October 20, 2014, 08:00:49 AM

Author Topic: Canon to withdraw from the low-priced compact digital camera  (Read 7565 times)

scyrene

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Re: Canon to withdraw from the low-priced compact digital camera
« Reply #30 on: September 10, 2014, 04:42:25 PM »
Smart phones are taking over because people can't be bothered.

My wife is an iPhoneographer (which drives me up the wall) but if she's in the shot, she wants a high-end P&S or DSLR used because she KNOWS what they look like on the computer.

2 more years your toaster will probably have a camera in it.

Just so you know, I had to google that . . . just to be sure someone didn't have a kickstarter for that already. >:(
What a great idea! A toaster with a camera! It could tell how well toasted the bread is!

That's what transparent toasters are for! http://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B004H62AQA

:D

And call me an old cynic, but most images don't warrant more than a glance. The higher up the scale you go, the more (some photographers at least) feel the need to add a load of narrative to justify banality. Most photos, for most people (I observe) are valuable primarily in their subject matter. Which is fine. Banality is fine too. Just don't pretend it's actually profundity.
5D mark III, 50D, 300D, EOS-M; Samyang 14mm f/2.8, 24-105L, MP-E, 85L II, 100L macro, 500L IS II, EF-M 18-55; 1.4xIII, 2x III + 2xII extenders; 600EX-RT; EF-M--EF adaptor.
Former lenses include: 70-200L f/4 non-IS, 200L 2.8, 400L 5.6

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Re: Canon to withdraw from the low-priced compact digital camera
« Reply #30 on: September 10, 2014, 04:42:25 PM »

unfocused

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Re: Canon to withdraw from the low-priced compact digital camera
« Reply #31 on: September 10, 2014, 05:19:20 PM »
I would actually argue that besides competition from phones a lot of the reason why the compact market was in trouble was because competition had driven prices for basic compacts so low that profit margins were limited even if sales were high. You look back 15 years and pretty basic compacts by todays standards were selling for $400+.

The big mistake that I think was made in the compact market that left it open to phones was IMHO sticking to relatively small sensors for too long, even high end compacts were stuck with 1/1.7' sensors for god knows how many years. Sticking with smaller sensors did mean that zoom ranges could increase but I'd argue that for the majority a 24-100mmish range is really all they need. Increasing sensor size sooner would have gotten more people used to higher quality phones would struggle to equal.

The future is I'd guess a move towards larger sensored more expensive compacts but I think its now much more of an uphill struggle as your having to user users back.

I don't really think so. Everyone carries a phone with them at all times. So, the convenience of having a phone that takes pictures was just too great for camera manufacturers to compete with.

The small sensors of compacts are frankly quite impressive, so I don't think most people using a phone as a camera would have changed their habits for a larger sensor (and a larger body) camera.

Finally, the nail in the coffin has been social media and wifi. Camera manufacturers were slow to adapt to the realities of wireless posting and still don't have the most intuitive designs. The slow adoption of touchscreen and the difficulty of typing on a camera haven't helped either.

Neuro might make fun of the Facebook button on the Canon, but frankly that's what a lot of people want and expect -- the ability to upload an image to their Facebook page with a single button.

All manufacturers, including Canon, have been embarrassingly slow in adapting to the new realities. People whine about esoteric issues like dynamic range, but here we are in 2014 and it sounds like the 7DII won't even have an integrated touch screen and wifi, much less an interface that allows users to access Photoshop's new Ipad app from their cameras, do some quick edits and post pictures straight from the camera.
pictures sharp. life not so much. www.unfocusedmg.com

Diko

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Re: Canon to withdraw from the low-priced compact digital camera
« Reply #32 on: September 10, 2014, 05:32:50 PM »
I would actually argue that besides competition from phones a lot of the reason why the compact market was in trouble was because competition had driven prices for basic compacts so low that profit margins were limited even if sales were high. You look back 15 years and pretty basic compacts by todays standards were selling for $400+.
...
The future is I'd guess a move towards larger sensored more expensive compacts but I think its now much more of an uphill struggle as your having to user users back.

I don't really think so. Everyone carries a phone with them at all times. So, the convenience of having a phone that takes pictures was just too great for camera manufacturers to compete with.

