November 23, 2014, 10:14:01 PM

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Area256

Pages: 1 ... 4 5 [6] 7 8 ... 10
76
EOS Bodies / Re: 6D's Wifi Drain on Battery (?)
« on: December 10, 2012, 05:15:17 PM »
Just tried turning on the GPS and left it on for an hour. I have the update frequency set to 30 seconds. The battery dropped by just 2% according to the camera.  I'm inside a house, and for the first little bit it couldn't get a fix, but it locked on after a few minutes.  (outside the time to lock is about 30 seconds, not sure yet how accurate it is.)

I haven't tested the WiFi battery life, but my experience has been that using it actively causes the camera to heat up a lot.  Which explains why the 6D has more electrical shielding than other cameras in it's class.


77
EOS Bodies / Re: Memory Cards--What is the absolute best?
« on: December 10, 2012, 03:52:47 PM »
When I started in digital (back in 2003), I shot with SanDisk.  Then I had two SanDisk cards die on me, and switched to Lexar pro cards and haven't had an issue since.   Mind you that was 2003, and I could have just been unlucky...  It would be neat if someone actually did stats on how long the cards last and how reliable they are.  I only shoot Lexar since they haven't failed me once, but it could be SanDisk is way better now...

78
EOS Bodies / Re: 6D hands-on reviews by many websites..
« on: December 10, 2012, 12:46:20 PM »
Enough of these "amateur" categories.  A lot of professionals were shooting and still are shooting with 5D2 which we can say is beaten/on par on almost all camera features by 6D.

+1 ... esp. since a pro starting off with a business is completely different from a seasoned pro with a big budget and lots of assistants - if you're starting off €1000 can buy a (better) lens that make more sense for the business.

But as all marketing divisions know, people have an inherent need to sort things in a linear fashion with as little overlap as possible, but I wouldn't let that cloud the fact that a 5d3+Tamon24/70 will have worse iq than 6d+Canon24/70ii if you're not shooting sports and the af cannot keep up or have to rely on the non-center points.

I have to agree here. I think what is getting overlooked by some is that "professional" simply means one gets paid to take pictures. There is a little shop near where I live that takes children & baby pics- the owner there uses a T1i and 28-135 lens (plus alot of fancy studio lighting). Imagine my horror when we showed up & my wife shelled out $500 for all sorts of prints and frames. BUT I have to admit; photos came out pretty good actually, an in the end I was impressed with the quality of product she provided despite having "non-professional" equipment.

The gentleman that shot my wedding 4 years ago had a 5d classic; I'm sure he would have been thrilled with a 6D and still done a wonderful job. But put a 1Dx in the hands of my father in law, and you'd probably get a lot of nice photos of the back of your lens cap...

I am just a hobbyist myself, and plan on picking up a 6D anyway- but if I WAS starting a business as Marsu42 said, I agree 100%... I'd save the $1000 and use it towards glass/marketing/etc. Then when my company got huge of course I'd let my assistant use it :)

Long story short, to classify a 6D as only for amateur potraits or landscape I personally think is unfair. While many amateurs/hobbyists (myself included) will be the purchasers of 6Ds, I don't see why event photographers needing to replace a 5Dc or 5Dii wouldn't think this camera would work for them.

+1  I'm not sure where the idea that pro photographers have tons of money came from.  Sure some pro photographers have done very well for themselves, and can afford the 1Dx (or have their company buy it for them).  However, a small town wedding photographer who charges $1000 a shoot and does maybe 20-30 weddings a year, just can't afford to go with all 1Dx bodies - getting two cameras and the high end lenses would eat more than half his/her entire earnings. Even two 5D3s + lenses would be pushing it.

If I was going to start shooting pro studio/portraits or landscape (for prints), I think the 6D would be more than capable - subject to the limits my skill.  Just look at how many pros are shooting with the 5D2 and getting amazing results.

79
3. 6D is a bit smaller than 7D in my hand. It doesn't have the solid feel like 5D II, III, 7D etc...I feel like FF sensor in Rebel chassis.

It's small yes, but it's hardly a Rebel chassis.  The Rebel is all plastic, and not very good plastic at that.  It's somewhere between the 60D and 5D3/7D in build quality.  I'm quite sure it'll take more abuse than a Rebel or 60D, if not as much as a 5D3/7D.

