Post Your Abstracts

NancyP

EOS R
Dec 17, 2013
1,297
14
Thanks, Justin. That design makes sense now - I take it that the fan sits right on top of it so there's no point in getting more surface area in the center. I haven't really paid attention to computer innards for a while, having done no patch-or-exchange on a model newer than 2010.
 

j-nord

Derp
Feb 16, 2016
467
4
Colorado
NancyP said:
Thanks, Justin. That design makes sense now - I take it that the fan sits right on top of it so there's no point in getting more surface area in the center. I haven't really paid attention to computer innards for a while, having done no patch-or-exchange on a model newer than 2010.

Not to completely derail this thread but this is a B&W image, the middle circle is solid copper that sits flush and fully covers the cpu. The copper, being more conductive, transfers the heat away quicker to the cheaper outer aluminum heat spreader. The fan sits directly on top and blows down on the whole heatsink. This is just a cheap, awful, stock cooler. Aftermarket heatsink/cooler kits utilize heat pipes and are, of course, much bigger. My cpu is water cooled though. That design is a piece of copper with water continuously flowing over it. The pump pulls/pushes the water to a large radiator elsewhere in the computer case. I need aftermarket cooling since my cpu has a pretty good overclock on it.
 

dpc

EOS-1D X Mark III
Dec 11, 2013
6,493
4,528
Western Canada
Barbed wire coil down on the ranch.
 

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Jack Douglas

CR for the Humour
Apr 10, 2013
6,858
2,473
Alberta, Canada
I'd be pleased if someone/anyone would offer some hints (a list maybe) as to what makes for the best abstracts. Are there any principles or guidelines? Myself, when the item is readily identifiable some of the appeal seems to fade but I'm sure that's not always the case.

Jack
 

dpc

EOS-1D X Mark III
Dec 11, 2013
6,493
4,528
Western Canada
Jack Douglas said:
I'd be pleased if someone/anyone would offer some hints (a list maybe) as to what makes for the best abstracts. Are there any principles or guidelines? Myself, when the item is readily identifiable some of the appeal seems to fade but I'm sure that's not always the case.

Jack

I would generally agree with the original poster that something abstract should be difficult to identify. One is concentrating on line, colour, general form or whatnot rather than the thing in itself (let's not wax philosophical on that one!). However, there is no clearly defined criteria. Under the above definition, sketchy as it is, I wouldn't consider my posting as abstract. However, my intention was to focus on the discoloured node of spikes to the left of centre in the picture. So I wasn't interested in barbed wire qua barbed wire but in the form and colour of that element. One of the issues I sometimes have is finding an appropriate place to put a picture. Sometimes there doesn't seem to be a clear choice. Perhaps I should have placed the picture in my Textures thread, but that doesn't seem quite right, either. Anywhooooooo.....
 

tolusina

EOS RP
Mar 1, 2012
796
17
dpc said:
..... I wouldn't consider my posting as abstract. However, my intention was to focus on the discoloured node of spikes to the left of centre in the picture. So I wasn't interested in barbed wire qua barbed wire but in the form and colour of that element. .....

I'd call it abstract.
It's not the normal or expected configuration of barbed wire, that it's on a roll is not apparent in the photo.
It's got lines, angles, twists, patterns, all good.
Maybe a bit overexposed, too little depth of field. If the barbs on the right had feelings, they'd feel snubbed for no good reason.
I think the scene calls for clarity as seen in several other photos in this thread.

I think the scene or similar is worth a re-shoot, it's a decent concept.
Maybe play with lighting for subtle or dramatic shadows, perhaps LED lighting or gels to cast a cold blue on the steel.

You've a well established skill and eye for capturing interesting images from rather mundane environments, I learn from your examples.
 

Jack Douglas

CR for the Humour
Apr 10, 2013
6,858
2,473
Alberta, Canada
dpc said:
Jack Douglas said:
I'd be pleased if someone/anyone would offer some hints (a list maybe) as to what makes for the best abstracts. Are there any principles or guidelines? Myself, when the item is readily identifiable some of the appeal seems to fade but I'm sure that's not always the case.

Jack

I would generally agree with the original poster that something abstract should be difficult to identify. One is concentrating on line, colour, general form or whatnot rather than the thing in itself (let's not wax philosophical on that one!). However, there is no clearly defined criteria. Under the above definition, sketchy as it is, I wouldn't consider my posting as abstract. However, my intention was to focus on the discoloured node of spikes to the left of centre in the picture. So I wasn't interested in barbed wire qua barbed wire but in the form and colour of that element. One of the issues I sometimes have is finding an appropriate place to put a picture. Sometimes there doesn't seem to be a clear choice. Perhaps I should have placed the picture in my Textures thread, but that doesn't seem quite right, either. Anywhooooooo.....

