I remember this camera, I picked it up from somewhere back when it was great to be wheeling and dealing on eBay and whatnot. I took it out to the park in Scarborough Bluffs and at least 2 of the shots from that day ended up as 20×30 prints on my wall. It's amazing what that little camera could do.

Gordan has written up a review looking back at Canon's first affordable DSLR – and unless my memory is failing me, it was the industry's first affordable DSLR back in 2003. It was so popular that Nikon had to make a development announcement on the D70 to stop the bleeding, as people were jumping ship on mass over to the Canon 300D.

From Gordon's Review;

It’s no exaggeration to describe Canon’s EOS 300D or Digital Rebel as ground-breaking both when it was new in 2003 and looking back two decades later. As the most affordable DSLR to date and crucially one that squeezed-in under a grand including a kit zoom, it was the model many enthusiasts had been waiting for, allowing them to finally graduate from compacts to a proper camera.

At last they had the large sensor they always wanted, the chance to swap lenses, and compose through them using a proper SLR viewfinder. Sure, the cropped sensor may have effectively multiplied all focal lengths by 1.6x, but it was a small price to pay, and besides, dedicated ultra-wide zooms were on their way.

https://www.cameralabs.com/canon-eos-300d-digital-rebel-retro-review/

Read the full review from Gordon at Cameralabs here.

The Canon EOS 300D had a neat “feature” that Canon slipped up with. With a small firmware “hack” you could give the 300D the same feature set as the 10D. Canon then learned its lesson after the 300D and didn't repeat the same easy-to-circumvent Canon Cripple Hammer™ ever again.

If you are curious and have an old 300D – here's the firmware update downloadable here. We're not responsible for you using it, of course.

Remember to check out used gear from our friends at B&H Photovideo.

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11 comments

  1. My wife and I used a 20D + 350D combo for years and years, those cameras were a lot of fun! We sold the 350D, but kept the kit lens, not sure why :)
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  2. My wife and I used a 20D + 350D combo for years and years, those cameras were a lot of fun! We sold the 350D, but kept the kit lens, not sure why :)
    That kit lens is for the mighty R100 to frighten Richard
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  3. My wife and I bought one in 2004. I have a large print from it up in my house still. Eventually bought a 40D and passed this one on to a grad student my wife worked with at the time.

    The weird thing is, I remember buying it before a trip we were taking, and we justified to ourselves the cost of film and development would eventually pay off the high price of the camera. I suppose that turned out to be true! I have no idea how many frames we took with it, but our previous trip to Yosemite with a Film Rebel camera we had at least a couple hundred dollars in film and development.

    Brian
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  4. My wife and I bought one in 2004. I have a large print from it up in my house still. Eventually bought a 40D and passed this one on to a grad student my wife worked with at the time.

    The weird thing is, I remember buying it before a trip we were taking, and we justified to ourselves the cost of film and development would eventually pay off the high price of the camera. I suppose that turned out to be true! I have no idea how many frames we took with it, but our previous trip to Yosemite with a Film Rebel camera we had at least a couple hundred dollars in film and development.

    Brian

    The 40D changed everything for me, what a camera.
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  5. I remember this camera, I picked it up from somewhere back when it was great to be wheeling and dealing on eBay and whatnot. I took it out to the park in Scarborough Bluffs and at least 2 of the shots from that day ended up as 20×30 prints on my wall. It's amazing what

    See full article...
    This was my fisrt digital camera (digital rebel) at 2003, when the price went down under 1K$. at 6M image it was enough to make prints should I want to. Used it for over 9 years until it broke down and I bought the 7D.
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  6. I still have mine! It really was a breakthrough.
    it was the camera that opened the floodgates for digital photography, and a few years later the 5d became the first affordable FF camera and set the bar for IQ. i owned both!
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  7. This was my second digital camera and my first dslr. I had a lot of fun with this thing and I acquired some of my most cherished images with it. When I bought it I had full intent of shooting slide film alongside. That never happened of course.
    Eventually I sold my 300d after upgrading, but I think I still have a batch of expired slide film somewhere in basement.
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  8. My first digital camera when it was just known as the Digital Rebel. Used it for 10 years until I bought the 6D. What I learned was that you needed to more than double the MPs to really make a difference, as I thought I would replace this camera with the 12.2 MP 450D, but then didn't. (Yes, I know there are exceptions if you need to crop a lot). Also learned that crop cameras did certain things better for me when I bought the 6D, and then bought a crop camera to supplement the full frame, which I still do to this day (and shoot the crop cameras far more often than the FF).
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