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Messages - Etienne

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226
Pricewatch Deals / Re: Canon EOS 5D Mark III Body $2545
« on: August 13, 2013, 04:43:03 PM »
Holy crap!
btw ... what's the best deal anyone has seen on a 1DX?

227
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: Canon 2x and 1.4x mk3 extenders
« on: August 13, 2013, 03:21:03 PM »
Here's an extension tube combo I've used to good effect:

5DIII - 2X converter - 12mm extension tube - 50mm f/1.4   

This combo creates a pretty decent macro lens
Tip: focus the 50mm close before attaching to the extension tube
Set aperture at least f/8 to f/16

BTW - works well with the EOS-M+adapter as well... gains 1.6x crop factor

228
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: Canon 2x and 1.4x mk3 extenders
« on: August 13, 2013, 03:17:37 PM »
I tried this setup as well, but it didn`t work for me.

1dx, 1,4tc, but I only had the 25mm avaible, 2,0 tc and 400/2,8 IS II

I didn`t focus to infinity nor did autofocus work as well.

Any suggestion on custom settings?

25mm extension tube is probably pushing it too far.
They have had success with the 12mm only

229
Reviews / Re: Which camera should I buy for a first timer
« on: August 13, 2013, 01:27:57 AM »
Thank's everyone. I bought a Canon 600D/T3i. It comes with 18-55mm lenses.

What do you guys recommend for good lenses and accessories ?

I have a tripod and small bag where I can put the camera and one lens.


You are going to need all of the following to make a decent film:

Install Magic Lantern
Tokina 11-16 f/2.8 and a Canon 50 1.4 may be all you need.
Tiffen 77mm variable ND filter Must! Get a 58mm-77mm reducer so you can use the Tiffen on the 50 1.4 as well -this will get you all the shallow DOF you will ever need,even in daylight.

Audio gear is a must: Rode videomic pro, get a Zoom H4 or H6(better), boom pole. Bad audio ruins good footage everytime.
Tripod
Slider, if you can afford it.


 what about one of those weighted  inertia devices that look like a C.   those smooth out  hand held and walking  shots.

They are good for lightweight camcorders. I use a Shape bracket with dual hand grip  ( http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/734304-REG/Shape_wlb_PA1100_PAPARAZZI_I.html I mount the camera sideways and screw a hand grip on the end to get dual grip) This Paparazzi II looks good http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/734317-REG/Shape_wlb_PA1200PRO_PAPARAZZI_II_PRO.html.   Some people like the circular grips like this http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/381894-REG/Manfrotto_595B_595B_Fig_Rig_Camera.html .

I also use a shoulder brace (homemade one).


What's the paparazzi thing used for mind if I ask ?


Hand held camera work, and you can attach accessories like Audio recorder, mic, external monitor

230
EOS Bodies - For Video / Re: BMD 4K, EOS C100 or 5D3
« on: August 12, 2013, 05:32:03 PM »
BTW ...  Magic Lantern will have RAW video on the 5DIII soon.

231
EOS Bodies - For Video / Re: BMD 4K, EOS C100 or 5D3
« on: August 12, 2013, 05:31:14 PM »
Making business case for new camera, currently using 7d / 600d for production video and eng for event video.

Very keen on c100 as it will work well with current lenses (or at least, predictably given transition from aps-c to s35)
but niggling doubts as to go for 5D3 and new lenses (would need a tascam dr-60d) or (if it can be supplied) the bmd 4k.   

I don't need 4k yet, but our stage crews are buying a 4k projection and screens... 1080 looks great on their exsisting screens, but any camera I buy is going to be used in 3, 5 years time.

I threw the 5d in there as an option...  I don't need stills on this camera... My gut tells me go dedicated video camera route, but is the BMD just too out there?

Philip Bloom has used and reviewed a lot of cameras. At the end of one of his recent reviews he said that if he had to have one and only one camera he would choose the Canon 1D-C. It's about $12,000 but it shoots 4K in camera, no external boxes required, and in low light it practically creates photons out of nothing.

The 1Dx is half the price and may do everything but 4K in Camera.

If you're looking at C100 you're in the 1Dx ballpark

232
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: 5d Mark III or 6d or stick with 7d
« on: August 12, 2013, 05:24:56 PM »
I was pretty happy with my 7D, too, until I bought my 5Diii.  The differences between the two cameras are substantial.

The 5Diii's IQ is just way superior to that produced by the 7D.  It is a much less noisy camera -- much less noisy -- than the 7D.  I primarily consider myself a nature photographer.  With the 5Diii I can get excellent quality images at ISO 1600.   I find that the cutoff for the 7D is about ISO 400.  I find the images produced by the 5Diii to be denser, richer, and more saturated looking than with the 7D. 

