November 27, 2014, 05:02:23 AM

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - friedmud

Pages: 1 ... 10 11 [12] 13 14 15
166
Lenses / Re: How do you correct chromatic aberrations?
« on: December 22, 2011, 04:33:04 PM »
I hate to be "that guy", but I did just want to mention that the CA correction in Lightroom 3 has been flawless for me.  I just enable "Lens Corrections" and magically CA and vignetting goes away (LR3 know about most every lens).

Just throwing that out there in case someone is reading this and trying to decide between tools.

167
EOS Bodies / Re: What Are Your Custom Modes Set To?
« on: December 22, 2011, 04:07:29 PM »

Don’t have my camera in front of me but they go something like this.

C1- my everyday settings
AV
ISO 160
AF Point Manual selection
Frame rate to burst
RAW format
AWB

C2- My here take my camera and take some pictures setting, mainly for the wife and friends that don’t have the knowledge to set ISO aperture exposure.

Almost everything is set to AUTO
Frame rate is set to single shot, hated getting 15 pictures of the same thing…
RAW format
Autofocus bracket things…

C3- Camera B&W setting (This will probably change soon since it can all be done in LR with a RAW image anyway)

AV
ISO 160
Frame rate single shot
JPEG+RAW, get a B&W image on the screen plus a color RAW copy
AF Point Manual selection

Interesting idea there on a "dummy" mode.  Do you find that it is easier for people to use than say "P" mode or full auto?

Interesting again on the B&W idea.  I too set my camera to shoot B&W when I'm out specifically for that purpose (so that the review photo is B&W and I can see how I'm doing).  I just shoot RAW though... and when LR3 first imports them they are color of course... then I have the choice to turn them back to B&W or not.  I don't mess with JPG for B&W (RAW files are great for B&W because you can push and pull on them so much more to get a dramatic look to the photo).

168
EOS Bodies / Re: What do you do with old bodies?
« on: December 22, 2011, 04:01:53 PM »
Had my XSi fail on me (shutter stuck) while on a recent photography trip to Oregon (and only 2 days in on a 5 day trip!).  After using my iPhone 4S to shoot with for the rest of the trip I vowed I would never again go without a backup camera!

I sent the XSi in to get it fixed, bought a 7D in the meantime and have now received my XSi back.

I'm currently on a trip and brought both bodies with me.  Haven't taken the XSi out yet... and don't really plan to.  But I know it's there if I need it!

Also, I have done weddings for friends in the past... and one time was able to borrow another XSi so I had two... and _wow_ did that help!  I put a long lens on one and my 17-55 f/2.8 with a flash on the other... it was great to be able to quickly switch back and forth during the ceremony.  The 7D will be even better in that regard...

169
EOS Bodies / Re: What Are Your Custom Modes Set To?
« on: December 22, 2011, 12:14:35 PM »
Just added another option to my C3 mode:  Safety Shift CFn I-6

If this is really going to be my Holy Crap! Mode then a safety shift makes sense to make sure that I capture "something". Since I have the ISO on auto, I don't think it will shift until it hits ISO 3200... which is fine by me (I wish I could limit it at ISO 800 though... Sigh)

I just tried it out in a dark room and it seems to work as promised (Adjusting my shutter speed even though I'm in Tv mode because the exposure would be terrible)

170
EOS Bodies / Re: What Are Your Custom Modes Set To?
« on: December 22, 2011, 11:46:27 AM »
(I do have the original mode dial without the center lock button which can only help.)

My custom settings are very close  to yours

C1 - Landscape, AV, 2/3 exposure bracketing but without the 2 sec delay and mirror lockup (is this really necessary when on a tripod?)
C2 - Portrait AV, also orientation AF enabled--currently mine is on zone; top zone for each orientation
C3 - Action TV, but with Full RAW.  Might have to try the AI Servo Tracking Sensitivity: +1, that makes sense

Wish the 7D had two more C positions

To take it a step further, I'd also like to know what menu items others have added to their custom menu.  I'll post mine later (on the road at the moment).

I wonder how many people have actually had their 7D or 5D2 modified with the locking dial.  I've never had a problem with it myself.  Anyone out there have the mod and think it really helps them?

I think it's interesting that several of us have exteemely similar custom modes.  Both yourself and qless use some exposure bracketing in C1.  I might just have to try that myself.

