Kickstarter: The Universal Lens Cap by KUVRD

KUVRD

EOS M6 Mark II
Dec 13, 2017
64
1
Provo, Utah
www.kuvrdcamera.com
snoke said:
Talys said:
Thanks for coming on and replying to so many posts. It's pretty awesome to see a product designer answer
KUVRD said:
Will likely reposition / alter your variable ND or CPL ring orientation each time you use it. NEVER in my life have I ever heard of a photographer who literally pulls out their camera and just takes a shot…. Photographers are ALWAYS adjusting knobs, camera settings, lenses etc. because of light, subject proximity, motion, etc.

The difference, though, is on a Variable ND or CPL, you set it to taste for the purpose, and may run around a whole bunch (like, while hiking) and you may not need to fuss with the filter again for a while (if you're taking similar types of shots).

KURVD right, Talys wrong.

Talys said:
KUVRD said:
Masks the true size/shape of the lens in your bag, making lenses harder to identify. haha, okay this was kind of a funny one. I don’t know about you, but I know of only three people that have more than 5 lenses…

Without trying to sound confrontational, I think there are a lot of people participating on this forum who have a whole lot more than 5 lenses :) I know I do, and some of them that I may carry around at the same time do have similar dimensions. Maybe a solution is to offer colored, patterned, or otherwise marked ones in the future.

Smart Talys. Optional extra: color stripe on rubber. Good.

OH! A color strip on rubber... interesting idea!
 

mnclayshooter

I love shooting - clay pigeons and photos!
Oct 28, 2013
314
0
Minnesota, USA
What is the vapor permanence rating of the product?


To be more blunt: Wrapping your lens in something that effectively locks all liquid phase, solid phase and/or vapor phase water up against and inside the lens body CANNOT be a good idea, especially for those of us who live in cold climates and travel from inside to outside and back inside (warm/humid to extreme cold/dry to warm/humid) and deal with condensation issues regularly. Some suggest that wrapping your gear actually helps reduce condensation issues, which, in theory, it does... for vapor... but not for snow/ice/water that is physically already in contact with the equipment.


Allowing water to evaporate and leave the lens body is important for any outdoor photographer if they hope to reduce potential for microbial growth in/on their equipment.


Also, what is the modulus of elasticity of the product at various cold temps... for example: -40,-20F, 0F, 20F, 40F, 60F?


What stability does the product have over time (will any of it's compounds/chemical makeup outgas or degrade in various exposures such as heat- potentially levels achieved if equipment is left in the trunk of a car in mid-summer heat, UV exposure, various solvents such as lens cleaners, sensor swab chemicals, sunscreen for the photographer, sweat, bodily oils etc). And does it have potential to dissolve the paint from the lens body?


For example... getting sunscreen on wood furniture, car paint, or just about anything else will, over time, peel the finish. Most common solvents will also do this to plastic/elastic materials.


In other words, how much lab testing has been done, and what are the results?
 

KUVRD

EOS M6 Mark II
Dec 13, 2017
64
1
Provo, Utah
www.kuvrdcamera.com
snoke said:
KUVRD said:
Hey, thanks for responding with your first sentence! Much appreciated! To respond to your second sentence, we intentionally stated that the ULCs are Shock-Absorbent and never state that it is drop-proof or shock-proof. You're totally right with a heavier and more expensive lens because we tried it! We purposefully conducted drop tests at a height from the hip, dropping one lens 43 times onto concrete (twice the size of a lens shown in the GIF), and another two lenses 27 times and 18 times onto asphalt before noticing internal damage...

Damage never happen only last time. Each drop weaken lens. When you do focal calibration check? When you do autofocus test?

Drop test dumb idea. People do it themselves. Damage lens. Maybe minuscule damage cannot see. Damage still exist.

Drop test dumb marketing.

Thank you for your comment! We did a focal calibration test, autofocus test and aesthetics test after every 3 drops. You're right though that it was a dumb test... we lost three lenses because of it... haha.. but yes, damage happens over time but one can drop a lens once and at just the right angle, height and point of contact, it will break the lenses. This is why we state it is shock-absorbent and not shock/drop-proof.
 

KUVRD

EOS M6 Mark II
Dec 13, 2017
64
1
Provo, Utah
www.kuvrdcamera.com
Talys said:
Thanks for coming on and replying to so many posts. It's pretty awesome to see a product designer answer questions.

KUVRD said:
Does not coexist with hoods at all; no reversing hoods possible, more space in bag wasted on hood storage. For all the photographers who use hoods, this is not an issue. This is NOT a CON. It still stretches over a lens hood in reverse or when it’s locked into place at the end of lens. You are right that it does not work if you put the ULC on first and THEN the lens hood. It will not grab onto the filter ring. But, you can still put the lens hood over the ULC. It just wouldn’t be locked into place. Meaning it would not take up more space.