The small sensors of compacts are frankly quite impressive, so I don't think most people using a phone as a camera would have changed their habits for a larger sensor (and a larger body) camera.
...
All manufacturers, including Canon, have been embarrassingly slow in adapting to the new realities. People whine about esoteric issues like dynamic range, but here we are in 2014 and it sounds like the 7DII won't even have an integrated touch screen and wifi, much less an interface that allows users to access Photoshop's new Ipad app from their cameras, do some quick edits and post pictures straight from the camera.
The trend for bigger sensor is obvious already. And bigger sensor on MILC is not such a bad idea. That means NOT that big bodies at all.

The talk of a SONY powered (who else...!?!) CMOS MILC is already circulating the internet. And I'll be damned if I don't buy one of those one day when the technology is enough mature so devices are not slow as an old lady while the prices are as high as a NBA MVP.

The point is that the death of DSLR is inevitable in 10 years at most. That time is needed for tech to get smaller (e.g. autofocus mechanism), better (EVF with wider DR), and new concepts like DPAF to be invented. In 10 years MILC will come as a winner.

Give it 20 at most if the big players decide to get out every $ possible out of the MF DSLR class. You know first there will be 1.6 crop MF... then a true MF will appear. Someone even may dare to get  7x7 DSLR... but that aside from fashion don't see a true application anywhere else.... at all.

So what do you think of my daredreaming?

AcutancePhotography

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Re: Canon to withdraw from the low-priced compact digital camera
« Reply #33 on: September 11, 2014, 08:16:31 AM »
ROFL. I have no idea who writes those.... but the news there are brilliant!

NewCameraNews is the only legitimate photography news website. They are not afraid to tell the real truth.  ;D
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moreorless

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Re: Canon to withdraw from the low-priced compact digital camera
« Reply #34 on: September 11, 2014, 11:46:26 AM »
I would actually argue that besides competition from phones a lot of the reason why the compact market was in trouble was because competition had driven prices for basic compacts so low that profit margins were limited even if sales were high. You look back 15 years and pretty basic compacts by todays standards were selling for $400+.

The big mistake that I think was made in the compact market that left it open to phones was IMHO sticking to relatively small sensors for too long, even high end compacts were stuck with 1/1.7' sensors for god knows how many years. Sticking with smaller sensors did mean that zoom ranges could increase but I'd argue that for the majority a 24-100mmish range is really all they need. Increasing sensor size sooner would have gotten more people used to higher quality phones would struggle to equal.

The future is I'd guess a move towards larger sensored more expensive compacts but I think its now much more of an uphill struggle as your having to user users back.

I don't really think so. Everyone carries a phone with them at all times. So, the convenience of having a phone that takes pictures was just too great for camera manufacturers to compete with.

The small sensors of compacts are frankly quite impressive, so I don't think most people using a phone as a camera would have changed their habits for a larger sensor (and a larger body) camera.

Finally, the nail in the coffin has been social media and wifi. Camera manufacturers were slow to adapt to the realities of wireless posting and still don't have the most intuitive designs. The slow adoption of touchscreen and the difficulty of typing on a camera haven't helped either.

Neuro might make fun of the Facebook button on the Canon, but frankly that's what a lot of people want and expect -- the ability to upload an image to their Facebook page with a single button.

All manufacturers, including Canon, have been embarrassingly slow in adapting to the new realities. People whine about esoteric issues like dynamic range, but here we are in 2014 and it sounds like the 7DII won't even have an integrated touch screen and wifi, much less an interface that allows users to access Photoshop's new Ipad app from their cameras, do some quick edits and post pictures straight from the camera.

I'd agree that a lot of the market loss to phones was inevitable but I think that loss was made worse by sticking to smaller sensors for so long. Greater connectivity maybe a plus but is still always going to be playing catchup to phones, larger sensors earlier could have gotten people used to greater quality.

Your talking vastly different markets between than powershot at the 7D mk2, I don't think connectivity is a massive issue with the latter.

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Re: Canon to withdraw from the low-priced compact digital camera
« Reply #34 on: September 11, 2014, 11:46:26 AM »