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Messages - GMCPhotographics

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271
EOS Bodies / Re: Will Canon Answer the D4s? [CR2]
« on: January 10, 2014, 09:49:42 AM »
I wonder if the D800 sales might be pointing them in another direction...

I think the fact that Canon has not rushed a 36mp camera to market is further anecdotal evidence that the D800 series have not been an out and out winner for Nikon.

A high mp FF camera seems to fall into two very different camps. On the one hand you have a few serious photographers who really will be able to use that potential resolution in their work, and then on the other hand the casual user who gets most pleasure by drooling over the size of images at 100% on the computer screen. Pleasure may turn to disappointment when they find they have to use the finest glass, stop down a couple, mount on a rock solid tripod, crop out the edges of the frame etc, etc.

My guess is that when Canon do introduce their high mp offering it will be a very high end camera. Then when the consumer is educated enough to understand why a 18 mp 1Dx is five times more expensive than a 40mp 9D we might see a high mp 'budget' camera.

The great thing about the 5DIII and 1Dx is their image quality and frame rate. If we have a camera with a higher MP count, then the frame rate will drop. The current throughput for Dual Digic 5 is 225mb/s. This gives us a throughput which can be cut several ways, 12fps @ 18.1mp = 217mb/s. If we assume the same Dual Digic 5 chip set, 225mp / 5 fps 45 mp. If you want the higher MP chip then there's only one way the fps can go.
If the Canon develops Digic 6, generally a gain of 1.5x according to past upgrades, we get a potential figures of 340 mb/s, 12fps @ 28mp (nice) or 5fps @ 67.5 mp or 7.5fps @ 45mp.

272
EOS Bodies / Re: Will Canon Answer the D4s? [CR2]
« on: January 10, 2014, 05:38:00 AM »
Canon doesn't have to answer the D4s. It needs to answer the D800(e).

No, they really don't. The 5DIII was the answer, and it has outsold the D800 and far outsold the D800E.

I still think it's possible we'll see a high MP sensor from Canon in the future, not as an 'answer' but rather to capture a part of the market they feel may be untapped.  But we'll only see that if Canon feels there's enough of a market for it.  I wonder if the D800 sales might be pointing them in another direction...

This is a sensible, yet very stupid, way to look at it. Fans of music artists also waste time on caring about the sales of their own favorite artists. In the end though, all that should be irrelevant to the fans. It doesn't matter if plenty of others bump the same music. Bad sales might actually force something better out the next time.

Canon's sales don't really matter to me. Or actually... Had the 5D3 flopped, Canon would most likely work hard to make improvements and maybe they'd even unlock some of the features that have been artificially hidden to justify the 1DX price tag.

From a sales point of view you can say that they don't have to do S___ now, but instead of viewing the whole situation as a competition agains Nikon, there are other aspects. Besides, they need to beat the crap out of the 5D3 with the upcoming replacement to get money from the 5D3 purchasers again.

The bottom line is though that I don't care how well Canon does on the markets. Nikon can outsell Canon and I just don't care. For me the thing that matters here is the equipment I can afford to use. Surely it's heavily linked to the markets, but that's none of my business.

The 5DIII is the answer to the 5DII not the D800E...I'm not sure Canon are particualrly bothered at how Nikon splice their line up. The D700 was a huge sucess for Nikon photographers but a disaster for Nikon. It was essentially the same camera as their premium D3...but for a lot less and it totally raided the sales of their flagship. So when it came around to the D700's replacement, the cold reality of a consistent product line up forced Nikon to totally change the direction for that camera line. It's the kind of mistake which Canon rarely gets it self into. They are far more cautious and wiser with their products. Look at the 5D -> 5DII -> 5DIII...it's an evolution which doesn't confuse or frustrate their customer base. Take a look at the 1Dx and 5DIII....neither eat the sales of each other, quite the opposite they compliment. The problem Canon has with the 7DII is that it is a direct challenger to the 1Dx...and the 70D has filled the niche which the 7D once held. So one has to wonder how or where Canon will take the 7DII. It's slow to arrive becuase Canon are thinking about that camera very carefully. 

273
Lenses / Re: New Wide Angles Lenses in 2013 [CR2]
« on: January 10, 2014, 05:15:18 AM »
^ Posting web sized pictures to justify your point of view is pretty silly, unless they are 100% crops. The poor corner sharpness of the 16-35L II (and 17-40L) has been proven over and over again.

They are mediocre when compared to other L zoom-lenses like the 70-200 2.8 IS II and 24-70L II, and they pale in comparison to the Nikon 14-24.

