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Messages - dolina

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331
Lenses / Re: How do you deal with lens reviews...
« on: December 20, 2013, 03:49:23 AM »
^^

Are there any better alternatives to these ultra wide zooms? If there are then you should go for em.

I have both lenses and they're good enough for photojournalist who work for Reunters, AP, AFP, EPA and other orgs.

As for choosing either one it boils down to f-number, weight and price.

332
Animal Kingdom / Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« on: December 19, 2013, 05:01:28 PM »
Thanks Eldar and Click.


Buff-banded Rail (Gallirallus philippensis) by alabang, on Flickr

The Buff-banded Rail (Gallirallus philippensis) is a distinctively coloured, highly dispersive, medium-sized rail of the family Rallidae. This species comprises several subspecies found throughout much of Australasia and the south-west Pacific region, including the Philippines (where it is known as Tikling), New Guinea, Australia, New Zealand (where it is known as the Banded Rail or Moho-pereru in Māori),[2] and numerous smaller islands, covering a range of latitudes from the tropics to the Subantarctic.

It is a largely terrestrial bird the size of a small domestic chicken, with mainly brown upperparts, finely banded black and white underparts, a white eyebrow, chestnut band running from the bill round the nape, with a buff band on the breast. It utilises a range of moist or wetland habitats with low, dense vegetation for cover. It is usually quite shy but may become very tame and bold in some circumstances, such as in island resorts within the Great Barrier Reef region.[3]

The Buff-banded Rail is an omnivorous scavenger which feeds on a range of terrestrial invertebrates and small vertebrates, seeds, fallen fruit and other vegetable matter, as well as carrion and refuse. Its nest is usually situated in dense grassy or reedy vegetation close to water, with a clutch size of 3-4. Although some island populations may be threatened, or even exterminated, by introduced predators, the species as a whole appears to be safe and its conservation status is considered to be of Least Concern.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buff-banded_Rail

Taken: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Los_Ba%C3%B1os,_Laguna

Settings: 1/200 ƒ/8 ISO 100 800mm

333
Sports / Re: F1 Photography Advice
« on: December 19, 2013, 02:43:29 AM »
Try to get a photo pass.

If you cant get one then get a all area pass.

Try slow shutter panning.

Elevate yourself above eye level.

If you are doing Singapore the week of the race Canon normally sponsors a talk by a motorsport photog.

Formula 1 Photographer Interview Darren Heath
http://forums.vr-zone.com/chit-chatting/487949-darren-heath-f1-professional-photography.html
Darren Heath - What it means to me
https://archive.org/details/TheFlyingLapEpisode57F1PhotographerDarrenHeath
https://archive.org/details/TWiT_Photo_39

334
EOS Bodies / Re: Do you have a 4K display?
« on: December 18, 2013, 05:24:17 PM »
I have also encountered people who can't see the difference due to sheer ignorance. One time I tried to point out all the jaggies on screen to a friend of mine. His response was that he didn't know what they are so it didn't bother him.
Reminds me of ppl who are so used to mediocre food being fed good food.

Cannot relate.

335
EOS Bodies / Re: Do you have a 4K display?
« on: December 18, 2013, 10:33:25 AM »
Hopefully by the time the "slim" Xbox One and PS4 comes out quality 4K resolution UHDTV will sell for under $2000. Maybe by then these "slim" updates will come with an optical disk drive that accept 4K resolution content.

Other than resolution the other motivation for me to upgrade would be the weight and power consumption. Power consumption is pretty much self explanatory as $/watt is always increasing and never decreasing but weight? It has been my dream to mount a display on the ceiling above my head. If the display is almost as light as an acoustic board then it is possible to do.

My dentist wanted to do that with his HDTV in his office so his patients can watch TV while he mucks around in their mouth but the contractor forbade it. :(

336
EOS Bodies / Re: Do you have a 4K display?
« on: December 18, 2013, 10:22:01 AM »
I limit myself to 4K resolution as 8K resolution is not that commercially available.

Similar to expatinasia I told my friends who were getting married within the past 10 years to request the video ppl to store there 1080p video to HDD instead of down converting it to DVD.

If it was economical I'd go with 35mm film instead and scan it into 8K resolution later.

The typical upgrade cycle of consumers for TVs is 7-8 years. I have a 2006 32-inch 720p HDTV so that makes me a prime candidate to replace it. But it still works.

Cable TV in the Philippines started offering 720p since 2009 through today so I do not see a purpose in upgrading to 4K resolution at the moment. Do not worry I also have a much newer 40-inch and 46-inch 1080p HDTV so we arent totally backwards here. ;)
I remember someone once asked me a few years ago why I was recording all my videos in 1080, and I replied that technology was only going in one direction so while at that time broadband speeds were still quite slow, and 720 was more popular on the net, just a short time later and we are talking about 4K.

