the shutter during a breathing cycle is shortly before the end of exhalation. I think that muscles are relaxed at the maximum and motion during exhalation is at the minimum.
Most used tools: EOS 200D + EF-S 60mm + EF 100mm Macro + EF f/2.0 100  + 4.0 / 70-200 IS

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Shutter speed rule when shooting handheld
« Reply #30 on: March 15, 2018, 02:30:45 AM »

Talys

  • EOS-1D X Mark II
  • *******
  • Posts: 1655
  • Canon 6DII
Re: Shutter speed rule when shooting handheld
« Reply #31 on: March 15, 2018, 02:59:26 AM »
As I was getting used to my 6D2 with 24-105mm STM lens, I found that just setting everything on auto and not paying attention to the whether there was any light to speak of worked rather well. Sure, pixel peeping on an ISO 40,000 shot showed noise, but the IS seemed to allow handheld shots at relatively slow shutter speeds.

Obviously I am going to pay more attention on important shots, but pushing limits while just messing around has given me a start at knowing what I can get away with, and that is a lot more than I would have tried without doing the casual shooting.

Sure, but you can also set an acceptable-to-your-tastes ISO cap to your personal preferences with Auto ISO.  My 5D3 is set to cap at ISO 6400 but I'll push that at concerts, super dim rooms, if I see an Elk after dark on the South Rim of the GC, etc.

- A

The subject matter makes a huge difference to what the maximum ISO can be to give you a great shot, too.  light brown woody stuff looks great even when you crank up the ISO, whereas near-blacks really suffer, as do many colors, like shades of blue.

Also, every photo looks best at the nearest-to-100 ISO, all other factors being equal, meaning that if you could, you'd shoot every photo at ISO 100.

So what I like to do when I'm learning a lens is to bracket the shutter speed, taking them at, for example, starting at 1/2000 and dropping it down a notch all the way to 1/60 - 1/250 (depending on the lens) of the types of things I like to shoot (same subject), and see how it all turns out.

At some point, you just won't notice anymore, but that point can vary a lot between lenses.  Then, once I have a setting I think I like I go and take a whole bunch of shots of stuff.


canon rumors FORUM

Re: Shutter speed rule when shooting handheld
« Reply #31 on: March 15, 2018, 02:59:26 AM »