May 25, 2015, 09:33:31 AM

Recent Posts

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61
Photography Technique / Re: fail
« Last post by jrista on Today at 12:18:47 AM »
No. No 'natural color' but just a part of the spectrum of ambient light absorbed and reflected and observed with the human visual system. Your thinking is wrong.
Get acquainted with the science of vision before you make arguments about it.

Your entirely missing the point, but that isn't surprising on these forums. Why not do a couple searches and read some of the articles I am talking about? Your talking spectrum, I'm talking psychology. Missing the point. (Why does everyone around here miss the point 99% of the time? Meh.)

WHo do you think you are fooling?
You do not know what the point is so you do not have one.
Psychology...give me a break.  You know nothing about it!

Ah, bluster. The hallmark of the man without an argument. Nice meeting you, martti. You'll fit right in here. Your a pea in the pod.
62
Canon General / Re: Who's getting what/wish list
« Last post by Zeidora on Today at 12:18:42 AM »
I:'m waitinng for t he 1DX-II and the Zeiss crushing 35/1.4LII, 50/1.2LII, 85/1.2LIII and 135/2.0LII primes.

well, there's some wishful thinking on lenses ;-)

My wish list just has one item on it: 5dsr, should be fulfilled late June, it's on preorder :-)
Toying with the new Cognysis Stackshot interface, and a couple of ~27" IPS 4k displays.
63
Black & White / Re: Black and White Infrared
« Last post by yorgasor on Today at 12:03:07 AM »
I've done some IR shooting with my Canon 5D, 5D3, and Nikon D3s.  The 5D works best, as it has a lesser IR filter on the sensor.  The 5D3 and D3s both require very long exposures (on the order of 4-30 seconds, depending on the aperture). 

The nice thing with the old Nikon AIS lenses is that they have a red dot on the focus ring.  You focus as normal with the IR filter off, put the filter on, and then turn the focus ring so that the red dot is where the previous focus level was set to.  It removes the guessing I had to do with the other lenses I used.

The coolest thing I discovered is that the Voightlander 20mm f/3.5 has super crazy flaring when the IR filter is added.  Check out this most spectacular IR photo:

Mars Lake by Ron Yorgason, on Flickr
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Santa Ana Train Station, with 21mm conversion

65
Santa Ana Train Station, with 21mm conversion
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Santa Ana Train Station, with 21mm conversion

67
EOS Bodies / Re: EOS 5D Mark IV Testing Has Begun [CR2]
« Last post by ishdakuteb on May 24, 2015, 11:47:52 PM »
Neuro, you obviously don't understand :)

Flashes are only for use indoors... and indoors you don't need lens hoods...

No real photographer uses fill flash as that would be altering the lighting conditions and therefore un-natural.... do that and your pictures will be banned from National Geographic ....
Don, I am not really sure about national geographic rule on capturing people images, but for landscape, it is not allowed to move/clean up, even a leave on the ground, or alter the scene during post process.  You have stated that "no real photographer" uses fill flash outdoor and it should be used indoor only.  This was what I understand when I first started to learn journalism.  However, it is not completely right.  Yes, for journalism, you do not need it since who care about hard shadow appearing under eyes, nose, etc...  But for wedding, outdoor portrait photographers, and fashion photographers, they either use one of the following or combination of them under certain situation:
1. Reflector, or
2. Flash, or
3. Constant light such as Lowell iLight (kinda hot when using it), Ice Light (licensed to Jerry Ghionis), etc...

I have been learning about light in the past almost 3 years and still do (since I love journalism), plus keeping track of number of renown journalism photographers (most of them are wedding photographers from all around the world) so that why I pretty much have my confident in saying this.  Even Cliff Mautner, a master of natural light, still has to use flash in certain situations.  In short, nothing is absolute and again I am not really sure about National Geographic rule on capturing people...

Feel free to correct me if I am wrong...
you are right.... but did you realize that I was poking fun....

I am a big believer in using whatever the appropriate tool is to capture the image to the best of one's abilities and not to be bound by perceived rules. Fill flash is one of those very useful tools.... who hasn't taken a portrait shot with light from the back (sunset background is one example).... without a fill flash you are shooting a silhouette...

LOL... No wonder I can not find that rule posting on National Geographic, about the landscape rule, I have known for a little more than years via B&H but I did not really care until I recently decided to learn about landscape...
68
Photography Technique / Re: fail
« Last post by martti on May 24, 2015, 11:39:02 PM »
No. No 'natural color' but just a part of the spectrum of ambient light absorbed and reflected and observed with the human visual system. Your thinking is wrong.
Get acquainted with the science of vision before you make arguments about it.

Your entirely missing the point, but that isn't surprising on these forums. Why not do a couple searches and read some of the articles I am talking about? Your talking spectrum, I'm talking psychology. Missing the point. (Why does everyone around here miss the point 99% of the time? Meh.)

WHo do you think you are fooling?
You do not know what the point is so you do not have one.
Psychology...give me a break.  You know nothing about it!
69
EOS Bodies / Re: EOS 5D Mark IV Testing Has Begun [CR2]
« Last post by Don Haines on May 24, 2015, 11:35:11 PM »
Neuro, you obviously don't understand :)

Flashes are only for use indoors... and indoors you don't need lens hoods...

No real photographer uses fill flash as that would be altering the lighting conditions and therefore un-natural.... do that and your pictures will be banned from National Geographic ....

Don, I am not really sure about national geographic rule on capturing people images, but for landscape, it is not allowed to move/clean up, even a leave on the ground, or alter the scene during post process.  You have stated that "no real photographer" uses fill flash outdoor and it should be used indoor only.  This was what I understand when I first started to learn journalism.  However, it is not completely right.  Yes, for journalism, you do not need it since who care about hard shadow appearing under eyes, nose, etc...  But for wedding, outdoor portrait photographers, and fashion photographers, they either use one of the following or combination of them under certain situation:
1. Reflector, or
2. Flash, or
3. Constant light such as Lowell iLight (kinda hot when using it), Ice Light (licensed to Jerry Ghionis), etc...

I have been learning about light in the past almost 3 years and still do (since I love journalism), plus keeping track of number of renown journalism photographers (most of them are wedding photographers from all around the world) so that why I pretty much have my confident in saying this.  Even Cliff Mautner, a master of natural light, still has to use flash in certain situations.  In short, nothing is absolute and again I am not really sure about National Geographic rule on capturing people...

Feel free to correct me if I am wrong...
you are right.... but did you realize that I was poking fun....

I am a big believer in using whatever the appropriate tool is to capture the image to the best of one's abilities and not to be bound by perceived rules. Fill flash is one of those very useful tools.... who hasn't taken a portrait shot with light from the back (sunset background is one example).... without a fill flash you are shooting a silhouette...
70
Option 1.  I'd bring the 6D, 70D, 16-35, 70-300 and pick up the 50 f/1.8.  With the 6D brand new with US warranty for 1250, you're not going to lose that much on resale when you consider that you'll have it for a while before upgrading to the next FF body.
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