June 20, 2018, 04:04:41 AM

Author Topic: The First PowerShot G7 X Mark III Specification List We've Seen [CR1]  (Read 9592 times)

stevelee

  • EOS 7D Mark II
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The Canon software does work the same on the iPad as on the iPhone and when you try to transfer a RAW photo (even if you only shoot RAW rather than RAW+jpeg) it converts the RAW image to jpeg (or it extracts the smaller jpeg image that is stored within the RAW format).  It does not transfer a RAW file.  You can check that by checking the file format and size of image copied to the iPad.  Different software tools like Adobe Mobile Lightroom will also tell you what format an image is when you import them.

The only reason I would ever want to transfer a picture from the camera to the phone is to email it to friends or post. So it wouldn't have occurred to me to want the RAW file itself on the phone. All I knew was that I could shoot a RAW photo, send it to the phone, and then email it to people. I hadn't really thought about what point the conversion to JPEG took place in the process. Obviously I am wanting to send them something they can see rather than a file they will need some  software to edit so they can create their own version of my picture. That is why I thought you were telling me that I couldn't do something that I clearly remembered doing.

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juan

  • PowerShot SX60 HS
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The Canon software does work the same on the iPad as on the iPhone and when you try to transfer a RAW photo (even if you only shoot RAW rather than RAW+jpeg) it converts the RAW image to jpeg (or it extracts the smaller jpeg image that is stored within the RAW format).  It does not transfer a RAW file.  You can check that by checking the file format and size of image copied to the iPad.  Different software tools like Adobe Mobile Lightroom will also tell you what format an image is when you import them.

The only reason I would ever want to transfer a picture from the camera to the phone is to email it to friends or post. So it wouldn't have occurred to me to want the RAW file itself on the phone. All I knew was that I could shoot a RAW photo, send it to the phone, and then email it to people. I hadn't really thought about what point the conversion to JPEG took place in the process. Obviously I am wanting to send them something they can see rather than a file they will need some  software to edit so they can create their own version of my picture. That is why I thought you were telling me that I couldn't do something that I clearly remembered doing.

I too can't imagine wanting to send a RAW photo to someone.  But there are plenty of us who want to *edit* RAW photos on their phones.  LightRoom Mobile is great for this.  Shooting with the camera for a while, you get a feel for scenes (especially high contrast and low light) where the sensor/lens and a few quick tweaks in LRM will make the photo pop or simply be usable but would not if the same photo was in JPEG or a RAW from a phone.

I'll give you an example.  Recently, I was at a roof top bar with some visiting business partners.  It was a dark night and there was a great skyline.  We wanted to get a nice group shot with the skyline behind us.  Photos taken with phone cameras using flash either made us too bright or made the skyline too dark, without the flash, we were too dark.  With my camera, I was able to get a shot in RAW without using a flash that would be perfect with a few seconds of quick edits but I had no quick and convenient way to get a RAW to my phone.  The JPEG didn't have enough depth to work with. When I got home, I was right, the RAW shot turned out great.  But it was kind of a moot point.  Folks had shared their shots hours ago when we were there.

Assuming you are editing on a desktop/laptop too.  If the editing is just using the JPEGs on an iPad, shooting RAW may be overkill.  With that said, if you have a high contrast or other scenes that require a lot of dynamic range, try editing the RAW file - there is so much more detail to pull out of the over and underexposed areas.  Have gotten so many amazing shots tweaking RAW photos that wouldn't have been possible working with the JPEG.
« Last Edit: May 24, 2018, 12:16:18 PM by juan »

stevelee

  • EOS 7D Mark II
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  • Posts: 560
OK. I finally get what you were trying to do and why. For me the situation has just never come up. I have on occasion cropped JPEGs or made slight color corrections in either Photos or Mobile Lightroom before emailing pictures, but nothing needing the range of adjustments RAW files afford. If it doesn't already look good in the camera or on the iPad, I don't think about sending it out.

I don't have a laptop, other than an ancient iBook that I now use only in the rare instance that I need to send an actual fax. I stay too busy doing things to spend time on my travels editing photos. I went for almost 10 years when I wouldn't even take a camera with me when I traveled, since I was serious enough about photography in those days that I would spend more time taking pictures than seeing or doing those things that I went to see and do. When I started traveling with a camera again, I promised myself that I would quit if I got back like that again. Prague was the only real exception. The city is so photogenic, I let myself out of the promise temporarily. I still might take hundreds of pictures on some trips, and will even take part of a day and devote it to picture taking. But I make sure that photography doesn't so much get in the way of what I came for. And there is nothing wrong with a photo excursion. I hope to do one soon with my new 100-400mm II once I figure out where I want to go and find a day that is not too outrageously hot or raining. And after that I hope to rent a TS lens (maybe the 24mm) for a week's "staycation" of using that lens around this area.

Kit.

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Re: The First PowerShot G7 X Mark III Specification List We've Seen [CR1]
« Reply #33 on: June 01, 2018, 05:20:18 AM »
I'll give you an example.  Recently, I was at a roof top bar with some visiting business partners.  It was a dark night and there was a great skyline.  We wanted to get a nice group shot with the skyline behind us.  Photos taken with phone cameras using flash either made us too bright or made the skyline too dark, without the flash, we were too dark.  With my camera, I was able to get a shot in RAW without using a flash that would be perfect with a few seconds of quick edits but I had no quick and convenient way to get a RAW to my phone.  The JPEG didn't have enough depth to work with. When I got home, I was right, the RAW shot turned out great.  But it was kind of a moot point.  Folks had shared their shots hours ago when we were there.
G7 X has both slow sync mode and flash exposure compensation. Wasn't it enough to get the desired image straight from the sensor?

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Re: The First PowerShot G7 X Mark III Specification List We've Seen [CR1]
« Reply #33 on: June 01, 2018, 05:20:18 AM »