August 22, 2014, 07:41:19 PM

Author Topic: European travel?  (Read 9901 times)

schmidtfilme

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Re: European travel?
« Reply #15 on: April 04, 2013, 04:22:29 AM »
About Munich - anything specific you want to see there? I personally don't like Munich that much and suggest you visit Nuremberg and close by Bamberg instead. Of course if you have something specific you are interested in Munich then it is different.
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tomscott

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« Last Edit: April 04, 2013, 04:31:34 AM by tomscott »
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Deva

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Re: European travel?
« Reply #17 on: April 04, 2013, 04:33:33 AM »
As for Paris, the most obvious places for a first visit include Notre Dame, the Louvre, Montmartre, the Champs-Élysées and the Arc de Triomphe (floodlit at night probably photographs better). Musee D'Orsay has also been mentioned, and is highly recommended, however it's obviously best for looking at paintings rather than taking pictures.

If you're looking for something a little more unusual, try the Père Lachaise Cemetery, host to a huge number of famous people and interesting memorials - everyone from Jim Morrison, Edith Piaf to Oscar Wilde are there to be found. Continuing the death theme, you might also consider the Paris Catacombs, with it's caverns of walls of carefully arranged bones.

Les Invalides, which includes complex of museums devoted to the military history of France (look out for the chest plate from Waterloo punctured through by a cannonball, and the great coat preserved as it was taken off, still covered in the mud from the trenches of the First World War), also makes for an interesting visit - for a really dramatic moment (and photograph), visit Napoleon's tomb which can be found there. The bridge crossing the Seine that leads up to Les Invalides is also one of the most decorated in Paris - sorry, I can't remember its name.

From the top of my head, one other building you might appreciate is the Pantheon Paris - it used to have a Faucault's pendulum (and maybe still does). In it's crypt are several French people, including Victor Hugo, Voltaire and Marie Curie. Hm, there we are, back to death again.

My one tip on gear would be not to bother with a tripod - it'll weigh you down badly, be awkward to carry, and where you might want to use one (for example, inside dimly light buildings), it'll either be not appropriate, or you can find a nearby surface to rest against. I like to travel with what I can fit in my pockets, so no struggling with getting things into or out of bags. So one camera + lens round my neck, and 2 alternative lenses in 2 pockets. You might like to have more with you, then select what you need for each day, according to the itinery. My "standard" is 17-40mm, 70-300mm (fits in a generous pocket!), and 24-70mm round my neck. I might swap the 70-300mm for 8-15mm if I'm going to be inside all day, or 100mm macro if there's going to be something suitable (e.g. gardens).

axtstern

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Re: European travel?
« Reply #18 on: April 04, 2013, 04:44:31 AM »
Now to give you an idea for southern Germany:

If you would go as a normal tourist I would say avoid the tourist traps, but if you go for pictures, then descend right into them because there you get your motive and interesting people around it.

Munich itself: You need sunshine! You can do of course make master class pictures under a clouded sky but you would need time to find the right spots. Walking through the City will cost you about 4 hours and a 24-70 for outside and something more like a wide 1:1.4 will do the trick for inside.

If there is no sunshine:

Deutsches Museum
Plan careful what to see, for a full round you would need several days
http://www.google.de/search?q=deutsches+museum&hl=en&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=uDJdUdXwN4OGswbNlIGYBw&sqi=2&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAQ&biw=1382&bih=773&safe=active

Hofbräu Haus
Choose time and place to sit careful for best shots, don’t expect the food to be outstanding, avoid asking which table Adolf preferred etc...
http://www.google.de/search?q=deutsches+museum&hl=en&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=uDJdUdXwN4OGswbNlIGYBw&sqi=2&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAQ&biw=1382&bih=773&safe=active#hl=en&safe=active&tbm=isch&sa=1&q=hofbrauhaus&oq=Hofbr&gs_l=img.1.0.0l10.142690.144162.0.151600.5.5.0.0.0.0.292.645.3j1j1.5.0...0.0...1c.1.8.img.8rq8XpMwkqA&bav=on.2,or.r_qf.&bvm=bv.44770516,d.Yms&fp=f677f99ed6bcee65&biw=1382&bih=773

If you can afford to travel:
Go to Passau, do some Danube travel to get this "Sissy" feeling.
If you did not check the churches in Munich check them here.
The Bavarian baroque style churches can be fascinating. I spent half an hour in one, listening to the sermon of the priest while taking pictures but was not able to actually detect him in all the ornament.
A few minutes to the south you find a city called Jochenstein which has a water lock one side is German the other one is Austrian.
 