Mirror lockup and 2 second delay is definitely necessary on a tripod (even during the day!) for maximum sharpness.  The 7D actually makes it even more important, as the pixel pitch gets smaller the susceptibility to camera shake goes up.

Good idea about zone focus.  My only issue is that when I'm shooting portraits with a eide open aperture I like to focus directly on an eyeball... sometimes zone focus will pickup glasses / noses instead and then the eyes will be slightly out of focus.  On the other hand zone focus would allow you to catch those tricky candid shots more often.... Hmmmm....

I picked up the servo tracking sensitivity tip from a 7D review where the guy was shooting a lot of indoor soccer and found that he had the bes luck with +1.  I've only shot a bit with servo mode so far so for now I'm just going on blind faith.  :-)

One other thing I want to point out (and maybe have some discussion on) is "continuous AF track priority".  I find this optionto be really awesome but I would like to hear from others whether or not it has helped / hurt them in the field.  Note that this is the reason I am NOT using spot focus in C3... Because as far as I can tell spot focus won't track...

171
EOS Bodies / Re: What Are Your Custom Modes Set To?
« on: December 21, 2011, 04:51:02 PM »
With some minor variations, my 7D is set like yours - C1 for tripod, C2 for still wildlife (spot metering but not the orientation-sensitive AF points), and C3 is for birds in flight (1/1600 s, auto ISO, and specific tracking options, but still RAW).  My 5DII has tripod settings as C1, C2 isn't really used, C3 (because it's quick to spin to the stop) for moving subjects (Tv, AI Servo, etc.), not that those are the 5DII's forté.

Generally, if I'm shooting in Av mode it will slow the ahutter speed down (and jack the ISO up) as if I didn't have the flash at all...

Sounds like you might have C.Fn I-7 left on default (Auto).  That one sets shutter speed in Av mode, and option 2 sets it fixed at the max sync (1/250 s).

Interesting.  I just went to check it out.  I might end up switching that option.  What are the downsides?  If I'm shooting in the middle of the day and have the high speed sync option on on the flash will this still restrict the shutter speed to 1/250?

I guess I just need to play with it some more.  Thanks for the tip!

172
EOS Bodies / Re: What Are Your Custom Modes Set To?
« on: December 21, 2011, 12:21:11 PM »
I've only got as far as using C1, almost identical settings to yours but for food and other tripod photography so manual and an aperture of f/4 which I normally use as a starting point. The main thing it helps avoid in my case is picking up the camera later to take a quick shot and getting the dreaded two second beeps while the moment was lost.

That C3 "holy crap" idea is awesome, I can see that coming into use :D.

No joke on the "dreaded two second delay"... The fact that that will never happen to me again makes me almost want to weep with joy.

usually all the same settings (Av f4) but a range of ISOs so i can quickly flick between them a decent shutter speed.   That is the only thing i'd wish for on a new 5d, the ability to set a minimum shutter speed on auto iso, as auto iso goes too slow for me..

Firstly, I completely agree on the minimum shutter speed deal. It is one of my big pet peeves with Canon cameras.  I believe that some Nikon cameras have had it for quite a while.

Along those same lines the way the camera meters with an external flash has always bothered me.  Anytime I'm using a flash in a dark area (like a birthday party, etc) I usually grab for Manual (M) mode to set the the shutter speed to something that can capture motion (like 1/200 or so) the aperture to wide open and generally ISO 400 or so (depending on how much background I want to pick up vs just the thing lit by the flash).  Now that every other option is fixed the camera only has to vary the flash intensity to get the exposure right.

I wish there were a mode that I could set it to that would do something similar automatically.  Generally, if I'm shooting in Av mode it will slow the ahutter speed down (and jack the ISO up) as if I didn't have the flash at all...

Finally, two people have now chimed in that they use their Custom modes just for changing ISO!  This seems like it might be a design flaw with Canon's camera layout!  Personally, I've aleady gotten very fast at mashing the ISO button and dialing in the ISO I want, even without taking my eye away from the camera... but is there some better way of setting ISO?

Maybe a dedicated toggle button?  Another dedicated dial?  Hmmm....

173
EOS Bodies / What Are Your Custom Modes Set To?
« on: December 21, 2011, 12:41:59 AM »
Having just stepped up to the 7D from a Rebel I'm absolutely loving the three custom modes.  It has led me to wonder what everyone sets them to.