The 5Diii also has a much superior autofocus than that of the 7D.  I primarily shoot using only the center point and I find that the 5Diii locks onto a subject much more quickly and much more accurately than does the 7D.

Finally, I find that the 5Diii's dynamic range is much superior to that of the 7D.  I get more detail in highlights and shadows with 5Diii than I ever did with the 7D.

I consider the 7D when it first came out, I really wanted the AF, FPS, etc, but I went for the 5dII at that time and never regretted it. Now with the 5DIII I have the best of both worlds. The 5DIII provides noticeably better IQ over the 5DII in every way, much more than the modest megapickle boost would suggest. The AF of course is great, but there's more to it than that.

The 5DIII is worth the extra $$

233
Reviews / Re: Which camera should I buy for a first timer
« on: August 12, 2013, 01:40:55 PM »
Thank's everyone. I bought a Canon 600D/T3i. It comes with 18-55mm lenses.

What do you guys recommend for good lenses and accessories ?

I have a tripod and small bag where I can put the camera and one lens.


You are going to need all of the following to make a decent film:

Install Magic Lantern
Tokina 11-16 f/2.8 and a Canon 50 1.4 may be all you need.
Tiffen 77mm variable ND filter Must! Get a 58mm-77mm reducer so you can use the Tiffen on the 50 1.4 as well -this will get you all the shallow DOF you will ever need,even in daylight.

Audio gear is a must: Rode videomic pro, get a Zoom H4 or H6(better), boom pole. Bad audio ruins good footage everytime.
Tripod
Slider, if you can afford it.


 what about one of those weighted  inertia devices that look like a C.   those smooth out  hand held and walking  shots.

They are good for lightweight camcorders. I use a Shape bracket with dual hand grip  ( http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/734304-REG/Shape_wlb_PA1100_PAPARAZZI_I.html I mount the camera sideways and screw a hand grip on the end to get dual grip) This Paparazzi II looks good http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/734317-REG/Shape_wlb_PA1200PRO_PAPARAZZI_II_PRO.html.   Some people like the circular grips like this http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/381894-REG/Manfrotto_595B_595B_Fig_Rig_Camera.html .

I also use a shoulder brace (homemade one).

234
Reviews / Re: Which camera should I buy for a first timer
« on: August 12, 2013, 01:23:35 PM »
Thank's everyone. I bought a Canon 600D/T3i. It comes with 18-55mm lenses.

What do you guys recommend for good lenses and accessories ?

I have a tripod and small bag where I can put the camera and one lens.

You are going to need all of the following to make a decent film:

Install Magic Lantern
Tokina 11-16 f/2.8 and a Canon 50 1.4 may be all you need.
Tiffen 77mm variable ND filter Must! Get a 58mm-77mm reducer so you can use the Tiffen on the 50 1.4 as well -this will get you all the shallow DOF you will ever need,even in daylight.

Audio gear is a must: Rode videomic pro, get a Zoom H4 or H6(better), boom pole. Bad audio ruins good footage everytime.
Tripod
Slider, if you can afford it.

235
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: 5d Mark III or 6d or stick with 7d
« on: August 12, 2013, 11:39:36 AM »
Just a friendly warning:

Once you shoot with a full frame you may never be fully satisfied with IQ from the crop cameras again.

236
Lenses / Re: What lens delivers the strongest background blur?
« on: August 11, 2013, 10:31:15 AM »
Note:  I signed up to this forum just so that I could reply to this thread, because I need to clarify the technical issues being discussed.

The formula referred to applies only when the background object is located at infinity, and shows that it is proportional to the entrance pupil diameter.  For a given fixed magnification, then, the compiled list is merely a list of lenses sorted by decreasing entrance pupil size.  Unfortunately, this information frequently fails to capture the most interesting behavior of the background blur of a lens, which is its diameter as a function of the distance away from the subject in focus.

For instance, it is possible to have two lenses, say Lens A and Lens B, such that for a given subject magnification the blur circle for objects "close behind" the subject is larger for Lens A than for Lens B, but the reverse is true for objects at infinity.  This occurs because (informally speaking) there are competing factors that contribute to the size of the blur disk.  To complicate matters further, the background distance at which this "switch" occurs is itself a function of the subject magnification.

One such example of this phenomenon is an 85/1.2 versus a 300/2.8 lens.  When both are shot around 1:10 magnification (which is near MFD for both real-world implementations), the former is predicted to have about 2x the blur circle diameter up to about 1 foot behind the subject, decreasing until the two have equal blur at about 11-12 feet behind the subject, after which the 300/2.8 will dominate.  What is happening is that a faster f-number will increase the blur at distances close to the subject, but a longer focal length will increase the blur of very distant objects because of perspective.

