November 23, 2014, 05:41:29 PM

Author Topic: Canon brand UV and Circ. Polarizing filters  (Read 3443 times)

mpphoto

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Re: Canon brand UV and Circ. Polarizing filters
« Reply #30 on: August 28, 2014, 09:37:31 PM »
I had an issue with a UV filter and a circular polarizing filter at a car show this weekend.  I was using the 24-105mm L on a 5D Mk III, with a B+W F-Pro UV filter on it.  A car I wanted to photograph had some distracting reflections on it, so I put a Hoya PL-CIR filter onto the UV filter.  The polarizing filter was stuck when I went to take it off.  I tried several times to get it off, but it wouldn't budge.  I ended up shooting the rest of the car show with the polarizing filter on, which was inconvenient because of the loss of light and there was vignetting when zoomed wider than about 35mm.  With 20/20 hindsight, I should have taken both filters off and crossed my fingers that the lens hood would provide enough protection from the crowds at the car show.

Attached is what the view was like at 24mm with both the B+W F-Pro and the Hoya PL-CIR on.  I had to remember not to go wider than 35mm.  I was able to get the filters apart later with a filter wrench.

I'm not sure what caused the Hoya to get stuck so badly.  Was it the filter's aluminum frame?  Was it the high humidity?  This was my first time stacking filters since I started using a full-frame body, and now I know how easy it is to cause vignetting.  I just measured the Hoya, and it appears to be 1cm/10mm thick.  Considering how rarely I use CPL filters, I thought I would save money and go with Hoya even though all my other filters are B+W.  Looks like that may have been a poor decision.  The thin B+W polarizing filters are expensive, but I may end up getting a 77mm since it is the size I use most.
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Re: Canon brand UV and Circ. Polarizing filters
« Reply #30 on: August 28, 2014, 09:37:31 PM »

neuroanatomist

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Re: Canon brand UV and Circ. Polarizing filters
« Reply #31 on: August 28, 2014, 09:58:05 PM »
I'm not sure what caused the Hoya to get stuck so badly.  Was it the filter's aluminum frame? 

The thin B+W polarizing filters are expensive, but I may end up getting a 77mm since it is the size I use most.

Always better to take off the UV before putting on the CPL.  Only stack for effect (e.g. CPL + ND).

Aluminum tends to get stuck more frequently, it expands/contracts more than brass with temperature changes.

Even the brass rings can get stuck.  Filter wrenches are ~$5 per set, I bought a several sets and keep them in a few camera bags.

The B+W XS-Pro CPL is 4mm thick. 
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mackguyver

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Re: Canon brand UV and Circ. Polarizing filters
« Reply #32 on: August 29, 2014, 09:24:23 AM »
I can't find a lot of information online about these so far.  I'm looking to get 2 77mm UV filters to protect my lenses and one circular polarizer.

The Canon brand filters are more expensive than the other filters I see in my catalogs.

Are they worth it?

No.

I had to buy a Canon CPL once and it was the biggest POS I ever got, it delaminated in a matter of weeks and scratched very easily. Do not buy them.
Pretty sad that Canon makes such garbage considering what great optics they make.  Maybe they should come out with an "L" line of filters ;)

I don't think Canon do make them, they might be made for them, but not by them.
That certainly appears to the case and you would think they would care more about there brand...

Mitch.Conner

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Re: Canon brand UV and Circ. Polarizing filters
« Reply #33 on: September 03, 2014, 11:03:33 AM »
What is the difference between the various types of filters offered by B+W?  The XS-Pro vs the F-Pro.. etc.  I don't see on the Schneider Optics page a comparison of the details of each.  I found a thread online that claimed the F-Pro was made of brass whereas the XS-Pro wasn't, but according to Amazon et. al. the XS-Pro is indeed made of brass.

I ask because between this thread, and this thread, I've gotten recommendations to go down the B+W route for filters.  I'm just confused though between their F-Pro, and XS-Pro filters, and any other types.  Did I miss on the Schneider Optics site where they explain the differences?

I've learned through these two threads that I should pass on UV filters and just get coated clear filters for protection.  I'll also be getting a polarizer that I can use hopefully on both the 24-105 and the 70-200 given that they both take 77mm.  I'm unsure though if that will work since the 24-105 goes down below 35mm and I've heard that below 35mm FL, you need a thin polarizer (or alternatively you shouldn't use one at all).

Any help will be appreciated.  I'm going to post this on the other thread too since I've inadvertently scattered my questions across 2 threads.


Get these:
B+W 77mm XS-Pro Clear MRC-Nano 007 Filter
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/756818-REG/B_W_66_1066111_77mm_XS_Pro_NANO_Clear.html

B+W 77mm Kaesemann XS-Pro Circular Polarizer MRC Nano Filter
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/752975-REG/B_W_1066400_77mm_XS_Pro_Digital_MC.html

XS-Pro = Slim filter with added threads for lens cap/addt'l filters, less light falloff with some lenses than a thick filter
Clear = Neutral, exactly what you want from a protective filter (unlike UV, which can affect color balance adversely)
MRC = Multicoated, better scratch protection and flare resistance than cheaper single coated filters
Nano = Coating that makes filter much easier to clean (almost like Rain-X, water/debris comes right off instead of requiring polishing)
The B+W filters also are made of brass, which binds less than cheaper aluminum filters.

Yes, the initial investment is significantly higher than a cheap filter.  But these filters will last longer, be easier to work with, and have less adverse impact on image quality compared to cheaper filters.

I didn't see your post until now, but that's what I got.

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Re: Canon brand UV and Circ. Polarizing filters
« Reply #33 on: September 03, 2014, 11:03:33 AM »