Third Party Accessories

Introducing Loupedeck+, the Next Evolution of Custom Photo Editing Console, Loupedeck

Next Generation Includes Skylum Aurora HDR Compatibility, Upgraded Build and More Customization Options, All Based on the Photography Community’s Feedback

HELSINKI, Finland – June 20, 2018 – Loupedeck, the custom photo editing console built with an intuitive design that makes editing faster and more creative, has announced the next evolution, Loupedeck+. While the Loupedeck was the only device on the market custom-built to improve the Adobe Lightroom experience, the Loupedeck+ is now also compatible with popular photo editing software Skylum Aurora HDR (in addition to Adobe Lightroom Classic CC), and is designed with more functionalities, control and increased customization options. Following a year of overwhelming success and customer feedback, the Loupedeck+ was designed in Loupedeck’s headquarters in Finland, with all updates solely based on feedback from the invested photography community.

Specifically, upgrades to the Loupedeck+ include:

  • Mechanical keys with a more precise and sturdy feel
  • Improved build quality
  • Two dedicated customizable dials and seventeen buttons
  • “Custom Mode” that allows full user control of all dials
  • Configuration software built from scratch for an even better, faster and more stable photo editing experience

“We know how dedicated both the professional and amateur photography communities are in their work, and we’re committed to making their lives easier and more productive,” said Mikko Kesti, Founder and CEO of Loupedeck. “There’s no better way to create the next evolution of our flagship product than by going straight to the source and taking their feedback to heart. By adding even more control, efficiency and customization options to the editing process, we’re able to help photographers be more successful by increasing their output and artistry, and look forward to continue supporting them in their work.”

Following Loupedeck’s new partnership with Skylum, the Loupedeck+ will include future integrations with Skylum’s other professional photo editing products, including Skylum Luminar. It is also currently in beta integration with Capture One, with full integration on the way, as well as additional software integrations to follow later this year. These options will provide photographers with a more diverse, intuitive experience, helping to expedite the editing process and maximize the photo editing experience.

“Skylum and Loupedeck share the same vision. We want to help photographers create great photos, differently,” said Alex Tsepko, CEO of Sklyum. “When I discovered that the new version of Loupedeck keyboard is coming out, I knew Skylum software should be the first to support it. This is the kind of innovation modern photographers really need.”

The Loupedeck+ is available for purchase in the Loupedeck Online Store, B&H Photo and Amazon.com for $229. Loupedeck is also offering a cashback opportunity of $50 for current Loupedeck owners.

For more information visit www.loupedeck.com.

Oct 22, 2014
50
0
#2
As cool as this seems, can anybody who's used this tell me whether or not it makes any difference to photo flow? I'm possibly being unimaginative, but I cannot see in anyway how this would be easier and/ or make workflow faster.
 
#3
Anyone interested in the Loupedeck should have a look at MIDI2LR.
https://rsjaffe.github.io/MIDI2LR/

MIDI2LR allows you to control most of LightRoom's tools using any MIDI control board. A popular one is the BEHRINGER X-TOUCH MINI, which costs a whole USD$50. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B013JLZCLS/ Even better, the whole system is fully customizable, so you can assign whatever LR controls you want to the physical controls of your particular MIDI system.

I spent a lot of time looking at the original Loupedeck, but it is rather expensive. After hearing about MIDI2LR in some comments, I tried it and have never looked back. Having physical controls is a HUGE speed boost, but there is no need to expensive custom hardware. Don't worry about MIDI hardware... most of these systems are USB based, and simple easy to setup and use.
 

cayenne

EOS 7D Mark II
Mar 28, 2012
1,651
3
#4
jkreibich said:
Anyone interested in the Loupedeck should have a look at MIDI2LR.
https://rsjaffe.github.io/MIDI2LR/

MIDI2LR allows you to control most of LightRoom's tools using any MIDI control board. A popular one is the BEHRINGER X-TOUCH MINI, which costs a whole USD$50. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B013JLZCLS/ Even better, the whole system is fully customizable, so you can assign whatever LR controls you want to the physical controls of your particular MIDI system.

I spent a lot of time looking at the original Loupedeck, but it is rather expensive. After hearing about MIDI2LR in some comments, I tried it and have never looked back. Having physical controls is a HUGE speed boost, but there is no need to expensive custom hardware. Don't worry about MIDI hardware... most of these systems are USB based, and simple easy to setup and use.
I'm getting away from the Adobe *rental* model of tools....
Right now, I'm using On1 RAW in lieu of LR....and Affinity Photo in place of PS.