I think the easiest way to overcome this and objections about the time to put on or take off a lens cap is to have these in camera stores, were someone like me can just try it for themselves. It's really hard for me to imagine the efficacy of a this with a hood, but it's entirely possible that I'm just not imagining it right.

Also, many Canon lens hoods have a button to unlock (facing outwards). Wouldn't this concept interfere with that?

I also have a hard time imagining this being very helpful in being protective on some reversed hoods (or more protective than a regular lens cap), like 24-70 f/4, which has quite a bit larger outer diameter than the lens, but is quite shallow.


KUVRD said:
Will likely reposition / alter your variable ND or CPL ring orientation each time you use it. NEVER in my life have I ever heard of a photographer who literally pulls out their camera and just takes a shot…. Photographers are ALWAYS adjusting knobs, camera settings, lenses etc. because of light, subject proximity, motion, etc. In addition, we’ve stretched a Universal Lens Cap onto a lens, moved it around and then taken it off 115 times in a row, check periodically to see if the focusing ring or zoom ring change and the end result was that the focus ring was off focus by a few degrees. NOT enough of a PRO or a CON to place it on one side or the other.

The difference, though, is on a Variable ND or CPL, you set it to taste for the purpose, and may run around a whole bunch (like, while hiking) and you may not need to fuss with the filter again for a while (if you're taking similar types of shots). Unlike a dial or knob, you can't see if it moved on you, and there's no lock. Especially if you're outdoors, between stretches, you might want to pop a lens cap on to prevent your filter from getting scratched (since those can be super expensive), or even dirty (since some can also be a pain to clean).

On the other hand, the outer diameter of the filter is usually slightly smaller than the lens barrel, so perhaps it won't get moved much, because contact with the filter ring is minimal?

KUVRD said:
Masks the true size/shape of the lens in your bag, making lenses harder to identify. haha, okay this was kind of a funny one. I don’t know about you, but I know of only three people that have more than 5 lenses…

Without trying to sound confrontational, I think there are a lot of people participating on this forum who have a whole lot more than 5 lenses :) I know I do, and some of them that I may carry around at the same time do have similar dimensions. Maybe a solution is to offer colored, patterned, or otherwise marked ones in the future.


For myself, it's hard to imagine this as a solution for me. I know we're talking about only few seconds here and there, but I it doesn't seem like there are enough advantages to justify that. However, I respect that you guys are trying to make something new and innovative, and if I see this in a camera store, I'll give it a fair shake!

Thanks much for your time.

I think the easiest way to overcome this and objections about the time to put on or take off a lens cap is to have these in camera stores, were someone like me can just try it for themselves. It's really hard for me to imagine the efficacy of a this with a hood, but it's entirely possible that I'm just not imagining it right.

Excellent point! Our plan is to finish up the Crowdfunding Stages within the next 3 months and then get them into retail stores for people to try them out and see for themselves if they like it!

Also, many Canon lens hoods have a button to unlock (facing outwards). Wouldn't this concept interfere with that?

Actually, it totally interferes with Canon Lens Hoods. The best would be putting on the lens hood in reverse, locking it into place and then stretching the ULC over the reversed lens hood.

I also have a hard time imagining this being very helpful in being protective on some reversed hoods (or more protective than a regular lens cap), like 24-70 f/4, which has quite a bit larger outer diameter than the lens, but is quite shallow.

Because of the ULCs elasticity, it can still stretch over the lens hood without issues!


Without trying to sound confrontational, I think there are a lot of people participating on this forum who have a whole lot more than 5 lenses I know I do, and some of them that I may carry around at the same time do have similar dimensions. Maybe a solution is to offer colored, patterned, or otherwise marked ones in the future.

Great idea! We might just do that in the future, which would allow a way to differentiate lenses. Thank you for that insight!

For myself, it's hard to imagine this as a solution for me. I know we're talking about only few seconds here and there, but I it doesn't seem like there are enough advantages to justify that. However, I respect that you guys are trying to make something new and innovative, and if I see this in a camera store, I'll give it a fair shake!

Thank you for your feedback and hopefully we’ll be able to get it into camera stores soon for that exact reason!
 

KUVRD

EOS M6 Mark II
Dec 13, 2017
64
1
Provo, Utah
www.kuvrdcamera.com
mnclayshooter said:
What is the vapor permanence rating of the product?


To be more blunt: Wrapping your lens in something that effectively locks all liquid phase, solid phase and/or vapor phase water up against and inside the lens body CANNOT be a good idea, especially for those of us who live in cold climates and travel from inside to outside and back inside (warm/humid to extreme cold/dry to warm/humid) and deal with condensation issues regularly. Some suggest that wrapping your gear actually helps reduce condensation issues, which, in theory, it does... for vapor... but not for snow/ice/water that is physically already in contact with the equipment.


Allowing water to evaporate and leave the lens body is important for any outdoor photographer if they hope to reduce potential for microbial growth in/on their equipment.


Also, what is the modulus of elasticity of the product at various cold temps... for example: -40,-20F, 0F, 20F, 40F, 60F?