Hope it doesn't seem like I'm passing any kind of judgment, I'm just a naturally curious person trying to soak up insights. I guess the term itself implies it can't be easily pinned down.

Jack
 

dpc

EOS-1D X Mark III
Dec 11, 2013
6,493
4,528
Western Canada
Jack Douglas said:
dpc said:
Jack Douglas said:
I'd be pleased if someone/anyone would offer some hints (a list maybe) as to what makes for the best abstracts. Are there any principles or guidelines? Myself, when the item is readily identifiable some of the appeal seems to fade but I'm sure that's not always the case.

Jack

I would generally agree with the original poster that something abstract should be difficult to identify. One is concentrating on line, colour, general form or whatnot rather than the thing in itself (let's not wax philosophical on that one!). However, there is no clearly defined criteria. Under the above definition, sketchy as it is, I wouldn't consider my posting as abstract. However, my intention was to focus on the discoloured node of spikes to the left of centre in the picture. So I wasn't interested in barbed wire qua barbed wire but in the form and colour of that element. One of the issues I sometimes have is finding an appropriate place to put a picture. Sometimes there doesn't seem to be a clear choice. Perhaps I should have placed the picture in my Textures thread, but that doesn't seem quite right, either. Anywhooooooo.....

Hope it doesn't seem like I'm passing any kind of judgment, I'm just a naturally curious person trying to soak up insights. I guess the term itself implies it can't be easily pinned down.

Jack


:)
 

MalingJemuran

I'm New Here
May 29, 2013
14
21
K-amps said:
MalingJemuran said:

Very interesting shot... can you show us the rig? seems like simultaneous rotation of the camera as well as zooming in the same time... very cool.

Thanks K-amps. The rig is 60D and 10-22mm handheld. I rotate the camera by the lens axis and hold the zoom ring so it doesn't rotate along with the camera. Learned this this trick from Bryan Peterson's book Understanding Shutter Speed.
 

Click

I post too Much on Here!!
Jul 29, 2012
15,053
3,927
Canada
MalingJemuran said:
Thanks K-amps. The rig is 60D and 10-22mm handheld. I rotate the camera by the lens axis and hold the zoom ring so it doesn't rotate along with the camera. Learned this this trick from Bryan Peterson's book Understanding Shutter Speed.

That's cool. Thanks for sharing. :)
 

GMCPhotographics

EOS 5D Mark IV
CR Pro
Aug 22, 2010
1,702
424
51
Uk
www.GMCPhotographics.co.uk
MalingJemuran said:
K-amps said:
MalingJemuran said:

Very interesting shot... can you show us the rig? seems like simultaneous rotation of the camera as well as zooming in the same time... very cool.

Thanks K-amps. The rig is 60D and 10-22mm handheld. I rotate the camera by the lens axis and hold the zoom ring so it doesn't rotate along with the camera. Learned this this trick from Bryan Peterson's book Understanding Shutter Speed.
Ha! I've been doing a similar thing recently too:
26828459965_3c5047888b_b.jpg

Canon 5DIII, ef 16-35mm f2.8 II L (although any decent wide zoom will do).

While on the subject of abstraction via shutter speed effects:
26856122485_4e3b663fe9_b.jpg

Canon 5DIII, ef 70-200 f2.8 LIS II

This is a zoom burst at sunrise:
26555851740_5db1ac7fd5_b.jpg

Canon 5DIII, ef 16-35mm f2.8 II L (although any decent wide zoom will do).
 

Click

I post too Much on Here!!
Jul 29, 2012
15,053
3,927
Canada
I really like your pictures, GMCPhotographics...Especially the last one.
 

cid

"light is defining shape"
Nov 27, 2012
401
0
500px.com
I just processed one yesterday, so I'm happy to share it - I consider it being more abstract than architecture, since it's more about the lines and shapes than about the building ...



 

Sporgon

5% of gear used 95% of the time
CR Pro
Nov 11, 2012
4,326
1,006
Yorkshire, England
cid said:
I just processed one yesterday, so I'm happy to share it - I consider it being more abstract than architecture, since it's more about the lines and shapes than about the building ...




Rouen ? If I'm wrong it is abstract enough ;)

Here's one from me: no pp filter, just the effect of the optics and the light on the beach.
 

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