Here are what mine are currently set to:

C1: Landscape
Mode: Av
Aperture: f/8
ISO: 100
Exposure: Evaluative
Drive Mode: Single
Shutter Release: 2 Second Delay
Mirror Lockup: On
Auto Lighting Optimizer: Off
Highlight Tone Priority: Disabled
Long Exposure NR: Off
Silent Shooting: Off
Output: Full RAW

C2: Portrait
Mode: Av
Aperture: f/2.8
ISO: Auto
AF: Landscape Spot (just above middle), Left Portrait (handle up) Spot just above middle, Right Portrait (handle down) full auto all points active
Exposure: Evaluative
Drive Mode: Single
Auto Lighting Optimizer: Off
Highlight Tone Priority: Disabled
Long Exposure NR: Off
Silent Shooting: Off
Output: Full RAW

C3: Wildlife Tracking
Mode: Tv
Shutter Speed: 1/800
ISO: Auto
AF Drive: Servo
AF Point: Manual Point Selection (NOT Spot!) (Middle Point)
AI Servo Track Method: Continuous AF Track Priority
AI Servo Tracking Sensitivity: +1
Exposure: Evaluative
Drive Mode: High Speed Multiple
Auto Lighting Optimizer: Off
Highlight Tone Priority: Disabled
Long Exposure NR: Off
Silent Shooting: Off
Output: Full JPEG

C3 is basically my "Holy Crap Look At That!" mode... like a moose running by, or a bald eagle snatching a fish out of the river, etc.  I like that it's all the way at the end of the dial because I can just "crank it over" and be able to capture something unfolding rapidly.  I chose to go with Full JPEG in that mode for longer burst capability and less space taken overall (because I'll end up with tons of photos from just a few moments of holding down the shutter release on a 7D).

So how about it... what is _your_ philosophy on how to use those custom modes?

174
EOS Bodies / Re: Earthshatteringly Disappointed With 7D
« on: December 20, 2011, 01:02:43 AM »
If I can just add my 5 cents worth. There is a place for both the 7D and the 5D (classic and 5DmkII). [How diplomatically started, right]   ;D

I've used full frame and APS-C.  For me, at this stage and my style of photography, the 7D suits me best. I really appreciate the AF improvements (over my 350D).  I'll acknowledge that the 5D's focus is above that of my 350D.

However I even still use my 350D - eg when I really need something light, and I will pack my 18-55mm kit lens, and still achieve great photos.

But for anything sports, moving, macro, etc- my 7D comes out first.  Also, I'm very happy with my 7D for landscapes at ISO100, or ISO200, and for low light photos, I do like the 7D's ability and handling.  With some careful post processing, I can get images I am thankful for.

Definitely for landscape a 5D or 5DmkII with the FF sensor is most suited for most of those general 'scenic' applications. Though - as I wrote in another post - unless someone's pixel peeping, often it's hard (or impossible) to tell from normal viewing distance if a certain photo was taken with FF or APS-C.

All the best to everyone!  :)

Paul

Good post Paul... and most definitely appreciated!  Good to hear from someone who has used a 7D for quite a few different purposes.

I am quickly realizing that the 7D was still my best bet at this moment (although I am thinking I could have held out a bit longer to see what comes down the pipe from Canon... but that's water under the bridge now).  After initially receiving underwhelming performance I went straight to the 'net and found scores of others claiming the 7D has all sorts of problems (as you can do for any piece of photographic equipment!) and quickly convinced myself I had made a mistake.

All of the quality posts pouring into this thread about the versatility of the 7D are making me realize that I fell into that old internet trap of listening to those who yell loudest (which are typically the ones with "problems").

Are there real issues?  Certainly.  If you have the cash to spend, are there better options for purely landscape photography?  Yes (I think that has been well established at this point).  Is it still a highly versatile camera with MANY excellent points: DEFINITELY.

This thread proves once again that the best pictures are the ones we actually take... and that any modern equipment can be used to produce exceptional and moving images when put in the right hands.  It is plainly obvious at this point that the 7D won't hold anyone with capability back.

I would like to thank all of the 7D owners who have chimed in with their helpful experiences in using this camera.  It has been thoroughly insightful!

175
EOS Bodies / Re: any flaws in the canon 60d?
« on: December 19, 2011, 06:45:57 PM »
Not sure about the 5DIII but 7D2 is very unlikely in Jan/Feb. Around Photokina would be a more realistic expectation ;)

Good point.  Just pointing out that new stuff is definitely expected in the coming year!

