Canon Patents

In Body Stabilization Patent?

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patent - In Body Stabilization Patent?

Patent Fun
I like to lead with the following, I am the worst reader of patent language on planet earth.

I’ve been sent an email explaining this patent.

“The image pickup element vibrationproof circuit 172 cancels vibration of an image by moving the image pickup element 127” and “Here, an image pickup element vibrationproof mechanism 171 connected to the image pickup element vibrationproof circuit 172 shifts and rotates the image pickup element 127 in the direction to cancel shakes of the image so as to prevent the resolution of the image from being lost as the image rolls.”

Is this in body stabilization that works together with in lens stabilization? The language of it seems to suggest so to me.

Also notice the GPS circuit, Digital TV Tuner and Wireless Communication Circuit.

What say you?

Read The Full Patent: http://www.freepatentsonline.com/20100103305.pdf

thanks sean

cr

121 responses to “In Body Stabilization Patent?”

  1. I wonder if anybody actually uses the Direct Print function… I mean, IT IS 2010, and every 12-year-old and his/her mother has a basic command of photoshop. If you spend as much money as you do on the camera, you’d probably want it looking as good as possible. Hence the invention of Lightroom/Photoshop/iPhoto/etc intermediaries between photos and the printer.

  2. Hmm, where do changes in angle come from, if not from rotations?

    You might imagine the in-lens IS correcting rotations, as all IS lenses do now, and the in-body IS linear=translation shake.

    This would work will all lenses except the new 100 Macro HIS, which already does both.

    But the linear IS is important only for very close focusing, that is why so far it has been included only in a macro lens.

  3. Will it blend? *That* is the question!

    you will find out when Photokina comes.

  4. Great! That way you can get 18% gray over the whole frame, no matter what scene you shoot!

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