To further illustrate, suppose we compare a 50/1.0 against a 200/4 lens.  Both lenses have the same entrance pupil diameter at infinity focus (P = 50mm), so at the same subject magnification, a very distant background should have approximately the same amount of blur.  But which lens should blur objects closer to the subject more?  The answer to this question is one of the reasons why the (out of production) EF 50/1.0L is especially coveted for the way it images--it's not merely for the light-gathering ability of f/1.0.  The combination of a relatively short focal length and a very fast aperture can result in images with a distinctive look, because it simultaneously delivers background blur while showing more of the background scene (owing to perspective), compared to a telephoto lens.  By no means is this everyone's cup of tea, but there is a technical explanation for this behavior.

Of course, the entire complexity of the lens design itself must be taken into account for a more real-world understanding of its blur characteristics.  Aberrations such as Petzval curvature, astigmatism, and spherical aberration, can significantly affect the way the blur looks off-axis.  But for most well-corrected designs, the above holds true, especially for paraxial rays.

+1

This is a very clear and necessary addition to the conversation.

237
EOS Bodies / Re: Crop sensors need cropped lenes
« on: August 11, 2013, 09:35:39 AM »
I think dgatwood is referring to the internal elements.  While you might not be able to change the front element size, ultimately an EF-S lens only needs to cover an APS-C sized imaging circle with a sharp image.  What's that?  A quarter of a FF image circle?  Surely you wouldn't need the same sized internal elements for that?  Or, if you do go with similar sized elements, you might be able to introduce manufacturing efficiencies to keep costs down (as you only need the centre of the element to be of high quality).  Either way, I'm sure an APS-C lens could be made cheaper or lighter.  How much?  Maybe not much.  Maybe a lot.  Dgatwood guesses a 5% weight reduction.  That seems pretty conservative.

However, given that EF lenses exist in the most likely focal lengths and apertures, I think they would have to sell for a noticeable discount on the EF lens price to have any market success.  Maybe they could also be part of a new lens mount.  These will mount on FF cameras, but work in "crop mode" only.

Real life example, and I have both of these sharp lenses:

Tokina 50-135 f/2.8 (FF equiv 80-212mm)   845g, 135mm long, uses 67mm filter
Canon 70-200 2.8 IS II     1490g, 199mm long, uses 77mm filter

I don't think the front element size is linearly connected to the aperture and focal length either. Look at the Canon 50 1.4 vs Sigma 50 1.4

238
Reviews / Re: Which camera should I buy for a first timer
« on: August 10, 2013, 10:04:17 PM »
I forgot to mention that my budget is in USD.

Sounds like am getting a T3i

Thank's everyone. I appreciate your replies. If I have any other questions I will ask here. I will let you guys know what my gear will be later.
I'd suggest you forgo a out of date T3i and consider a refurb t4i.  Its compatible with Canons new STM lenses which have smoother focusing for video.  The T3i is not optimized for a STM lens.  All future Canon DSLR's will likely be optimized for STM lenses.  The T4i and T5i are almost identical, so you don't need a T5i.  The T3i will not autofocus for video and does not have the touch screen.
When you do video with a STM lens, touching a point on the screen will cause the camera to smoothly change focus to the new point. 
You can trade in a worthless old Canon film slr or a broken power shot for a 15% percent discount off the refurb prices.  They are like new and have the same 1 year warranty as new.

Autofocus on T4i and T5i are worthless for filmmaking, They will hunt and are unreliable.
The T3i has handy 1080p digital zoom, and is cheaper at the same IQ
There are no good STM lenses yet, and who knows when they will be available.

239
Reviews / Re: Which camera should I buy for a first timer
« on: August 10, 2013, 12:54:23 PM »
Canon T3i (can be upgraded when you have more money). This camera also has useful digital zoom in movie mode.
Install Magic Lantern
Buy some good lenses: Tokina 11-16 f/2.8 and a Canon 50 1.4 may be all you need.
Tiffen 77mm variable ND filter Must! Get a 58mm-77mm reducer so you can use the Tiffen on the 50 1.4 as well -this will get you all the shallow DOF you will ever need,even in daylight.
You will need Audio gear: Rode videomic pro, get a Zoom H4 or H6(better)
Tripod
Slider, if you can afford it.

240
EOS Bodies / Re: Crop sensors need cropped lenes
« on: August 10, 2013, 12:33:01 PM »
I have a Tokina 50-135 f/2.8 equiv to 80-112 mm.
It's a great lens. Much smaller than my 70-200L 2.8 IS II. BONUS: It is par-focal and that makes a big difference in video.
Pair that with a Tokina 11-16 f/2.8 and it is a great light-weight package for crop.
You could also add Sigma 30 1.4 and/or Canon 50 1.4.

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