EOS R: Quirks and Quibbles

YuengLinger

EOS 5D MK IV
Dec 20, 2012
2,576
679
Southeastern USA
Couple from the past few days.

One is a basic ergonomics factor. On most of the Canon dSLR's, on the front of the body, between the viewfinder "hump" and the right grip with the shutter button, there is a ridge that makes putting the camera down secure and easy. The EOS R is just smooth and flush between the viewfinder and the grip, meaning my index finger doesn't have that ridge for a positive grip when putting the camera down in, say, the center console of my truck...or really any other surface with one hand. This matters most with a heavy lens attached.

I really hope the next R gets that ridge back.

Another quirk, that some might call a quibble, is the AF point types. I "discovered" by accident yesterday that they are all horizontal AF point types--no verticals, no cross-types. (I was, believe it or not, taking photos of some window blinds with cool light and shadow patterns.) Canon addresses this here:


We also learn from the linked article that Nikon went the same way with AF point-types, just using less for some reason. Clearly not a firmware issue.

I'm working around it just as the article suggests, by slightly tilting the camera to one side or the other for a moment to lock focus. And I've already posted elsewhere that for portraiture, the R's AF system is the best I've ever used.

This does, however, explain some frustrating moments in the past week where the camera just hunted (landscapes and still lifes).

Finally, and this is a quibble that might really be a quirk, already discussed a bit here on CR: The IS stays on. But I think I can go a step further and say it is staying on EVEN WHEN THE LENS'S IS SWITCH IS OFF! I say this because I can hear it if I place my ear against the barrel. (I found some suggestions somewhere on the web that the IS disengages with the switch off, but the unit remains energized. Could this just be to have it ready? To protect it from bumps when the camera is in use without IS on?)

It would be very interesting to hear Canon's explanation!
 

YuengLinger

EOS 5D MK IV
Dec 20, 2012
2,576
679
Southeastern USA
Nearly a month into using the R. I've been using it pretty much every day, to the point where muscle memory is now causing a problem when I pick up my 5D IV!

Yes, this is a quibble. It is so much a Canon, but so different from other Canons that it gets confusing.

And the real issue I'm posting about is the EVF wanting to come on when the camera is hanging by a strap and the EVF sensor is activated by my shirt. I tried some combinations of settings to avoid this and finally hit on having the Display set to Manual, and using the top LCD light button to switch back and forth between EVF and back display. This means that the EVF doesn't come on automatically unless I switch to it before shooting. This really works to keep the displays from popping on at odd times, BUT my oh my! It is so hard to get used to switching before I bring the camera to my eye to shoot.

I can't stand reviewing images through the EVF (even though they look good) because I feel so dumb (and kind of vulnerable, to be frank) in public standing there with my camera to my eye but not focusing on anything in the real world. Plus of course I'm completely missing whatever is going on around me. So I switch to back display to review or make settings changes, then forget to switch back, then I miss a freakin' shot because I didn't activate the EVF quicker.

Has anybody else figured out a better way???
 

Memdroid

EOS 80D
Nov 12, 2013
114
24
Nearly a month into using the R. I've been using it pretty much every day, to the point where muscle memory is now causing a problem when I pick up my 5D IV!

Yes, this is a quibble. It is so much a Canon, but so different from other Canons that it gets confusing.

And the real issue I'm posting about is the EVF wanting to come on when the camera is hanging by a strap and the EVF sensor is activated by my shirt. I tried some combinations of settings to avoid this and finally hit on having the Display set to Manual, and using the top LCD light button to switch back and forth between EVF and back display. This means that the EVF doesn't come on automatically unless I switch to it before shooting. This really works to keep the displays from popping on at odd times, BUT my oh my! It is so hard to get used to switching before I bring the camera to my eye to shoot.

I can't stand reviewing images through the EVF (even though they look good) because I feel so dumb (and kind of vulnerable, to be frank) in public standing there with my camera to my eye but not focusing on anything in the real world. Plus of course I'm completely missing whatever is going on around me. So I switch to back display to review or make settings changes, then forget to switch back, then I miss a freakin' shot because I didn't activate the EVF quicker.

Has anybody else figured out a better way???
So recognizable. This is on the of ergonomic instances that annoys me. I would have loved it more if Canon had kept the Start/Stop button to activate/deactivate liveview display so that it behaves like the 5D and 1DX instead of giving us the touchbar nonsense.
 