I would really like a physical controller for use with those apps.

I've looked a bit into the MIDI thing....that Beringer unit, just from looks..appeared to be lightweight, plastic and cheap....just from appearances. If not, please let me know...for a control unit I'd want one solid that would sit on the desk and not move about ,etc.

But I'm not up on midi that well...can it be set to control ANY part of an application, or do the apps themselves have to have an API open to allow the functions to be controlled externally...and if so, how do you find out which controls are available, and how to connect each physical controller to each on screen control?

I'd originally looked into this type thing, but found out it only works really with Adobe products, but I did like the modularity aspect of it:

https://palettegear.com

Looks really cool, but again, likely won't meet my software needs....

Anyway, if you have more info on how to make these units work with more software I'd really be interested.

I'd really like to get one unit that I could map to say, ON1, Affinity...AND Davinci Resolve and FCPX....is there such a generic hardware beast that can be readily mapped to a number of different applications?

cayenne
 

LDS

EOS 80D
Sep 14, 2012
1,298
2
#5
One issue I found with MIDI controls is their range and granularity may not match Lightroom control ones. Something may be remediate at the software level, but I'd like a console which can take full advantage of LR (or other applications) settings.
 
Feb 26, 2015
18
0
#6
cayenne said:
jkreibich said:
Anyone interested in the Loupedeck should have a look at MIDI2LR.
https://rsjaffe.github.io/MIDI2LR/

MIDI2LR allows you to control most of LightRoom's tools using any MIDI control board. A popular one is the BEHRINGER X-TOUCH MINI, which costs a whole USD$50. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B013JLZCLS/ Even better, the whole system is fully customizable, so you can assign whatever LR controls you want to the physical controls of your particular MIDI system.

I spent a lot of time looking at the original Loupedeck, but it is rather expensive. After hearing about MIDI2LR in some comments, I tried it and have never looked back. Having physical controls is a HUGE speed boost, but there is no need to expensive custom hardware. Don't worry about MIDI hardware... most of these systems are USB based, and simple easy to setup and use.
I'm getting away from the Adobe *rental* model of tools....
Right now, I'm using On1 RAW in lieu of LR....and Affinity Photo in place of PS.

I would really like a physical controller for use with those apps.

I've looked a bit into the MIDI thing....that Beringer unit, just from looks..appeared to be lightweight, plastic and cheap....just from appearances. If not, please let me know...for a control unit I'd want one solid that would sit on the desk and not move about ,etc.

But I'm not up on midi that well...can it be set to control ANY part of an application, or do the apps themselves have to have an API open to allow the functions to be controlled externally...and if so, how do you find out which controls are available, and how to connect each physical controller to each on screen control?

I'd originally looked into this type thing, but found out it only works really with Adobe products, but I did like the modularity aspect of it:

https://palettegear.com

Looks really cool, but again, likely won't meet my software needs....

Anyway, if you have more info on how to make these units work with more software I'd really be interested.

I'd really like to get one unit that I could map to say, ON1, Affinity...AND Davinci Resolve and FCPX....is there such a generic hardware beast that can be readily mapped to a number of different applications?

cayenne
I am also not a midi expert, and I agree that the berginger x-touch mini seems a little limited.

I am currently using and loving the arturia beatstep pro with capture one.

I'm not aware of a direct midi to capture one like midi2lightroom, but you can use a midi controller with ANY software that allows keyboard shortcuts by using an intermediate program that translates midi to a keyboard shortcut.

I use Bome's midi translator which was really easy to configure. You basically set it to capture midi and push a control on your midi controller. Then you assign a keystroke combination you want the software to output. You're done! (Lots of details can be found here: https://phodograf.com/controller-1/)

As to the question of do the physical controls make a difference, they ABSOLUTELY do. Not only is it more fun, I am editing MUCH faster.

No more adjust white balance, then shift tint a little bit, then back to white balance because the tint adjustment effected it. Or highlights, then contrast, then highlights again. You can adjust multiple attributes at the same time, and it is fantastic!
 

drmikeinpdx

Celebrating 20 years of naughty photography!
#7
I see that Amazon does not yet list the new "+" version. The older version is offered at $179, however there were many complaints about the physical quality of the product in the reviews.

I've been waiting for some quality improvements before I try Loupedeck, so I think I will give this new version a try when it eventually shows up on Amazon.