I agree with Dolina that if it were an important event like a wedding, I would, if possible like it to be recorded in 4K to future proof it as much as possible, but I think mainstream 4K will still take a while to catch up.

A lot has to do with the TV companies, some countries are faster than others to deliver full HD TV. I know that the Full HD TV channels I have look great on my big TV but the rest of the channels look bad.

I expect 31.5-inch 8K resolution displays selling for below $1000 in 1-2 decades time.

I could even see myself skipping 4K and going for whatever is after it.

2014 sub-$1000 4K resolution displays are most probably using lower-end panels and I did mention that I want a display larger than 31.5-inch,correct? At the current ppi of the 27-inch iMac a 4K resolution display would need to be 46-inch wide.

I'm after quality. If i wasn't then Amazon is selling a 50-inch Seiki 4K resolution UHDTV for less than $770.

http://www.macrumors.com/2013/12/02/24-inch-4k-display-from-dell-priced-at-1399-28-inch-4k-model-coming-at-under-1000/

337
EOS Bodies / Re: Do you have a 4K display?
« on: December 18, 2013, 04:44:55 AM »
If I were to get married today I would insist on my ceremony being recorded in 4K resolution.

I am currently using a 3K resolution (2560x1440p) display to type this post and I look forward to picking up a 4K resolution display when computer displays drop below $1000. Ideally it be 31.5-inch or wider. The Sharp PN-K321 today sells for $3,299.

As for 4K UHDTVs I see myself picking one up when there is downloadable content is available in 4K or there is data storage format that supersedes 2K resolution Blu-ray Disc.

Another possible condition of my getting a 4K UHDTV is when Sony & Microsoft releases their "slim model" of the PS4 & Xbox One in say 4-6 years.

I am one of the few guys who arent really interested in getting a video console this soon. During the last video console wars I waited until the first price cut to get one. Reason being the 1st year of a video console's life the games tend to be half baked.

338
Canon EF Prime Lenses / Re: Canon EF 800mm f/5.6L IS USM
« on: December 18, 2013, 04:22:32 AM »

Brown Shrike (Lanius cristatus) by alabang, on Flickr

The Brown Shrike is a migratory species and ringing studies show that they have a high fidelity to their wintering sites, often returning to the same locations each winter.[20][21][22] They begin establishing wintering territories shortly on arrival and their loud chattering or rattling calls are distinctive. Birds that arrive early and establish territories appear to have an advantage over those that arrive later in the winter areas.[23][24] The timing of their migration is very regular with their arrival in winter to India in August to September and departure in April.[25] During their winter period, they go through a premigratory moult.[20] Their song in the winter quarters is faint and somewhat resembles the call of the Rosy Starling and often includes mimicry of other birds. The beak remains closed when singing and only throat pulsations are visible although the bird moves its tail up and down while singing.[5][26]

The breeding season is late May or June and the breeding habitat includes the taiga, forest to semi-desert where they build a nest in a tree or bush, laying 2-6 eggs.[27]

They feed mainly on insects, especially lepidoptera.[28] Like other shrikes, they impale prey on thorns. Small birds and lizards are also sometimes preyed on.[29] A white-eye (Zosterops) has been recorded in its larder.[5] They typically look out for prey from a perch and fly down towards the ground to capture them.[30]

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_Shrike

Location: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muntinlupa

Settings: 1/400 ƒ/5.6 ISO 2500 800mm

339
Animal Kingdom / Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« on: December 18, 2013, 04:21:20 AM »

Brown Shrike (Lanius cristatus) by alabang, on Flickr

The Brown Shrike is a migratory species and ringing studies show that they have a high fidelity to their wintering sites, often returning to the same locations each winter.[20][21][22] They begin establishing wintering territories shortly on arrival and their loud chattering or rattling calls are distinctive. Birds that arrive early and establish territories appear to have an advantage over those that arrive later in the winter areas.[23][24] The timing of their migration is very regular with their arrival in winter to India in August to September and departure in April.[25] During their winter period, they go through a premigratory moult.[20] Their song in the winter quarters is faint and somewhat resembles the call of the Rosy Starling and often includes mimicry of other birds. The beak remains closed when singing and only throat pulsations are visible although the bird moves its tail up and down while singing.[5][26]

The breeding season is late May or June and the breeding habitat includes the taiga, forest to semi-desert where they build a nest in a tree or bush, laying 2-6 eggs.[27]

They feed mainly on insects, especially lepidoptera.[28] Like other shrikes, they impale prey on thorns. Small birds and lizards are also sometimes preyed on.[29] A white-eye (Zosterops) has been recorded in its larder.[5] They typically look out for prey from a perch and fly down towards the ground to capture them.[30]

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brown_Shrike

Location: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muntinlupa

Settings: 1/400 ƒ/5.6 ISO 2500 800mm

340
Animal Kingdom / Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« on: December 16, 2013, 12:04:48 AM »

Spotted Munia (Lonchura punctulata) by alabang, on Flickr

Being a highly sociable bird, the scaly-breasted munia is usually found in small groups, which sometimes include other species of the genus Lonchura. The diet of the scaly-breasted munia comprises mainly seeds, and this species spends much of its time foraging off the ground. It also takes seeds directly from plants such as rice during the harvest season, when the kernels are maturing (2).