80
I just upgraded from a 60D to a 6D.   I haven't used a 7D, so do take that into account.  Although since the sensor is about the same between the 60D and 7D, that part should be safe for me to compare.

First sharpness: I don't see any sharpness issues in your images.  Also remember that sharpness is affected by lighting, contrast, depth of field, and motion blur.  I think people tend to obsess over sharpness more than needed - great photos have awesome lighting and composition and tell a story or relay an emotion - and that comes from photographic skill and not sharpness.  Having said that the resolving power of a full frame is much better - you will capture more fine details on a full-frame.

Noise: The 6D is about 1.5 to 2 stops better than the 60D.  I find I can shoot at ISO 3200 and get results that look as good as ISO 800 on the 60D.  And ISO 400 is just as good as ISO 100 on the 60D - which means I can shoot at ISO 400, and set my shutter speed 2 stops faster - which is great for action shots.   Also when I say 2-stops better that's comparing the amount of noise I see in RAW files.  However the real world advantage is actually a little better since with more detail you can apply more NR and still keep the minimum required detail for most applications.

AF: I'm finding the AF on the 6D to be very good, it's at least as fast as the 60D to lock focus, and clearly faster in low light.  However my understanding is that the 7D has a great AF system for tracking moving subjects which are off center.  So if you are finding you use the tracking AF a lot, and/or are using the points far from the center of the frame, you may want to keep the 7D for that.  I find that with tuning, you can make the 6D's tracking fairly good, however you have to keep your subject near the center of the frame.

Speed and fps: The speed in terms of shutter lag, focus lock time, play back, ect. are all great.  In terms of fps well it's slower than other cameras, the 7D should get almost twice as many frames if you shoot in burst mode.

Build quality: The 7D is a tank, just check out some of the DigitalRev videos on it.  However, I'm quite pleased with my 6D's build quality, I can't see having any problems with it lasting for years.

Do I miss the crop sensor, not at all.  However I don't shoot at the far end of my lenses very much.  If you are often shooting at 200mm, and find that's not long enough, than the 7D will give you a small advantage there in terms of pixel density.  However if you just take your 6D file and crop it, you'll get fairly close to the same result.  And you get the advantage of having the 70mm giving a 70mm FOV, which could be useful depending on how you shoot.

Bottom line: Yes, the IQ in terms of noise and detail resolution is better on the 6D.  The AF is fast, but keep in mind the spread is limited.  I can work with the limited spread with limited "focus-and-recompose", but you'll have to consider how/what you shoot, and see if you could work with it or not.

81
EOS Bodies / Re: 6D hands-on reviews by many websites..
« on: December 09, 2012, 11:08:56 PM »
7D and 1D pro level
60D and 5 D are mid level prosumer grade
Rebel and 6 D consumer level

7D is going to have pro level features above and beyond the 6 D, with the only draw back being a crop sensor. Then again the current 7D wasn't priced above $2k.

I'd say the 60D is far closer to a Rebel, and the 6D far closer to a 5D series camera - especially in build quality and the number of "consumer" features.  The 6D is a surprisingly serious camera compared to the 60D, the AF may seem lacking in spec, but I'm finding it's a lot more usable than the 60D's especially for low light and tracking.

However, I think a better classification would be by photography type:

General pro-photography (weddings, random assignment work, etc.): 5D3
Sports/journalism/wildlife: 7D and 1D
Landscape and portraits: 6D
Easy to use (and "cheap") for casual photo enthusiasts: Rebel and 60D.

Then doesn't really matter what the price difference between the 6D and 7D is.  If you shoot a lot of sports or wildlife, you get the 7D (or 1Dx if you can afford it).  If you shoot a lot of landscape and portraits (where the FF sensor is important) you get the 6D.  They become different camera's for different markets.   The 7D mark II could have 10fps, be build like a tank, have a 40 point all cross type AF, and two Digic 5+ processors, and sell for around $2k just like the 6D.  And people will just buy what works best for them.  Much like what happened with the 5D2 and the current 7D.

I think the 5D3 is really a new class: namely the general purpose pro camera; mostly to satisfy the pro market that doesn't want to (or can't) pay for a 1Dx, and was finding the 5D2 (or 6D) too lacking.

82
...I will have a 60D and 6D tomorrow for some rough analysis.

Let me know what you think of the way 6D renders colors and lighting dynamics. Now that I've moved on from testing to actual pictures, I am not liking what I am seeing in this respect. I'm shooting RAW and the the 6D files have a very different character than do 5D2 files imo, and not in a good way.