176
EOS Bodies / Re: any flaws in the canon 60d?
« on: December 19, 2011, 06:02:58 PM »
Having justgonethrough this myself (upgraded from a 450D)... and ended up with a 7D that I personally feel isn't incredible (see my "earthshattering" thread) but has a ton of awesome features... My advice is to:

WAIT!

If your current camera isn't broken... I would hang on to it for a little while longer.  The 7D2, 5DIII, or 650D will probably be announced in January / February... and then you will have more information to make a more informed decision.

If I could do it all over again I would have continued waiting....

177
EOS Bodies / Re: Earthshatteringly Disappointed With 7D
« on: December 19, 2011, 05:44:43 PM »
I was just out shooting a redtailed hawk that was in a tree nearby with my 7D.  Even with my dumb old 55-250 IS I was able to get some decent shots of the bird as it flew away.

I really like the "continuous AF track priority" option!  I had the middle AF point selected and after I locked on with it (which was admittedly slow due to the crappy lens) the AF points dutifully followed the bird around the frame as I "machinegunned" my way through a few seconds of flight.  Every single one of those shots was in focus.  Really impressive!

Drmikeinpdx: thanks for your comment!  It seems to mirror my general feelings about the 7D.  Unfortunately, I don't have the cash to step up to FF right now... so I'm going to continue to make peace with the 7D.

There are a ton of things to love about this camera... but there are definitely a couple of IQ issues...

178
EOS Bodies / Re: 3 types of pro bodies make sense
« on: December 18, 2011, 03:04:43 PM »
I think 3 types of pro bodies make sense. 1) high res, 2) high speed and 3) high DR

I think Nikon might be going that route first -- high rest D800, high DR D4, and may be high speed D4s in the future.

May be I am just hallucinating, but makes sense.

Make sense.  Do you think "high DR" should be "high DR / low noise"?

179
EOS Bodies / Re: Earthshatteringly Disappointed With 7D
« on: December 18, 2011, 02:50:07 PM »
@jrista

Firstly, I know you weren't responding to me directly, but that doesn't stop me from commenting on your posts...

Secondly, you still used the same arguments.

Let me try again.

Your argument basically boils down to: "Prints are generally 4x6 to 13x19 and if they are bigger then your viewers won't be critically close so don't worry about it."

This is a fine, rational explanation... however it doesn't add anything to the conversation.  You could make this argument about EVERYTHING on this site:

Post Title: "1DX rumored"
Your Response:  "Prints are generally 4x6 to 13x19 and if they are bigger then your viewers won't be critically close so don't worry about it."

Post Title: "Should I upgrade from a 450D to a 5DII?"
Your Response:  "Prints are generally 4x6 to 13x19 and if they are bigger then your viewers won't be critically close so don't worry about it."

Post Title: "Will the 5DIII have 54MP?"
Your Response:  "Prints are generally 4x6 to 13x19 and if they are bigger then your viewers won't be critically close so don't worry about it."

Post Title: "My 18-85 seems a bit soft"
Your Response:  "Prints are generally 4x6 to 13x19 and if they are bigger then your viewers won't be critically close so don't worry about it."

Post Title: "This new 70-200 seems to be off a bit on the focus"
Your Response:  "Prints are generally 4x6 to 13x19 and if they are bigger then your viewers won't be critically close so don't worry about it."

Past Post Title: "Should I upgrade from a 20D to a 40D?"
Your Response:  "Prints are generally 4x6 to 13x19 and if they are bigger then your viewers won't be critically close so don't worry about it."

Future Post Title: "Is an 80D better than a 70D?"
Your Response:  "Prints are generally 4x6 to 13x19 and if they are bigger then your viewers won't be critically close so don't worry about it."

Future Post Title: "120MP 5D9 Rumored!"
Your Response:  "Prints are generally 4x6 to 13x19 and if they are bigger then your viewers won't be critically close so don't worry about it."


Yes, you have a very well reasoned mathematical basis behind your posts: but so what!  It's not adding anything to the conversation about whether or not the 7D has quite a bit of low ISO noise.  In essence, your posts are just adding "noise" to the conversation!

Whatever our motivations are for being interested in low ISO noise on the 7D... just let us talk about it without slapping us in the face with your dogma on printing / viewing sizes.

I mean, seriously... it's like you want this banner at the top of Canonrumors whole website: "Prints are generally 4x6 to 13x19 and if they are bigger then your viewers won't be critically close so don't worry about it."