Time for an update! But the same thing can be said about a boat load of other lenses from Canon. :-\

So you think those things you listed will make a great image any more sellable? No it won't...so I would say that the metric by which you judge a lens is way off base...and I'm sure that Canon are in no hurry to replace it becuase it's still selling well.
The sun star image would be hard to do with a 14-24mm lens...sure it might be sharper....although at f16 I seriously doubt there will be much difference in sharpness. The front element on the 14-24 is so bulbous that it's very flare prone. The 16-35IIL is very good at handling flare, far beter that the new 24-70IIL which every one seems to rave about.
The same is true with the lower image of the light house. The 14-24mm is hard to use filters (not impossible, but a PITA) and the flare issue is a serious concearn to a landscape photographer....but of corse if your only metric is wide open sharpness then yes the 14-24mm is a great lens too.

274
EOS Bodies / Re: Where are Canons innovation?
« on: January 10, 2014, 05:09:35 AM »
But innovation is mandatory for all companies.

Certainly, at least for tech companies.  But the point of the OP's thread was that Canon isn't innovating.  Fastest frame rate in a dSLR.  Most cross-type AF points with the widest spacing. Smallest dSLR. Supertele lenses that are >25% lighter than their predecessors.  Dual pixel AF. 

The issue isn't Canon not innovating, it's that people define innovation as developing only those products/features they personally want.  I don't shoot video with a dSLR and when I'm using Live View, I'm not in a rush.  By the logic of many people bashing Canon for not innovating, I should not call dual pixel AF an innovation, because it doesn't benefit me.  But it is innovative, as even the OP has acknowledged.

Canon have had so many firsts over the years. Some of their features are still way ahead of the competition.
When I look at their camera and lens cataloge and then go and look at the competition...Canon's stuff is generally better and more advanced. I have an 85mm f1.2 II L...I love it, I have a TS-e 17L and it's amazing, I have a pair of 5DIII's and they are the best camera's I've ever used. I have a 400mm f2.8 L IS and it's an amazing lens, I have a 8-15mm L fisheye....it's brilliant.
Canon when they innovate generally get it right first time. Their AF system / mount is quite old now...but it's still state of the art. Other brands often come around to Canon's thinking over time. Canon were the first to go CMOS....everyone else was mad on CCD chips....but look at the market now.

275
EOS Bodies / Re: Will Canon Answer the D4s? [CR2]
« on: January 10, 2014, 05:00:26 AM »
Canon doesn't have to answer the D4s. It needs to answer the D800(e).

No, they really don't. The 5DIII was the answer, and it has outsold the D800 and far outsold the D800E.

I still think it's possible we'll see a high MP sensor from Canon in the future, not as an 'answer' but rather to capture a part of the market they feel may be untapped.  But we'll only see that if Canon feels there's enough of a market for it.  I wonder if the D800 sales might be pointing them in another direction...

Yep, there's a world of difference between corporate sales spin and market realities...Canon are masters of weighing the two in a fine balance. I would take a balanced and versatile camera like the 1DX or 5DIII over the crazy specs of the D800E any day. 

276
Lenses / Re: The 10 Oldest Canon Lenses in Production
« on: January 10, 2014, 04:57:46 AM »
I have 100/2 and 200/2.8 and they NEED replacement - 100 have horrible purple fringing, 200 needs IS.

The 200mm f2.8 II L which I used to own was SO sharp it was possibly sharper than the 70-200 f2.8 L IS II which I replaced it with. It was a stunning optic and rediculously cheap for it's performance. A real sleeper lens!

It's funny when I look at the age of these lenses and often over looked / unloved lenses....take a look at Nikkor's lens catalogue. A lot of them are a LOT older!

277
I agree, I have all of the Canon fast primes from the 24IIL up to the 135L and I have to say that the 50 f1.2L is the weakest and softest performer in terms of optics of all the primes. Its a shame but true, its a good lens but not a great one. It pales next to the 85mm f1.2 II L and 35mm f1.4 L in just about every respect. But sadly, it's still the best performing 50mm available on the Canon ef mount when shooting wide open. I'm just waiting for a 50mm f1.2 II L to come along and rock my world....
+1 - Like you, I have owned all of them (and still own most of them), and the 50L is the weakest of the L primes, and that's why I sold mine a few months ago.  I soon realized that for it's purposes (portraits at f/1.2-2) and general shooting at f/8-f/16, it's a great lens.  the 24-70 f/2.8 II is sharper and performs better in tests, but when I look at the final image, the 50L is just better in my eyes, and f/2.8 is a poor substitute for f/2 or larger apertures when it comes to portraits.  I'm mighty interested in the Sigma and a future 50L II, but for now, I've realized that the 50L gives me great results even if it's not as great as its siblings.