Viggo

EOS 5D SR
Dec 13, 2010
4,212
773
Yeah, I don’t have that issue, I’ve set my camera to ECO/sleep asap, so my camera goes into standby within a few seconds of not being used, and the EVF sensor also does that. So instead of switching screen/EVF to my eye, I simply grab the camera and simultaneously halfpress the shutter. The camera wakes up on the way to my eye, and turns all the way off when I put it down.
 

koenkooi

EOS 7D MK II
Feb 25, 2015
482
283
I can't stand reviewing images through the EVF (even though they look good) because I feel so dumb (and kind of vulnerable, to be frank) in public standing there with my camera to my eye but not focusing on anything in the real world. Plus of course I'm completely missing whatever is going on around me. So I switch to back display to review or make settings changes, then forget to switch back, then I miss a freakin' shot because I didn't activate the EVF quicker.

Has anybody else figured out a better way???
There's one case where I prefer to review in the EVF and that's for macro pictures. On my RP I feel I can see the details better in the EVF with 1:1 zoom. But most of my macro pictures are taken in my back yard, so it's not in public :)
 
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YuengLinger

EOS 5D MK IV
Dec 20, 2012
2,576
679
Southeastern USA
Yeah, I don’t have that issue, I’ve set my camera to ECO/sleep asap, so my camera goes into standby within a few seconds of not being used, and the EVF sensor also does that. So instead of switching screen/EVF to my eye, I simply grab the camera and simultaneously halfpress the shutter. The camera wakes up on the way to my eye, and turns all the way off when I put it down.
Not working on mine, Viggo. Eco mode takes nearly 10 seconds to time out the display, but then my view finder's sensor is remaining active for one minute. I can't shorten that period. So the only way I can instantly turn off that sensor is by switching to the back display and letting that time out.

So the camera seems to be in standby, but in fact, the EVF sensor is still active. I would not have noticed this is I weren't walking when it was still dark in the morning.

Could you please try timing your EVF's sensor to see if you are getting different results? My menu options under Power Saving allow 1 minute as the shortest period of time before deactivating the EVF, and as the display of the EVF goes out before a minute, I now understand this "1 minute" to apply to the sensor.

Yes, I think we need an option, a firmware fix, to deactivate the sensor immediately, which might not be practical, or within, say, 2 seconds, rather than a full minute.
 
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Viggo

EOS 5D SR
Dec 13, 2010
4,212
773
Not working on mine, Viggo. Eco mode takes nearly 10 seconds to time out the display, but then my view finder's sensor is remaining active for one minute. I can't shorten that period. So the only way I can instantly turn off that sensor is by switching to the back display and letting that time out.

So the camera seems to be in standby, but in fact, the EVF sensor is still active. I would not have noticed this is I weren't walking when it was still dark in the morning.

Could you please try timing your EVF's sensor to see if you are getting different results? My menu options under Power Saving allow 1 minute as the shortest period of time before deactivating the EVF, and as the display of the EVF goes out before a minute, I now understand this "1 minute" to apply to the sensor.

Yes, I think we need an option, a firmware fix, to deactivate the sensor immediately, which might not be practical, or within, say, 2 seconds, rather than a full minute.
I tried now and I guess you’re right, but what works for me is that even if it turns on again it’s only briefly, and very seldom the way I carry my camera in BR strap it’s a non-issue. If I was using the normal neck-strap I can see the absolute frustration as the EVF is never left alone.
 
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YuengLinger

EOS 5D MK IV
Dec 20, 2012
2,576
679
Southeastern USA
I tried now and I guess you’re right, but what works for me is that even if it turns on again it’s only briefly, and very seldom the way I carry my camera in BR strap it’s a non-issue. If I was using the normal neck-strap I can see the absolute frustration as the EVF is never left alone.
When I noticed what was happening, I was just out with my kids, both early-birds, for a pre-dawn walk. No big deal! I have not take the EOS R to an event yet, and likely won't use it for any type of work until next month. So this is a great time for an adjustment period.

Thank you very much for trying yours to confirm mine isn't acting weirdly! I've had friends show me their BR systems, but I still prefer the old neckstrap. The benefits of the R still outweigh the quibbles by a quite a bit, and I'm determined to learn to switch back and forth manually from back display to EVF. Determined!

Unless somebody has another workaround? Which would still allow for the old neckstrap?
 
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Viggo

EOS 5D SR
Dec 13, 2010
4,212
773
When I noticed what was happening, I was just out with my kids, both early-birds, for a pre-dawn walk. No big deal! I have not take the EOS R to an event yet, and likely won't use it for any type of work until next month. So this is a great time for an adjustment period.

Thank you very much for trying on yours to confirm mine isn't acting weirdly! I've had friends show me their BR systems, but I still prefer the old neckstrap. The benefits of the R still outweigh the quibbles by a quite a bit, and I'm determined to learn to switch back and forth manually from back display to EVF. Determined!

