December 18, 2014, 08:29:55 AM

Author Topic: Good/Better/Best Macro for T3i  (Read 12029 times)

jebrady03

  • Canon 70D
  • ****
  • Posts: 265
    • View Profile
Re: Good/Better/Best Macro for T3i
« Reply #30 on: March 17, 2012, 10:13:16 AM »
I'm shooting with a 60D and the 60mm macro.  I mostly use my camera for pictures of my pets which are boa constrictors.  I mostly use this lens for close up and macro shots.

Boas aren't easy to get pictures of as they rarely sit still and when you get really close to them (like when using a macro lens), they tend to turn and dart the other way.  The 60mm lens is great for getting close to them, but not too close and it's really sharp with gorgeous bokeh (IMO).

Here are a few shots I've taken recently (first two are actually "macro" and the third is just a "close up").  BTW, I have a "thing" for their eyes...







Hope that helps!
jb

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Good/Better/Best Macro for T3i
« Reply #30 on: March 17, 2012, 10:13:16 AM »

jebrady03

  • Canon 70D
  • ****
  • Posts: 265
    • View Profile
Re: Good/Better/Best Macro for T3i
« Reply #31 on: March 19, 2012, 12:25:45 PM »
Any better?  It's a link to the full 18mp size...
http://www.deviantconstrictors.com/images/HighQuality/IMG_0674lg.JPG

Still handheld but I feel like it's sharper. 1/100 f5.6, right at 1:1 magnification

Here's the downsized version


I think that part of the inherent problems with macro photography is that at such close distances, the depth of field is close to paper thin.  Obviously, skill (which I admit to having very little of), focus stacking, etc., can all compensate.  But, it's tough...

kirispupis

  • Canon 70D
  • ****
  • Posts: 318
    • View Profile
Re: Good/Better/Best Macro for T3i
« Reply #32 on: March 19, 2012, 01:26:24 PM »
I wouldn't say these are bad shots.  You are evidently very good at getting close to these snakes and your first three shots show attempts at interesting compositions.  With some more practice and time spent analyzing reptile shots from professionals I think you can significantly improve.

I disagree that the top shots are taken with top gear.  Very good gear often makes it easier, but many of the best shots I have seen used very low end gear.  That being said, you will not be disappointed with the 100/2.8 IS macro.

It is true that sharpness and optics-wise the IS and non-IS versions are almost identical.  However the IS, IMHO, completely sets this lens apart.  It allows you to shoot at shutter speeds otherwise unthinkable in macro.

In terms of your last shot, this is just my opinion but I offer the following critique.

The #1 issue I see with many beginner's photographs is they attempt to put too much in the shot.  This is an issue with this shot.  The green tuft (moss?) is distracting.  I am also unsure whether this is a portrait of the snake's head or just the eye.  The nostril seems to indicate this is a shot of the head, but then it is missing another nostril.  Keep things simple.  Decide what you want your subject to be and remove everything else.

Your DOF also confuses slightly.  I would like to see a touch more DOF - such as F8.

I believe you are following most of the proper technique already - handheld, no flash, and no AF.
5D3|TS-E 24 II|TS-E 17|TS-E 90|200-400/1.4x|MP-E 65|100/2.8 IS Macro|70-200/2.8 IS II||16-35/2.8 II|EOS M

Marsu42

  • Canon EF 400mm f/2.8L IS II
  • *********
  • Posts: 5358
  • ... on superhero vacation!
    • View Profile
    • 6D positive spec list
Re: Good/Better/Best Macro for T3i
« Reply #33 on: March 19, 2012, 01:41:02 PM »
It is true that sharpness and optics-wise the IS and non-IS versions are almost identical.  However the IS, IMHO, completely sets this lens apart.  It allows you to shoot at shutter speeds otherwise unthinkable in macro.

While this is often debated, I'm confident to say: no, it does not! The effect of the IS decreases when the magnification increases, until it is almost negligible at 1:1. You cannot expect to get 4 stops of improvement with macro and IS.

The reason to get the 100L is a) better dust/sand resistance due to weather sealing, b) dual-use as a portrait lens, c) hybrid IS at non-macro distances which can eliminate some shake when coupled with a good (i.e. 7D) servo af.

If one often shoots with a tripod (this is very often the case w/ macro, and of course focus stacking) or at real close macro distances, I'd advice for anyone on a budget to get a much cheaper non-L version and put the remaining money in another good lens - other L primes are sharper than the macros esp. at open aperture.

canon rumors FORUM

Re: Good/Better/Best Macro for T3i
« Reply #33 on: March 19, 2012, 01:41:02 PM »