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Author Topic: Computer Upgrade for new camera  (Read 12633 times)

Harry Muff

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Re: Computer Upgrade for new camera
« Reply #15 on: May 31, 2013, 03:26:39 PM »
Sorry about that. I only read the first post thoroughly, then I just randomly scrolled and have read somewherer about iMaca and love getting something something, so I just concluded you're getting one. Anyway. Get a SSD (your computer will be reborn, I promise you that) and 4GB RAM (more, if it fits in your laptop). Lightroom 4 has this stupid bug, which won't flush memory. After editing about 20-25 pictures, all my RAM is used up and even if I restart Lightroom, it won't help much, other than restarting whole computer.


Have a look on the App Store for free Memory Flushers. They work a treat.
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Re: Computer Upgrade for new camera
« Reply #15 on: May 31, 2013, 03:26:39 PM »

whothafunk

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Re: Computer Upgrade for new camera
« Reply #16 on: June 01, 2013, 07:06:23 AM »
Will check it out, thanks.

And any Mac thats 4,2 (new unibody) and newer runs 10.8. Mine is 4,1 and it won't run.
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Rocguy

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Re: Computer Upgrade for new camera
« Reply #17 on: June 01, 2013, 10:13:39 AM »
Lightroom free with a 6D? I didn't get that....  :o

I've been meaning to check it out since it apparently easily does lens corrections and Aperture does not do them at all. Otherwise Aperture is great.

And get as much ram as you can afford really. I'm running a 2010 iMac with 8GB of ram. And it gets annoyingly slow at times. I just would rather put the money in upgrading this into a new machine at this point or I'd double that for sure.


RadioPath

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Re: Computer Upgrade for new camera
« Reply #18 on: June 01, 2013, 05:37:33 PM »
Max out the RAM. It'll probably take 16Gb. That'll make a difference.


An SSD will speed up anything to do with the system, such as start up and app launching. Don't expect it to make much difference when actually using PS or LR though, apart from saving.


After taking out the HDD you've got, look into taking out the DVD drive and install the HDD using a bay adapter off eBay in place of it.


That way you don't have to get a massive SSD; you can use it to run the OS and apps only.


Regarding OS X, I recommend taking it up to Lion (10.7) at least. It uses up less space and runs faster. It has some features you might like too. I'm not sure if a 2009 MBP will run 10.8.


Also look into which of the Apple apps you actually need. I've deleted iPhoto, iMovie, Photo Booth, etc. There's a good few gig to be freed up doing that.




Maintenance is important to speed too. Onyx (free) is an essential tool for keep OS X in shape and CleanMyMac (money) is good for cleaning out unwanted crap as well.

I have a Mac Pro, not a MBP, so I had the slots available. Already bought and installed the SSD and the 2 HDs, waiting for my ML DVD to arrive, so I can update to SL.

I'll look into upgrading RAM as well, I found an upgrade to 12 GB for 150 €, 24 GB for 200€. 16 GB is not such a good option for this Mac Pro, b/c one should only fill slots 1 - 3, otherwise it slows down the bus or sth. like that. Will have to wait a bit, though, my gadget budget is pretty much empty now.

I'll check out Onyx, never heard of it so far.

Lightroom free with a 6D? I didn't get that....  :o

I've been meaning to check it out since it apparently easily does lens corrections and Aperture does not do them at all. Otherwise Aperture is great.

And get as much ram as you can afford really. I'm running a 2010 iMac with 8GB of ram. And it gets annoyingly slow at times. I just would rather put the money in upgrading this into a new machine at this point or I'd double that for sure.



Did you buy it recently in Germany? Canon support told me, that they give it anyone who bought it after April 22nd, just drop them a line. Maybe they also have it in other countries, just check out canon.(de, fr, cn,...).

You also feel that more RAM is needed I see. Well, 6 GB is apparently not as much, as when I bought the machine.

Thanks everyone!
RadioPath


Mt Spokane Photography

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Re: Computer Upgrade for new camera
« Reply #19 on: June 01, 2013, 07:04:06 PM »
Hi everyone,

thanks again for all the good advice before, wanted to hear your take on how/whether to upgrade my current computer:

I have a 2009 MacPro w/ 500 GB HD and 6d GB of RAM and an ATI Radeon 4870, currently still running OS X 10.5. Served me well enough for my work stuff and for fun, such as cataloging and minor adjustments on the JPG's from my 400D. Have been itching to upgrade anyways, mostly because I need more HD space and speed. I hope I'll manage to go to the store tonight to buy a 6D and thought to also take some stuff for my Computer, especially since I have to update my system to run LR included with the 6D and to be able to work on those larger Raw Files.