Unless somebody has another workaround? Which would still allow for the old neckstrap?
How does your neck survive with the normal strap? I wouldn’t last five minutes :D
 
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YuengLinger

EOS 5D MK IV
Dec 20, 2012
2,576
679
Southeastern USA
Weekend update, regarding switching on and off the EVF...I'm starting to get used to it! The amount of customization that allows for being able to avoid menus, or to just go to a top level menu item in the My Menu tabs (instead of digging) is great.

If I'm using the R in the studio or some other situation where I'm not walking around with it, I can easily switch Display settings-->Display control back to Auto.
 

YuengLinger

EOS 5D MK IV
Dec 20, 2012
2,576
679
Southeastern USA
Instead of a strap included in the kit, there should be a $10 discount coupon towards a real strap. ;)
I don't use THAT one. It has no stretch or shock absorption. I use a neoprene one, and I often just carry the camera in-hand instead of around my neck when walking a long way.

And I do carry crosswise over one shoulder.

BR screws into the tripod socket underneath, right? I think that's one reason I never gave it a try. I like to be able to go immediately to tripod, though I must admit I haven't been carrying a tripod much lately.

Watching a BR video, the camera still seems to face viewfinder towards the body, in this case the hip. (And it looks like it would be bouncing quite a bit there!)

With the simple neoprene strap over one shoulder and across my torso, I don't get much neck strain and I have simplicity. Which is why at this point I'm willing to learn to switch the EVF off and on. Heck, I've had to relearn so many things with the R anyway!
 
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Viggo

EOS 5D SR
Dec 13, 2010
4,212
773
I don't use THAT one. It has no stretch or shock absorption. I use a neoprene one, and I often just carry the camera in-hand instead of around my neck when walking a long way.

And I do carry crosswise over one shoulder.

BR screws into the tripod socket underneath, right? I think that's one reason I never gave it a try. I like to be able to go immediately to tripod, though I must admit I haven't been carrying a tripod much lately.

Watching a BR video, the camera still seems to face viewfinder towards the body, in this case the hip. (And it looks like it would be bouncing quite a bit there!)

With the simple neoprene strap over one shoulder and across my torso, I don't get much neck strain and I have simplicity. Which is why at this point I'm willing to learn to switch the EVF off and on. Heck, I've had to relearn so many things with the R anyway!
I does not have the EVF against the body, it’s either facing one o’clock or eleven o’clock . If it bounces the strap is adjuster too long, I have it right above the hip and it rests on the hip between camera and lens. I’ve read before people saying it occupies the tripodmount, but it takes four seconds extra to undo, the same amount of time you spend lifting the camera off your neck (y)
 
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CanonFanBoy

EOS 5D SR
Jan 28, 2015
4,080
1,624
Irving, Texas
I don't use THAT one. It has no stretch or shock absorption. I use a neoprene one, and I often just carry the camera in-hand instead of around my neck when walking a long way.

And I do carry crosswise over one shoulder.

BR screws into the tripod socket underneath, right? I think that's one reason I never gave it a try. I like to be able to go immediately to tripod, though I must admit I haven't been carrying a tripod much lately.

Watching a BR video, the camera still seems to face viewfinder towards the body, in this case the hip. (And it looks like it would be bouncing quite a bit there!)

With the simple neoprene strap over one shoulder and across my torso, I don't get much neck strain and I have simplicity. Which is why at this point I'm willing to learn to switch the EVF off and on. Heck, I've had to relearn so many things with the R anyway!
I'm using a long strap that crosses my chest. I also have a BR. But thinking of just going to a wrist strap.

The R is my favorite camera ever.
 
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iamjhil

I'm New Here
Feb 5, 2018
10
1
I primarily use my Eos R for Video. When recording in manual, i wish you could press the magnify button to check focus. My previous camera (A7SII) did and it was great.
 
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CanonFanBoy

EOS 5D SR
Jan 28, 2015
4,080
1,624
Irving, Texas
I primarily use my Eos R for Video. When recording in manual, i wish you could press the magnify button to check focus. My previous camera (A7SII) did and it was great.
The R has the manual focus aid which can be viewed through the viewfinder or on the screen (green arrows). You can touch the screen to place it anywhere you like. It is always dead on. Since I don't do video, I assume you want manual focus transitions to slow them down for artistic effect. The focus aid would let you do that while keeping the framing as you like it... which magnification makes tough to do. However, that may not suit your needs.

Then, in auto, there is DPAF touch focus. Also always dead on.

What would be cool is a way to slow down the change in touch focus point when in auto. Right now, it is near instantaneous. It would be cool if the videographer could change the time it takes to pull focus on the touch screen. In other words, instead of instantaneous, the camera could take a little time to slowly and smoothly switch between focus points so that it looks like focus is being pulled manually. That would be cool.
 
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