Typically, Lonchura species build dome-shaped nests (7). Pairs of scaly-breasted munias will build nests from grass, straw and bamboo leaves. The nests can be found in bushes and usually contain four to seven eggs (2). Species within the Lonchura genus usually incubate their eggs for 15 to 18 days, and once hatched, the chicks grow rapidly and are fully independent within a few months (7).

Source: http://www.arkive.org/scaly-breasted-munia/lonchura-punctulata/

Location: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muntinlupa

Settings: 1/500 ƒ/9 ISO 1000 1200mm

341
Third Party Lenses (Sigma, Tamron, etc.) / Tamron SP 150-600mm Di VC USD
« on: December 14, 2013, 12:44:24 AM »
The Canon mount model will be released first in Japan on December 19, 2013 and subsequently elsewhere. The launch dates of the Nikon and Sony compatible mount models will be announced at a later date. The SP 150-600mm Di VC USD lens will be available in the USA on January 17, 2014.

Kindly share images using this lens here.

342
Animal Kingdom / Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« on: December 12, 2013, 10:00:50 PM »

Philippine Duck (Anas luzonica) by alabang, on Flickr

Philippine Duck (Anas luzonica) is endemic to the Philippines, being recorded from all the major islands and eight smaller islands. Records since 1980 derive from c.30 localities, most on Luzon and Mindanao. Records from Siquijor and the Sulus remain unsubstantiated. A steep population decline was evident by the mid-1970s, with high numbers recorded at only a few sites in the following decade, e.g. Candaba Marsh (Luzon) which probably supported many thousands in the early 1980s. Subsequent local extinctions and near-disappearances have occurred in several significant sites, including Candaba Marsh and Buguey wetlands (where several thousand were recorded in 1983). Important current areas include Polillo Island (240 seen and an estimated 3,000 present in 1996), Subic Bay (600 seen in 1997), Magat dam (2,000 were seen in 2001) and Malasi lakes (1,320 were recorded in 2002), Luzon. Other recent records come from Mangatarem, Pangasinan (east of Zambales Mountains IBA) where 70 individuals were counted on the Barabac River inside the Manleluag Spring National Park, Cantilan mangroves in Surigao del Sur and from a mangrove fishpond in Bicol Region, Southern Luzon1. In 1993, its population was estimated at 10,000-100,000, but by 2002 fewer than 10,000 birds were thought to remain.

Source: http://83.138.144.95/datazone/speciesfactsheet.php?id=439

Location: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Candaba,_Pampanga

Settings: 1/1250 ƒ/8 ISO 800 600mm

343
Canon EF Prime Lenses / Re: Canon EF 200mm f/2L IS USM
« on: December 12, 2013, 02:10:42 AM »

Zebra Dove Geopelia striata by alabang, on Flickr

The Zebra Dove Geopelia striata, also known as Barred Ground Dove, is a bird of the dove family Columbidae, native to South-east Asia. It is closely related to the Peaceful Dove of Australia and New Guinea and the Barred Dove of eastern Indonesia. These two were classified as subspecies of the Zebra Dove until recently and the names Peaceful Dove and Barred Dove were often applied to the whole species.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zebra_Dove

Location: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muntinlupa

Settings: 1/800 ƒ/2.0 ISO 320 200mm

344
Animal Kingdom / Re: Show your Bird Portraits
« on: December 12, 2013, 02:03:55 AM »

Zebra Dove Geopelia striata by alabang, on Flickr

The Zebra Dove Geopelia striata, also known as Barred Ground Dove, is a bird of the dove family Columbidae, native to South-east Asia. It is closely related to the Peaceful Dove of Australia and New Guinea and the Barred Dove of eastern Indonesia. These two were classified as subspecies of the Zebra Dove until recently and the names Peaceful Dove and Barred Dove were often applied to the whole species.

Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zebra_Dove

Location: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muntinlupa

Settings: 1/800 ƒ/2.0 ISO 320 200mm

345
Software & Accessories / Re: Any happy Marumi filters customers?
« on: December 11, 2013, 01:21:27 PM »
Marumi in the Filipino language of Tagalog means "dirty".  :o

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