My thoughts re upgrade were:
250 GB Samsung 840 SSD for system and programs
2 x 2TB WD Black series HD, one for general files, music, and iPhoto, the other for working on photos and the occasional video. The latter would include the LR library.

The old HD would remain as a backup system, as I have some files programs, that I don't want to risk loosing. Would basically start a fresh system and copy over my files to HD #1.

1. Should that be fast enough? Or do I NEED more RAM or sth. else for it to runs smoothely (new computer is not an option at this point)?

2. Should I partition the HD's in a certain way. I'd rather not, as I like the flexibility of big HDs, but would do so if there was a significant speed increase.

3. The way I understand it, the LR library is not synched into the system, the way iPhoto is, so I thought I'd just export jpgs after PP straight into iPhoto. Is that easy/convenient or is there another way? The added benefit would be, that I'd have at least 1 level of backup. Also, my wife likes iPhoto :)

4. Which system should I update to? I like 10.8 on my MBA, but how well would it run on my old machine? Better to go 10.6 and not use the additional features (which I like very much, though)?

5. Is this all worth it or will my computer be too slow anyways? It runs other Software (e.g. OsiriX) well enough.

6. I was gonna use LR since I'll get it for free. If there is other software that needs less hardware, might be cost efficient to buy that instead...

Thanks in advance!
RadioPath

Avoid the Samsung 250GB 840 SSD.  Go for the PRO versions if you can.
 
Samsung used two types of memory in the 840 series,  The Pro versions are much preferred for a few dollars more.
 
"When we finally got the specifications for the SSD 840, I understood why Samsung was reluctant to share too many details about the drive before its launch: the Samsung SSD 840 is the first consumer SSD to utilize 3-bit-per-cell MLC NAND (aka TLC). "
 
http://www.anandtech.com/show/6337/samsung-ssd-840-250gb-review
 
Another option is the Crucial 960 GB SSD Drive.  Its not a speed demon like the Samsung 840 Pro, but it is fast, large, and low cost.  It uses MLC, and not TLC DRAM.
 
http://www.anandtech.com/show/6884/crucial-micron-m500-review-960gb-480gb-240gb-120gb
 
 

RadioPath

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Re: Computer Upgrade for new camera
« Reply #20 on: June 01, 2013, 07:17:43 PM »
Hi everyone,

thanks again for all the good advice before, wanted to hear your take on how/whether to upgrade my current computer:

I have a 2009 MacPro w/ 500 GB HD and 6d GB of RAM and an ATI Radeon 4870, currently still running OS X 10.5. Served me well enough for my work stuff and for fun, such as cataloging and minor adjustments on the JPG's from my 400D. Have been itching to upgrade anyways, mostly because I need more HD space and speed. I hope I'll manage to go to the store tonight to buy a 6D and thought to also take some stuff for my Computer, especially since I have to update my system to run LR included with the 6D and to be able to work on those larger Raw Files.

My thoughts re upgrade were:
250 GB Samsung 840 SSD for system and programs
2 x 2TB WD Black series HD, one for general files, music, and iPhoto, the other for working on photos and the occasional video. The latter would include the LR library.

The old HD would remain as a backup system, as I have some files programs, that I don't want to risk loosing. Would basically start a fresh system and copy over my files to HD #1.

1. Should that be fast enough? Or do I NEED more RAM or sth. else for it to runs smoothely (new computer is not an option at this point)?

2. Should I partition the HD's in a certain way. I'd rather not, as I like the flexibility of big HDs, but would do so if there was a significant speed increase.

3. The way I understand it, the LR library is not synched into the system, the way iPhoto is, so I thought I'd just export jpgs after PP straight into iPhoto. Is that easy/convenient or is there another way? The added benefit would be, that I'd have at least 1 level of backup. Also, my wife likes iPhoto :)

4. Which system should I update to? I like 10.8 on my MBA, but how well would it run on my old machine? Better to go 10.6 and not use the additional features (which I like very much, though)?

5. Is this all worth it or will my computer be too slow anyways? It runs other Software (e.g. OsiriX) well enough.

6. I was gonna use LR since I'll get it for free. If there is other software that needs less hardware, might be cost efficient to buy that instead...

Thanks in advance!
RadioPath

Avoid the Samsung 250GB 840 SSD.  Go for the PRO versions if you can.
 
Samsung used two types of memory in the 840 series,  The Pro versions are much preferred for a few dollars more.
 