As much as I use Lightroom, this could be a big time saver for me.
 

zim

EOS 7D Mark II
Oct 18, 2011
1,778
7
#9
How does it handle local adjustments? The demo vids on their web site are very basic
 

RGF

How you relate to the issue, is the issue.
Jul 13, 2012
2,640
0
#10
I find the LR slides hard to control, a small movement often causes larger changes than I would like.

A mechanical system could be value depending upon how it is implemented and of course, the cost.
 
Sep 13, 2012
30
0
#11
Cochese said:
As cool as this seems, can anybody who's used this tell me whether or not it makes any difference to photo flow? I'm possibly being unimaginative, but I cannot see in anyway how this would be easier and/ or make workflow faster.
I have owned the original for about 8 months now, and I find it invaluable for Lightroom. I ordered the new one the minute I saw the announcement.

Here’s where it makes a difference. Think about your eye movements when you use Lightroom. You stare at a photo, and decide it needs an adjustment. Say, you’re going to move exposure up, blacks down, highlights down, tweak WB and so on. Now for each of those actions your eye needs to follow your cursor over to the panel, precisely hit a tiny little slider, and then your eye flicks back to the photo as you adjust, then back again (to check the number value even). Maybe you then slightly move the slider too far before un-clicking the mouse button. You now have to move your eye back to the slider to catch the slider again. Rinse and repeat. Let’s say you do 10 adjustments per photo, with probably at least 20 eye movements total per photo.

Now imagine you just have a dial already in your fingertips for each of these values. You stare at the photo as your hands move about the dials, which you have memorized the location of after a few photos. Your eyes never leave the photo. Adjustments are done in about 10 seconds.

If I really concentrate, I can cut down my editing time by more than half. This is for huge volumes of photos mind you- say 800 or more photos for a wedding. This is where this thing really shines. If you only do 1-2 photos at a time it is unnecessary. But more importantly to me, it has made Lightroom fun to use again. I pretty much hate editing and I see it as a chore. The Loupedeck has brought back a measure of joy that I can’t really put a price on.

The buttons and build quality on the original sucked. I gave up trying to cull with it because one of the worst buttons was the right arrow key on my board. The buttons are wobbly and tightly fit, and would not actuate all the time, unless you hit it dead center (and got lucky). This would happen all across the whole board. As a result I would pretty much exclusively use the board for color corrections, and switch to regular keyboard for other things. Therefore I was never using all of the time saving features.

The new board is using Keihl PG1350 Brown mechanical switches (per a post on their social media) which you can see a video of here. https://youtu.be/1P_ucdyi1ms I’ll find out when I get my copy, but I can already see after watching a few YouTube reviews of keyboards that use these switches, these keys will be a world of difference. Clicky, tactile and reliable sounds really dang good when paired with all the Lightroom shortcuts that Loupedeck brings to the table. Especially for a few of the buttons like arrow keys that will get used thousands of times. These switches are rated to 50 million actuations.

Also, they claim the build quality overall is improved. That will be welcome. I will know in 2 weeks when I get mine. And then likely I will have an old one for sale, cheap. ;)
 
Sep 13, 2012
30
0
#12
Maiaibing said:
Can a control unit like this also handle setting the adjustment brush and filters in lightroom?
Here are two screenshots from their website. The L1, L2 and L3 buttons can be set to brush, gradient, radial or heal/clone brushes. Then the big control dial can be used to adjust brush size.
 

Attachments

9VIII

EOS 7D Mark II
Feb 8, 2013
1,843
0
#13
jdavidse said:
Cochese said:
As cool as this seems, can anybody who's used this tell me whether or not it makes any difference to photo flow? I'm possibly being unimaginative, but I cannot see in anyway how this would be easier and/ or make workflow faster.
I have owned the original for about 8 months now, and I find it invaluable for Lightroom. I ordered the new one the minute I saw the announcement.
*SNIP*
I would say that you really only need one wheel to accomplish “most” of the practical effect. If you can find a “wheel” peripheral that lets you select a given value, then precisely control it. The Microsoft Studio wheel thingy comes to mind, and also Logitech came out with a media keyboard with a wheel recently.

Of course both of those are either the same or far more expensive.

I look forward to hearing more hands-on reports of the updated Loupdeck (I don’t need it but I’m a sucker for things with lots of buttons).
 