I processed a few shoots of the same scene with same settings (ISO 100)/lens with the 60D and 6D, then looked at the RAWs in CPP.  Both were basically identical in terms of color and DR (although CPP was applying the same tone curve so that should be expected).  I don't think there was a major difference between the 60D and the 5D2.  So I'm not sure what's happening in your case.

I also tried pushing the shadows in both, and didn't notice any real difference between the 60D and 6D.  A tad better in the 6D, but nothing to write home about.  The area the 6D really seems to shine is high ISO, where it clearly dominates the 60D.  But again, color looks the same on both.

I just tried Capture One.  Images look almost exactly the same as CPP.  And I got very impressive shadow detail recovery on the 6D in Capture One.  Sadly I think your camera must be a bad copy.

83
...I will have a 60D and 6D tomorrow for some rough analysis.

Let me know what you think of the way 6D renders colors and lighting dynamics. Now that I've moved on from testing to actual pictures, I am not liking what I am seeing in this respect. I'm shooting RAW and the the 6D files have a very different character than do 5D2 files imo, and not in a good way.

I processed a few shoots of the same scene with same settings (ISO 100)/lens with the 60D and 6D, then looked at the RAWs in CPP.  Both were basically identical in terms of color and DR (although CPP was applying the same tone curve so that should be expected).  I don't think there was a major difference between the 60D and the 5D2.  So I'm not sure what's happening in your case.

I also tried pushing the shadows in both, and didn't notice any real difference between the 60D and 6D.  A tad better in the 6D, but nothing to write home about.  The area the 6D really seems to shine is high ISO, where it clearly dominates the 60D.  But again, color looks the same on both.

84
Contests / Re: Gura Gear Giveaway!
« on: December 07, 2012, 03:22:06 PM »
I'd like to win!  One can never have enough awesome camera bags!

85
I understand we're talking about focus speed and sensitivity of the central point, but has anyone tested the outer points with fast glass in terms of focus accuracy? Most of the tests I've found on the web, like Roger's, concern the central point exclusively.
I'm asking this because 11 AF points should be enough for me, if they're all really usable. Maybe the only situation for which I actually need the outer points is when shooting with a very shallow DoF and placing the focus zone very off-center, when composition would change too much and the focus-and-recompose technique would sure fail. (If the subject is not so close to the camera, then the angle changes little when recomposing and I can usually take a sharp pic, even with a shallow DoF.)
I sure appreciate -3 EV sensitivity, but in very low-light situations I won't be playing around with composition anyway, and having one reliable, sensitive central point sounds good enough, IMO. The precision of the outer points concerns me the most, for I can't rely very much on them when shooting with my 60D, even in reasonably well-lit situations.
(Sorry if it's been discussed before; I searched, but found nothing.)
Thanks!
Daniel

I suspect the precision of the outer points on the 6D will be at best the same or a little worse than the 60D...

The main problem with precision of the outer points on any camera (save the 5D3), is that they are normally f/5.6 sensitive points, which aren't as precise as the f/2.8 sensitive points sometimes found on the center AF point(s).

All of the 60D's AF points are f/5.6 cross type, and there is an additional f/2.8 cross type sensor overlapping the center point.   Since the 6D's outer points are f/5.6 line sensors, I'd expect, assuming good light and contrast in the right direction, their precision will be about the same.

There will likely differences in how well they respond with different light and target sizes.  And the fact they are only line sensors, will do other things to effect the hit rate.  Just how much of a difference is hard to quantify / no one has tested yet.

Sadly I don't have the equipment to test this formally, but I will have a 60D and 6D tomorrow for some rough analysis.

Also this is kind of the reality of almost all modern AF systems... The outer points tend to have less precision than the inner points, which is annoying since aside from action photography, the use of the outer points is almost always for fast lenses where focus-and-recompose breaks down - and where precision is extra important..  I tend to use LV and manual focus when I'm working with close subjects and fast lenses.

86
EOS Bodies - For Video / Re: Canon EOS 6D Service Advisory
« on: December 06, 2012, 08:57:13 PM »
We also enabled 1/8000s shutter speed, 1/200s x-sync and higher fps by simply changing the limits in the firmware.

Sadly I don't think they can do that...  The max shutter and x-sync are likely limitations of the cheaper/simpler hardware used - I suspect it's the same deal for the D600's max shutter speed.  The other things would be nice to get unlocked though - but hey every company cripples their lower end firmware - at least we have ML.