To me, Canonrumors is all about pointing out existing weaknesses in Canon's cameras and fantasizing about the future of these machines.  If we can't have a real conversation about things people are actually observing in their existing cameras, why do these forums even exist?



NOW - back on topic.  I shot a bunch of tree silhouettes last night with my 7D on ISO 100 and am very happy with the output.  Unfortunately, I only have a tiny loner Macbook Air with iPhoto on it right now so it is hard to get a sense of the noise in the photos... but after a bit of sharpening and a little bit of denoise in iPhoto I feel like I got some really nice shots.

The more I use this camera the more I'm enjoying my time with it.

(Please excuse the quality of the upload... iPhoto is fairly limited, I'll give these shots a proper workup when I get back home)

180
EOS Bodies / Re: Earthshatteringly Disappointed With 7D
« on: December 18, 2011, 02:09:28 AM »
You would have to blow up a print at least three fold for it to be large enough for noise to exhibit like it might at 100% on-screen. The simple fact of the matter is, the VAST MAJORITY of viewing contexts require downsizing, usually significant downsizing or increases to resolution density, relative to a 100% crop view on a computer screen. The only time you are actually enlarging any viewing context beyond that scope is with prints larger than 52"x35" (for the 7D anyway), at which point image pixels in print are about the same size as on a screen. Most of the time, enlargements of such scale are done very carefully, with meticulous care around noise and sharpness, so noise is rarely as visible on screen as it is in such a large print.

The only time the levels of noise we have today in current-generation cameras (7D, 60D, 600D, even 5D II) exhibit as a problem is when viewed at 100% crop on a computer. Outside of those who tend to obsess over quality at 100% crop, viewing any photo in that way is impractical and unrealistic. @KeithR's sample photos, while they do appear to be downsized a bit, also demonstrate a REALISTIC viewing context, and thats where any photo's IS should be evaluated...in realistic context.

I know that you believe what you are saying and trying to be helpful, but I still think that you don't understand the crux of the problem.  Let me see if I can break it down for you.

1. I can see the noise from an ISO 100 shot on my 7D when looking at the entire photo on my 27" screen.  That is... NOT a 100% crop.  Quit saying that noise is only an issue at 100%.

2.  Next you will say "calibrate your monitor!".  That has nothing to do with it... as my XSi shots look fine when viewing the whole image on the screen.

2.5 (Ninja Edit) Extreme resolution monitors are on the horizon (most likely this year). There are already talks of a 2880x1800 Macbook Pro... and an iMac could come out with 5120x2800!  At those resolutions npise is going to start to be easily visible in a lot of photos!

3.  Cropping:  one of the main reasons to move up to a higher MP is so you can crop a bit closer.  If your image has a ton of noise in it that negates a lot of your ability to crop.

4.  Different people have different purposes for their photography.  If you are doing portraits, you might leave the final picture a bit soft so as to downplay facial blemishes.  However, if you are shooting landscapes you want to bring out every detail and that means "sharpening".  If there is a ton of noise hanging around it might not matter to the person doing portraits, however if you are trying to sharpen tiny details in your photo (that you bought an 18MP camera to capture) noise makes life extremely difficult.

5.  You keep claiming that all anyone does is look at tiny versions of your photos.  I will mostly agree with that (but add a caveat about cropping - and how that effectively means that even viewers of your prints are "zoomed in").  However, what if that didn't have to be the case??

Personally, I upload full resolution jpegs to Flickr.  If someone is so inclined, they can view it at full resolution and zoom in to see detail in my landscapes.  Now, I agree that most people probably don't do that... But just think about if you could capture perfectly noise free images: you could encourage people to explore the full res versions of your photos, giving a new, dynamic way to enjoy your photography.

--

I guess my problem with your philosophy on noise boils down to this: You, just like every other luddite throughout history continue to claim that "What we have is good enough!".  The problem is that you are WRONG and will be proven so as technology advances.  In 5 years we'll wonder about how we put up with these noisy machines as we look forward to advances on our 45MP mirrorless pieces of awesome that we use in ways you cannot even fathom right now and you will still be saying things like "Why do you need something better than 45MP!"...

I have been entirely too negative in this post so I will leave you all with a link to a set of photos of mine on Flickr.  These were taken with My XSi and have the full res versions of the images there... So feel free to view them that way!

http://www.flickr.com/photos/friedmud/sets/72157628014191618/

Pages: 1 ... 10 11 [12] 13 14 15