Yup and as I've said so many time before...sharpness is just one measurable component of a lens, it shouldn't  be a deciding factor, but an added bonus. Unfortunately, so many photographers choose optics purely based on sharpness reviews. The 50L really does offer a nice view on the world and offers a great look to the final images. Just a little softer than other L's as it struts it's stuff. I'm more of a 35/85 combo guy. Recently I did a few portraits at a conference using my 24IIL and 50L and fell in love with that combo all over. 

278
Canon General / Re: What is the problem with Canon
« on: January 09, 2014, 11:07:16 AM »
It takes several years to spec, design and productionise a camera. From a paper concept to a boxed product takes around 2 years, the top tier pro stuff has a lot of testing which causes it to take even longer. To speed things up, some parts are designed as modular units, the AF system, Shutter mechanism etc.
Some of the development time can be spread out across multiple cameras to spread the engineering load and time across multiple business units. This is why the 1DX and 5DIII were co-developed. Both teams were utilised to create the two cameras with a lot of the tech shared and co-developed. Once developed, Canon will want to re-use this tech as much as possible because the engineering effort is expensive and slow. You can be sure the AF system in the 1DX and 5DIII took a very long time to develop.
Sensor tech takes even longer to develop, the number of MP on a chip is quite simple to etch. It's a simple task, but to re-engineer the entire signal path of the chip will take a lot of effort / time and cash to get right.
Canon are sure to have begun that chip work and it is in their interest to bring it to market ASAP, but it takes as long as it takes...unfortunatly.

279
EOS Bodies / Re: Will Canon ditch the AA Filter?
« on: January 09, 2014, 10:57:50 AM »
Or at least make as weak as on the 70d.  The image comparisons of the 70d vs. the 6d etc points to the idea that the best of Canon lenses can resolve the difference between the AA filter on the 6d and the smaller pixel size/weaker AA filter on the 70d and heck it looks pretty darn good.

Hoping the M-3 is dual pixel, and weak AA filter.

When Canon said the dual pixel is a game changer - perhaps this is part of the change???

I can't speak for the 6D as I've never tried one. But the 5DIII I am very familiar with along with the whole 5D linage. The 5DIII has the weakest grade AA filter of any of the 5D series. It's really noticable at times.

280
Third Party Manufacturers / Re: Nikon D610 yes D600 minor upgrade!
« on: January 09, 2014, 06:36:24 AM »
Nikon really dropped the ball with the D800 and D600. Canon have really picked up their game with the 1Dx, 5DIII and 6D. The new 610 specs look very much like a feature plugged responce to the 5DIII and 6D.
If it were a response to the 6D, it would have GPS and Wi-Fi.  Unless by that, you mean it's a response to the 6D not flinging oil all over the sensor.  :D
It's not a response to 6D... we all know it's a response to D600...  :P

... as was the 6d, Canon would have never released it without the pressure from Nikon.

We could (or rather not start) to argue Canon vs. Nikon systems and specs vs. reality all day long, but from what I've seen Nikon's updated camera leaves very little to be desired and the trolling level of some of the posts above proves that Canon die hards are at a loss to find any real arguments :-o

RGB metering, silent shutter, 100% viewfinder, 6fps, f8 autofocus, 39 af points, 24mp ff for under $2000, oh my, this is throwing down the gauntlet.

I remember reading an interview with Canon's DSLR director from a few years back (he was a newly appointed exec at the time). He talked about the need to unify the 1D series into a single camera and splitting the 5D into two models for two markets. One would be pro-ed up and the other consumered down. So on hind sight, the 1Dx / 5DIII and 6D are the products of his direction as opposed to any marketing / product pressure from Canon. It's quite clear that Nikon tried to splice into Canon's range and not the other way round. So the D700 was sitting in the gap between the 5D and 1Ds III.
lets face it, the 5DIII really is the 3D we all wanted and then some. Sure 35mp would have been nice, but the current camera is easily the most versatile from any camera manufacturer to date and is a PJ / wedding photographer's wet dream. 

281
If you can't get sharp photos with a 1.2L, then YOUR technique is not right for this lens.

That L lens is lovely but has limitations that many on this thread want nothing to do with -- it is not the sharpest lens and has rather inconsistent focusing (and not just at wide apertures), as has been spoken to numerous times on this thread. 

But implying we are using it wrong is probably not the kindest thing to say.