87
EOS Bodies - For Stills / Re: DigitalRevTV: Canon 6D vs Nikon D600
« on: December 06, 2012, 04:23:55 PM »
Both cameras are great on their own, but point for point, the Nikon wins this one overall for sure.

Competition is a great thing.  Neither Canon or Nikon would be as good at this point without it.  The 5D2 forced Nikon to increase sensor resolution and add video to full frame cameras, and the D600 will force Canon to put more into its next 6D style camera and hopefully improve their sensor tech.  And the 6D will likely force Nikon to integrate WiFi and GPS, and improve their AF low light performance.

I'm getting a 6D and I think it'll work just find for my needs (I have too much Canon gear to make it worth switching over the differences), but kudos to Nikon for raising the bar.

88
Lighting / Re: Help with lighting for portraits...
« on: December 06, 2012, 12:25:13 PM »
I have another suggestion.  Get this kit from B&H from the same circular:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/425220-REG/Impact_DFUMK_Digital_Flash_Umbrella_Mount.html

Then get another 430EX II, I would purchase new right now given the $45 rebate on through December

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/571297-USA/Canon_2805B002_430EX_II_Speedlite_TTL.html

Then get two pairs of the Cactus V5 radio transceivers, the Hobby videos, and you will have your hands full with fun projects for a good long while.

http://www.gadgetinfinity.com/cactus-wireless-flash-transceiver-v5-duo.html

+1 That would make an awesome kit.  And you could even make it cheaper by getting an off-brand manual flash. 

I think that if you want to be mobile, you can choose one of two paths.  The first is the Strobist approach, with relatively inexpensive E-TTL or manual capable speedlights.  David Hobby has a fantastic video series on how to get great results. I bought this after seeing him and Joe McNally on the Flashbus tour (which was cool, but this video is a better learning experience). I have a 580 EX, a 430 EX and a 430 EX II, an Orbis ring light, a couple of inexpensive stands, clamps, umbrellas and softboxes.  Will try to post some results fairly soon, still getting the hang of it. My challenge is finding the time and good subjects.

http://strobist.blogspot.com/2011/01/introducing-strobist-lighting-in-layers.html


Also +1. 

The thing I love about the strobist set-up is how portable it can be.  I often work with small light stand, umbrella, 580EX II, and v5 triggers - which makes a great fill light kit for outdoor portraits, and the best part is, I can fit it all in a back-pack, and take it anywhere. 

For work inside I just add a few cheap manual flashes, stands, and modifiers, and I'm all set for studio work.   The only real drawback to the strobist way is that you need to keep charging batteries, and the recycle times are longer.  So if you want to shoot fast, for a long time, studio strobes are better.  Also you don't get a modeling light with flashes like you do with studio strobes - and having a modeling light can be very useful to see where your shadows will be. 

89
EOS Bodies / Re: Canon 6D Under-Exposing?
« on: December 05, 2012, 11:34:40 PM »
Ok, the author of the original article is getting some strange results (and we may actually get to blame this on Nikon - I'm not a fan boy, but hey this is CR ;) ).

I'll quote the interesting part here:

Quote
The images you’re looking at seem to indicate the converse – that it’s the D600 that’s overexposing. I suspected this might be the case, which is why I’ve posed this entire piece as a question and an ongoing series of discoveries.
Source:  http://www.borrowlenses.com/blog/2012/12/is-the-canon-6d-under-exposing/  (Post Update)

It looks like the D600 may be unusually sensitive (comparied to the D800, 5D2/3, and 6D).  I'm still blaming the jpeg engines (likely Nikon's d600 engine) for this strangeness however.  Have to wait until he posts some RAW images, or someone else does this test to be sure though.

The lens he is using could also be an issue, but generally the T-stop difference shouldn't be much between similar lenses.

90
Canada / Re: 6D arrives in Canada?
« on: December 05, 2012, 11:14:28 PM »
The Waterloo Henry's has one on hold for me (I'm picking it up on Friday).  I'm not sure if they have any stock beyond the holds or not though.   If you want to get one from Henry's, call and ask them to put one on hold for you when it comes in.  They won't charge you anything, or obligate you to buy it, but it'll mean you are one of the first people to get access the local stock.

Pages: 1 ... 4 5 [6] 7 8 ... 10