What stability does the product have over time (will any of it's compounds/chemical makeup outgas or degrade in various exposures such as heat- potentially levels achieved if equipment is left in the trunk of a car in mid-summer heat, UV exposure, various solvents such as lens cleaners, sensor swab chemicals, sunscreen for the photographer, sweat, bodily oils etc). And does it have potential to dissolve the paint from the lens body?


For example... getting sunscreen on wood furniture, car paint, or just about anything else will, over time, peel the finish. Most common solvents will also do this to plastic/elastic materials.


In other words, how much lab testing has been done, and what are the results?

What is the vapor permanence rating of the product?

To be more blunt: Wrapping your lens in something that effectively locks all liquid phase, solid phase and/or vapor phase water up against and inside the lens body CANNOT be a good idea, especially for those of us who live in cold climates and travel from inside to outside and back inside (warm/humid to extreme cold/dry to warm/humid) and deal with condensation issues regularly. Some suggest that wrapping your gear actually helps reduce condensation issues, which, in theory, it does... for vapor... but not for snow/ice/water that is physically already in contact with the equipment.

Allowing water to evaporate and leave the lens body is important for any outdoor photographer if they hope to reduce potential for microbial growth in/on their equipment.

Now these are great questions! We have a couple of photographers who have used the ULC in Iceland and in the Great Rocky Mountains and state that there were no issues…. but they were there for only a week which, in my mind, wouldn’t be a strong enough case to determine if potentially trapped humidity over a long period of time - because of the ULC - wouldn’t negatively affect a lens. We also have a concert photographer who travels all around the world photographing the DJs at Techno Concerts. He enters and exits dry, humid, wet, cold and hot environments on a daily basis and has reported no issues with his lenses using the ULC. Finally, we have NOT received a vapor permanence rating.

Also, what is the modulus of elasticity of the product at various cold temps... for example: -40,-20F, 0F, 20F, 40F, 60F?

What stability does the product have over time (will any of it's compounds/chemical makeup outgas or degrade in various exposures such as heat- potentially levels achieved if equipment is left in the trunk of a car in mid-summer heat, UV exposure, various solvents such as lens cleaners, sensor swab chemicals, sunscreen for the photographer, sweat, bodily oils etc). And does it have potential to dissolve the paint from the lens body?

For example... getting sunscreen on wood furniture, car paint, or just about anything else will, over time, peel the finish. Most common solvents will also do this to plastic/elastic materials.

In other words, how much lab testing has been done, and what are the results?

Another awesome question! We are testing that now to determine elasticity at -20F, 0F, 20F, 40F, 75F, 100F and 200F. We’ll leave them in those temperature controlled environments for 1 hour, 3 hours, 6 hours, 24 hours and 48 hours, testing the elasticity at each tier to determine the elasticity of the ULC. We’ll have to get back to you about this test results. In regards to structural integrity, it has indefinite stability… but if any of the materials or workmanship of the ULC degrade or the ULC breaks in some way, it’s guaranteed for life so we’ll replace it at that point. Hopefully that helped answer your questions a bit. :)
 

unfocused

EOS-1D X Mark III
Jul 20, 2010
6,224
3,630
67
Springfield, IL
www.mgordoncommunications.com
I feel like we've harassed Mr. Kuvrd about enough. He's been very patient, but I think it's time to wrap up this thread. Anyone with half a brain can determine for themselves whether or not this is a product they would be interested in. The dead horse has been flogged into dust at this point.
 

jolyonralph

EOS R5 Mark II
CR Pro
Aug 25, 2015
1,421
928
London, UK
www.everyothershot.com
Now I saw this today and immediately starting wondering if this might be connected ;D


https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/twopillars/unilid?ref=rrea.ch&utm_source=rrea.ch&utm_medium=facebook&utm_term=rrea.ch&utm_campaign=wwhb_006
 

ahsanford

Particular Member
Aug 16, 2012
8,617
1,642
jolyonralph said:
Now I saw this today and immediately starting wondering if this might be connected ;D

https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/twopillars/unilid?ref=rrea.ch&utm_source=rrea.ch&utm_medium=facebook&utm_term=rrea.ch&utm_campaign=wwhb_006

Silicone is everywhere these days. It's a problem-solver, yo:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ytc-LWxPFVg

We use a set of covers like this (Magnifique is the brand) in our kitchen. It's gold for leftovers when you don't want to transfer from your bowl to Tupperware and it has eliminated the need to waste Saran wrap in the microwave to block splatter.

So it's not a flying leap to extrapolate covering things (my link above) to wrapping things (your prior link) to protecting a camera lens. You just need to play around with the durometer to get the right balance of firm/stretchy and then you start optimizing the shape, dialing in the grippable elements, surface finish, etc.

It's not a trivial endeavor to bring a product like this to market -- not at all. But the progression of applications of these materials makes perfect sense.

- A