Maybe you could put things a bit more softly:  "Perhaps another 50mm lens is a better choice for some of us."

It certainly is for me. 

- A

I agree, I have all of the Canon fast primes from the 24IIL up to the 135L and I have to say that the 50 f1.2L is the weakest and softest performer in terms of optics of all the primes. Its a shame but true, its a good lens but not a great one. It pales next to the 85mm f1.2 II L and 35mm f1.4 L in just about every respect. But sadly, it's still the best performing 50mm available on the Canon ef mount when shooting wide open. I'm just waiting for a 50mm f1.2 II L to come along and rock my world....

282
It's funny when Nikon and Canon trolls go to war over announced cameras. I just sit back with some pop corn and watch the fire works...or I get out and do some shooting :D
My first camera was a Canon AV-1 (manual focus, and Av only). I chose Canon becuase that's what my Dad used and I could borrow his lenses. I've stuck with the brand for my whole life and I've never looked back. For me operate a lecia, Sony or Nikon is like handling aline technology....I mean after all, their dials go the wrong way :D

283


If the autofocus gives you a blurry image, isn't that the fault of the shooter? Or was there some other problem that explained why Rob Gilbraith was reporting lots of issues with the Canon 1D3 AF that Canon never seemed to be able to fix?



Canon couldn't repeat Galbraith's "issue", not really surprising when Galbraith couldn't repeat his issues when Canon sent factory staff to work with him either, they even went to Mexico or somewhere because he said he could only get it to do it at certain temperatures, so they took him to the temperature he said, and he still couldn't get consistent repeatable "issues".

And where is Mr Galbraith in the photo world now? Ah yes, no longer a pro photographer, no updated website, but a teacher in Canada.

Which is exactly the point: issues with AF in a pro level camera are far more likely to be the shooter than the equipment.

Quote
In sharp contrast (pun intended) to the D800 AF issues that were 100% verifiable, and repeatable, in any temperature, by a chimpanzee.

Since we're talking about the D4s and not the D800, this point is of no consequence to this discussion unless you'd like to use the 5D Mark II's AF as the means by which to judge the successor to the 1DX. Just saying.

It's interesting that no one here has mentioned the D4 lock ups...there's a number of uk pros who have been so frustrated with their D4's and had to switch to a D800 back up camera because their D4 units are so unreliable. I think this is the most likely reason that Nikon have pushed out the D4s so quickly. I dare say that a lot of pros will have their Nikon D4 cams swapped out under warrenty by Nikon. In the mean time, there's a growing user base for the 1Dx which are delighted by their cameras. 

284
Lenses / Re: I'm done - I have all the lenses I need
« on: January 07, 2014, 11:20:07 AM »
i've compared 85L and 135L, and for me i'd say 85L is THE lens; for portraiture..it's true that 135L a nice lens but she lack the ability to shot in dimmer ambient light. i shot city crowd at the evening and nothing's more pleasing than the 85L result.it was so damn bright and everything is visible, u get what you see(in term of luminance). i'm also agree with u that 85mm is more versatile in portraiture department since 85mm has the natural and classic type of FOV.
i think you have a good combination there with your 24-85-300mm eventhough for me  i would like 35-85-200L in my lineup  :D
I loved the 135, too, but it was always a bit tight for indoor portraits, even on FF.  The big thing that made me rethink the lens was reading a blog by wedding photographer Jeff Ascough who was talking about how the combination of high ISO bodies and the 70-200 2.8 IS II was allowing him to get shots he'd never dreamed of with the 135.  Obviously that doesn't overcome slow shutter speeds in extremely low light, but even then the 1 stop difference isn't huge.

I like the 135L a lot...but I use my 85IIL a lot more. I like the look I get from it and it's amazingly bright. It almost creates light. I use a 70-200 f2.8 II L a lot too, it's a fantastic lens and offers a great set of benefits; focal range, fast AF, bright f2.8, weather sealing and that great 4 stop IS unit....and it's great with teleconverters. But the 135L and 85IIL do offer a slightly better look in my opinion.
There's a lot to like about all three lenses!

285
Lenses / Re: I'm done - I have all the lenses I need
« on: January 07, 2014, 05:03:40 AM »
Let's hope I don't have re-buyer's remorse with the new Sigma:
http://www.dpreview.com/news/2014/01/06/sigma-announces-all-new-50mm-f1-4-dg-hsm-art-lens?utm_campaign=internal-link&utm_source=news-list&utm_medium=text&ref=title_0_6


It's about time some one made a really good 50mm....I just hope Sigma have nailed their AF and QA issues. It sure looks like a pretty lens!

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