"When we finally got the specifications for the SSD 840, I understood why Samsung was reluctant to share too many details about the drive before its launch: the Samsung SSD 840 is the first consumer SSD to utilize 3-bit-per-cell MLC NAND (aka TLC). "
 
http://www.anandtech.com/show/6337/samsung-ssd-840-250gb-review
 
Another option is the Crucial 960 GB SSD Drive.  Its not a speed demon like the Samsung 840 Pro, but it is fast, large, and low cost.  It uses MLC, and not TLC DRAM.
 
http://www.anandtech.com/show/6884/crucial-micron-m500-review-960gb-480gb-240gb-120gb

Thanks for the advice, too late though, already bought and built in.... OTOH the price difference here would have ben 150 vs. 210 € and that review you posted the life span given is 7 years; could live with that, I'm sure by that time I would buy a new computer with a bigger SSD. One probably shouldn't go for the Fusion drive with the non-pro version, as the drive could fail earlier. When all the important data is on a different drive anyway, the worst that could happen would be to buy a new SSD, install it in the computer, install the software (maybe just through Time Machine? Not using that, yet), done.

Mt Spokane Photography

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Re: Computer Upgrade for new camera
« Reply #21 on: June 01, 2013, 09:58:47 PM »


Thanks for the advice, too late though, already bought and built in.... OTOH the price difference here would have ben 150 vs. 210 € and that review you posted the life span given is 7 years; could live with that, I'm sure by that time I would buy a new computer with a bigger SSD. One probably shouldn't go for the Fusion drive with the non-pro version, as the drive could fail earlier. When all the important data is on a different drive anyway, the worst that could happen would be to buy a new SSD, install it in the computer, install the software (maybe just through Time Machine? Not using that, yet), done.

 
I'm sure you will like it,  Its more a matter of being much slower than the 830.
 
I had a 256 GB 830 and When I bought a new PC, I was going to add a 840, but noticed the specs had it slower than my 830.  I found what was happening from the review and bought a 840 Pro instead.  I also doubt if life is a issue.

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Re: Computer Upgrade for new camera
« Reply #21 on: June 01, 2013, 09:58:47 PM »

RadioPath

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Re: Computer Upgrade for new camera
« Reply #22 on: June 02, 2013, 04:18:41 AM »

I'm sure you will like it,  Its more a matter of being much slower than the 830.
 
I had a 256 GB 830 and When I bought a new PC, I was going to add a 840, but noticed the specs had it slower than my 830.  I found what was happening from the review and bought a 840 Pro instead.  I also doubt if life is a issue.

The guy in the store actually also said, that the 830 would have been better for my computer, especially since the old Mac Pro does not support SATA 3. They just don't sell it anymore, so the 840 would be next best thing. The SATA might be a bottle neck anyways. Let's see, it should be faster than what I have now and psychologically that will make it good :)

iKenndac

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Re: Computer Upgrade for new camera
« Reply #23 on: June 02, 2013, 06:55:42 AM »
Sorry about that. I only read the first post thoroughly, then I just randomly scrolled and have read somewherer about iMaca and love getting something something, so I just concluded you're getting one. Anyway. Get a SSD (your computer will be reborn, I promise you that) and 4GB RAM (more, if it fits in your laptop). Lightroom 4 has this stupid bug, which won't flush memory. After editing about 20-25 pictures, all my RAM is used up and even if I restart Lightroom, it won't help much, other than restarting whole computer.


Have a look on the App Store for free Memory Flushers. They work a treat.

I hate to be that guy, but: No. No no no no no.

Memory flushers are often detrimental to overall system performance. Here's why: Unused RAM is wasted RAM. It's money better spent on something else. Therefore, when you quit an application or an application frees/flushes memory, Mac OS X won't actually free it. Instead, the system keeps the data in RAM around in case it's needed again later. For example, if you reboot your Mac and launch Photoshop, it'll take quite a long time to launch. If you quit Photoshop and launch it again a second time, it'll load *much* faster. This is because the system kept the data around in RAM so it didn't have to load Photoshop from disk the second time.

This cached information is freed from RAM automatically if something else needs it. Using "RAM flushers" deletes this cache, meaning you lose the performance benefits it provides.

You can read more about this from Apple themselves here (under the "Inactive" header).

Basically, if you have more than 0Mb of free RAM on a Mac OS X machine at the end of the work day, that RAM was a waste of money and you should've spent it on something else.

Source: I'm a programmer by trade — it'd my job to know this boring crap like the back of my hand.