http://www.google.de/search?q=passau&hl=en&safe=active&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=9DRdUf7bKYWGtAa-qICwAg&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAQ&biw=1382&bih=773

Finally the holy grail of Japanese tourists: Neuschwanstein
Timing is everything here, be late enough to avoid fog, be early enough to avoid the sons of Nippon.
Choose you gear wisely, you have to climb a lot, if you want to find a motive requiring your 70-200 then you need to climb even more. Behind the castle is after a short walk through the woods a bridge ( Marienbruecke).  Some well-prepared tourists (usually the Russians) bring name engraved locks with them and tie them to the ropes of the bridge. Visiting the other two castles in walking distance actually allows for better framing of Neuschwanstein than visiting the castle itself.
http://www.google.de/search?q=neuschwanstein&hl=en&safe=active&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=fDxdUaX7BIaWswaflIDADA&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAQ&biw=1382&bih=773

Even more time at hand?
Regensburg visit the Walhalla
Be there early in the morning, this joint is best enjoyed with the morning fog still in the valley. If you are early enough you will have the monument almost for yourself allone. Gives you an idea where the typical german character deformations come from... :-)
http://www.google.de/search?q=walhalla+temple+germany&hl=en&safe=active&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=ZTtdUfWGF5HEtAbzq4G4Bg&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAQ&biw=1382&bih=773

AmbientLight

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Re: European travel?
« Reply #19 on: April 04, 2013, 04:48:18 AM »
@Deva:
I generally agree with your comment regarding tripods, but for night time photography a tripod may come in quite handy, especially if used extensively for night time exposures.

If there is no opportunity for night time photography, then a tripod would indeed be a waste of space and effort, but things look differently, if there are lots of opportunities. Not everyone will bring in a 1D-X and f1.4 and f1.2 lenses for night time photography and there are also limits to the usefulness of shallow depth of field in those circumstances.

I myself have often enjoyed the opportunity of loaning a tripod locally. This is a much better option than bringing your own.

fillkay

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Re: European travel?
« Reply #20 on: April 04, 2013, 05:28:20 AM »
Two tips for Prague: go to the cafe terrace on the top floor of 'U Prince' hotel near to the astronomical clock to get a great view of the old town square, especially at night; and to the south along the river there's the really interesting 'dancing house' (Tančící dům), designed by Frank Gehry. Be on the lookout for Art Nouveau and Art Deco details in buildings.

Although it was a few years since I was there, there was also a number of second hand photo shops with some interesting vintage kit to drool over.

Do beware of what happened to me in Slovakia: my one and only standard 17-85 lens went on the blink, and I wasn't able to get any kind of replacement so ended up having to use a point and shoot for standard shots. I wish I'd taken some alternative.

serendipidy

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Re: European travel?
« Reply #21 on: April 04, 2013, 06:25:14 AM »
Many great suggestions above. Might also consider Rothenburg ob der Tauber, west of Munich, if you have the time. It is one of the best preserved medieval walled cities in Europe. In Paris, might also consider a trip to the Palace of Versailles. Market streets of Rue Montorgueill, Rue Mouffetard, or Rue Cler make for some interesting street scenes. I think there might be a recent French law about taking peoples photos in public. Last year, there were some people in Paris and Nice giving me nasty looks as I took some street scene shots. I was traveling very light and only took a pocket Canon SX230. I got some very nice photos but a DSLR would have had much better IQ. Have a great trip and post some of your results. :)
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Deva

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Re: European travel?
« Reply #22 on: April 15, 2013, 11:45:20 AM »
Forgot to mention - you might also consider the Pompidou centre in Paris. Unless you're into modern art (it is the largest museum for modern art in Europe), it's probably not worth going inside, but the building itself was ground-breaking when it was first constructed (with all its insides on the outside, as it were), is a magnet for street performers, and there are some very unusual sculptures in the Stravinsky Fountain nearby.

Deva

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Re: European travel?
« Reply #23 on: April 18, 2013, 04:44:38 AM »
@Deva:
I generally agree with your comment regarding tripods, but for night time photography a tripod may come in quite handy, especially if used extensively for night time exposures.

If there is no opportunity for night time photography, then a tripod would indeed be a waste of space and effort, but things look differently, if there are lots of opportunities. Not everyone will bring in a 1D-X and f1.4 and f1.2 lenses for night time photography and there are also limits to the usefulness of shallow depth of field in those circumstances.

I myself have often enjoyed the opportunity of loaning a tripod locally. This is a much better option than bringing your own.

You may enjoy reading Ken Rockwell's view on the need (or not) for tripods with modern digital cameras: www.kenrockwell.com/tech/digital-killed-my-tripod.htm