Mt Spokane Photography

Spends too much time on this forum
Mar 25, 2011
14,396
18
#14
I've looked at the Midi solutions, and the issues with them, so I finally bit the bullet and ordered the Loupedeck+. I have issues using my fingers to control fine movements of my mouse, so I intend to see how well it works. It is definitely a low cost solution to a editing deck, for video, you can spend a lot more.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1394885-REG/slate_digital_sym_ravcore_dd_raven_mti_core_station.html
 

RGF

How you relate to the issue, is the issue.
Jul 13, 2012
2,640
0
#15
Mt Spokane Photography said:
I've looked at the Midi solutions, and the issues with them, so I finally bit the bullet and ordered the Loupedeck+. I have issues using my fingers to control fine movements of my mouse, so I intend to see how well it works. It is definitely a low cost solution to a editing deck, for video, you can spend a lot more.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1394885-REG/slate_digital_sym_ravcore_dd_raven_mti_core_station.html

please post a review of the loupedeck+ based on actual use by a real user. I can suspicious of many of the on line reviews which appear to be paid
 
Jan 27, 2012
2
0
#16
I'd agree with jdavidse's comments.

I used the Behringer X-Touch Mini for a while to get a feel for the hardware-controller lifestyle and it definitely was an improvement, but still left a lot to be desired. It was never on the same level build-quality wise as controllers from the likes of BlackMagic for Resolve.

I got the Loupedeck shortly after it was released and have since edited thousands of photos (weddings) on it. The keys (as jdavidse mentioned) are the biggest problem with the unit. They constantly stick and you have to hit them hard in the middle to make them work reliably. This makes culling tiresome (and I move back to my keyboard for that now). The actual photo manipulation controls are generally good, but some of the dials are starting to become less accurate now. The large crop and rotate button I always felt was unnecessarily big and didn't feel great. There aren't enough customisable buttons to control more niche parts of Lightroom (or control additional tools that are released in newer versions).

With all that in mind, the new keys, better build quality and more customisation options of the Loupedeck+ should be very welcome additions.

The final problem I've had with all Lightroom controllers is Lightroom. It's still too bloody slow. The addition of other photo editors gives me even fewer obstacles now to try alternative solutions.
 

Mt Spokane Photography

Spends too much time on this forum
Mar 25, 2011
14,396
18
#18
RGF said:
Mt Spokane Photography said:
I've looked at the Midi solutions, and the issues with them, so I finally bit the bullet and ordered the Loupedeck+. I have issues using my fingers to control fine movements of my mouse, so I intend to see how well it works. It is definitely a low cost solution to a editing deck, for video, you can spend a lot more.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1394885-REG/slate_digital_sym_ravcore_dd_raven_mti_core_station.html
please post a review of the loupedeck+ based on actual use by a real user. I can suspicious of many of the on line reviews which appear to be paid
I'll post one after I get the new unit. I am looking for help for my finger issue, so my focus is on being able to edit the 5000+ recent images that have been taking forever because of my hand issues and decreasing ability to control a mouse. It costs in the same price range as some high end ergonomic mice, so I decided to give it a try.
There will always be paid or influenced reviews, however, some reviewers have a good reputation for saying what they think. As always, reviewers may be looking at what they see as important, and not mention a feature that you see as a issue.
Suprisingly, here is one of the better reviews I've seen, probably because it reflects my opinion of the device. But, if it helps with my finger / hand issue, then it would score high with me.
https://www.pcmag.com/review/359940/loupedeck
 

-1

EOS M6
Dec 18, 2014
182
0
#19
jkreibich said:
Anyone interested in the Loupedeck should have a look at MIDI2LR.
https://rsjaffe.github.io/MIDI2LR/

MIDI2LR allows you to control most of LightRoom's tools using any MIDI control board. A popular one is the BEHRINGER X-TOUCH MINI, which costs a whole USD$50. https://www.amazon.com/dp/B013JLZCLS/ Even better, the whole system is fully customizable, so you can assign whatever LR controls you want to the physical controls of your particular MIDI system.

I spent a lot of time looking at the original Loupedeck, but it is rather expensive. After hearing about MIDI2LR in some comments, I tried it and have never looked back. Having physical controls is a HUGE speed boost, but there is no need to expensive custom hardware. Don't worry about MIDI hardware... most of these systems are USB based, and simple easy to setup and use.
Since I don't use LR: Have you tried this with Photoshop? Palette Gear seems to do that but it's expensive...

https://petapixel.com/2018/03/07/loupedeck-vs-palette-gear-comparing-lightroom-photo-editing-consoles/