Dragonflies and Damselflies

AlanF

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Aug 16, 2012
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I took the trusty old 5DSR and 100-400mm II out today to try for some close ups. Instead got some DIFs, an Emperor flying straight at me, a pair of Common Blue Damselflies (with the dimmest of reflections), and a Blacktailed Skimmer that was so far away it was only 290 px long so I enlarged it 2x.

3Q7A3093-DxO_emperor_dragonfly_flying_towards_me-lsss.jpg
3Q7A3090-DxO_male+female_blue_damselflies_flying.jpg
3Q7A3096-DxO_blacktailed_dragonfly_flying-lsss-2_00x.jpg
 

ISv

"The equipment that matters, is you"
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The closest I got to a close up was an Emperor 5m away. They rarely land so I was quite pleased. I couldn't use point focus as it was quite windy and the reeds moved too much and fast. The centre 9 points worked,

View attachment 190994

Yeah, I know that feeling when some of this kind of flyers sit down! The guy bellow (Cordulegaster heros, as it came later, not my ID - I'm not that good with the Dragons) was flying along the trail (Europe) and I didn't have time to stop and try photo in fly - there were thunders coming closer and closer and we were rushing to get to the car ASAP. And at once it landed just in front of me!!! 4.47 meters (and they are 1-1.5cm bigger than the Emperor!) also windy (but it was going to almost slow time to time) because of the nearing storm. Very lucky shot!
Cordulegaster heros 2_DxO.jpg
 

ISv

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A hover at 80° bank would lead to an astounding acceleration. :p
But it is possible that the dragonfly was doing a "hammerhead" in more or less 0g. They seem to be pretty skilled in aerobatics..
So much easier to shoot when they are grounded.. Or maybe not :rolleyes:

https://flic.kr/p/2jeGRwf] F36A8241_ZS_DMap_2p_ret_DxO_full[/url] by https://www.flickr.com/photos/156501403@N04/]Erik Astrom[/url], on Flickr
Very nice photo Erik! BTW I don't understand how you and Privatebydesign are calculating the g-force without knowing the speed of the dragon and the radius of the turn?!
No, it wasn't hovering - it was flying strait (and I was expecting to get it closer for meaningful photo) when it made one of these nearly 90° turns (I don't know the radius of the turn either but with these guys I have seen very sharp turns!).
 
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privatebydesign

I post too Much on Here!!
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Very nice photo Erik! BTW I don't understand how you and Privatebydesign are calculating the g-force without knowing the speed of the dragon and the radius of the turn?!
No, it wasn't hovering - it was flying strait (and I was expecting to get it closer for meaningful photo) when it made one of these nearly 90° turns (I don't know the radius of the turn either but with these guys I have seen very sharp turns!).
I was saying the same thing, you can’t calculate the g force from bank angle alone.

Taking it to an extreme, if it was dead or unconscious so in free fall it could be at any angle and be at zero g.
 
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Maximilian

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... calculating the g-force without knowing the speed of the dragon and the radius of the turn?! ...
I was just about to post the same :ROFLMAO:

Of course, if the flying characteristics (uplift, etc.) of that dragon was known in detail, one (an avionic enigneer) could calculate needed speed and radius for it to acheive the requred minimum g-force for that maneuver. But as this order has four flexible and adaptable wings, so getting the characteristics might be a little bit difficult ;):cool:
 

Erik X

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BTW I don't understand how you and Privatebydesign are calculating the g-force without knowing the speed of the dragon and the radius of the turn?!
In a stationary turn (without any sideslip or change of altitude), the load factor is solely dependent of the bank angle. Speed is not involved at all. Turn rate and turn radius depend on both speed and load factor
bank1.JPG

bank2.JPG
 

Maximilian

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Pretty difficult to catch but I managed to get this white-tailed skimmer (orthetrum albistylum, still I'm not sure if I determite this one right) in 2 out of 20:
Edit:
It is a black-tailed skimmer (orthetrum cancellatum)


skimmer_DIF1.JPG


skimmer_DIF2.JPG
 
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Maximilian

The dark side - I've been there
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I don't really know how to distinguish between a white and black tailed skimmer. Difficult shots, well done.
Sharp pictures. Well done, Maximilian.
a025.gif
Thanks to the both of you for the comments and "likes".

AlanF:
I followed your example and recommendation and reduced the shutter speed to 1/800 for wing motion blur.
1/640 was to slow and caused motion blur of the body, because of its movement and my mediocre tracking skills.
 

ISv

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I don't really know how to distinguish between a white and black tailed skimmer. Difficult shots, well done.
See the locally highlighted spot: in the Black-tailed it is black (like in the Maximilian's photo). In the White-tailed it should be white!
skimmer_DIF1_DxO.jpg