Edit: Sorry, forgot the useful part of this post: The simple way to tell if your computer needs more RAM is to look at the "Page Outs" figure in Activity Monitor. Page Outs happen when the system has run out of RAM to store everything it needs, so it starts purging stuff out to disk. Doing that is super slow (even with SSDs) and you should avoid it if you can. For example, my Mac has 16Gb of RAM and its uptime is nearly 80 days (I just sleep it rather than shutting it down). In this time, page outs total around 200Mb, which is perfectly fine. My free memory figure is never more than 1Gb or so, and all my apps load super fast because they're in the cache. However, because the page outs figure is so low, adding more RAM won't really increase performance.
« Last Edit: June 02, 2013, 07:02:52 AM by iKenndac »

RadioPath

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Re: Computer Upgrade for new camera
« Reply #24 on: June 02, 2013, 07:41:54 AM »
Sorry about that. I only read the first post thoroughly, then I just randomly scrolled and have read somewherer about iMaca and love getting something something, so I just concluded you're getting one. Anyway. Get a SSD (your computer will be reborn, I promise you that) and 4GB RAM (more, if it fits in your laptop). Lightroom 4 has this stupid bug, which won't flush memory. After editing about 20-25 pictures, all my RAM is used up and even if I restart Lightroom, it won't help much, other than restarting whole computer.


Have a look on the App Store for free Memory Flushers. They work a treat.

I hate to be that guy, but: No. No no no no no.

Memory flushers are often detrimental to overall system performance. Here's why: Unused RAM is wasted RAM. It's money better spent on something else. Therefore, when you quit an application or an application frees/flushes memory, Mac OS X won't actually free it. Instead, the system keeps the data in RAM around in case it's needed again later. For example, if you reboot your Mac and launch Photoshop, it'll take quite a long time to launch. If you quit Photoshop and launch it again a second time, it'll load *much* faster. This is because the system kept the data around in RAM so it didn't have to load Photoshop from disk the second time.

This cached information is freed from RAM automatically if something else needs it. Using "RAM flushers" deletes this cache, meaning you lose the performance benefits it provides.

You can read more about this from Apple themselves here (under the "Inactive" header).

Basically, if you have more than 0Mb of free RAM on a Mac OS X machine at the end of the work day, that RAM was a waste of money and you should've spent it on something else.

Source: I'm a programmer by trade — it'd my job to know this boring crap like the back of my hand.

Edit: Sorry, forgot the useful part of this post: The simple way to tell if your computer needs more RAM is to look at the "Page Outs" figure in Activity Monitor. Page Outs happen when the system has run out of RAM to store everything it needs, so it starts purging stuff out to disk. Doing that is super slow (even with SSDs) and you should avoid it if you can. For example, my Mac has 16Gb of RAM and its uptime is nearly 80 days (I just sleep it rather than shutting it down). In this time, page outs total around 200Mb, which is perfectly fine. My free memory figure is never more than 1Gb or so, and all my apps load super fast because they're in the cache. However, because the page outs figure is so low, adding more RAM won't really increase performance.

Wow, that page out thing is a good tip. I'll just see what it says to evaluate wether I need more ram. What would be an acceptable amount?

whothafunk

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Re: Computer Upgrade for new camera
« Reply #25 on: June 03, 2013, 12:51:18 PM »
Have a look on the App Store for free Memory Flushers. They work a treat.
Memory flushers are often detrimental to overall system performance. Here's why: Unused RAM is wasted RAM. It's money better spent on something else. Therefore, when you quit an application or an application frees/flushes memory, Mac OS X won't actually free it. Instead, the system keeps the data in RAM around in case it's needed again later. For example, if you reboot your Mac and launch Photoshop, it'll take quite a long time to launch. If you quit Photoshop and launch it again a second time, it'll load *much* faster. This is because the system kept the data around in RAM so it didn't have to load Photoshop from disk the second time.
i'm aware of that. however if i use LR4 when editing RAWS, then quit it, activity monitor's icon (rainbow pie) is mostly blue, meaning "inactive" memory. what good does inactive memory do me if i only have 400mb free afterwards and once i open a couple of tabs on google chrome and another program, that blue (inactive memory) stays the same, taking up 60% or more of RAM for nothing. with SSD, PS5 f.e. opens in 4 seconds the first time i start it, and takes about 2-3s when i launch the second time, so i really dont care about that 1 second if it means that ill have free memory.
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Harry Muff

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Re: Computer Upgrade for new camera
« Reply #26 on: June 04, 2013, 06:07:26 AM »
Exactly. If you're worried about load up times, get an SSD. I'd rather keep my RAM freed up.
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andres5d3

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Re: Computer Upgrade for new camera
« Reply #27 on: June 04, 2013, 11:15:01 AM »
but RAM is so cheap these days 8GB for $40?

i know my system had 16GB of RAM on Windows 7, when stitching photos from LR to CS5.5, the most I used was 13 out of 16GB of RAM, never had thought of an SSD back then and probably will not; i just max out on what the motherboard can take
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Re: Computer Upgrade for new camera
« Reply #27 on: June 04, 2013, 11:15:01 AM »