There has been a ton of talk about the EOS R1 in our inbox. Most media outlets are not NDA'd about the EOS R1, as its not in their hands. The EOS R5 Mark II has been shown in-person to retailers and a bunch of media outlets. The EOS R5 Mark II will begin shipping in August, but Canon has been coy with retailers about when in August. The official announcement was supposed to happen back on May 15, but was delayed to make sure they have enough of them to sell. The EOS R5 Mark II can't show up on one of those “unexpected demand” lists.

However, the EOS R1 is pretty much only in the hands of Canon Explorers and other CPS professionals and likely won't ship until mid Q4.

We have heard twice that the EOS R1 would have some version of a DGO sensor. Which would be a game changer. However, we're not sure how that would work, it would require a ton of processing power for still photography at higher framerates.

What is DGO?

Canon’s DGO sensor works by reading each pixel at two different amplification levels, one high and one low, and then combining these two readouts into a single image. The high amplification readout is optimised to capture fine details in shadow regions while reducing noise

We see DGO sensors on select Cinema EOS cameras, but how it would work for a stills camera is still a bit of a mystery to us. However, Canon has had a ton of patents in regards to HDR and dynamic range. We just haven't seen the fruits of that labor as of yet.

If Canon has figured out a way to make this work for a stills camera, then that will be a game changer and we'll see dynamic range that we have never seen before in a stills camera.

It could also be much ado about nothing, however, the EOS R1 is going to be a landmark flagship camera by all accounts. We hope to be able to add more to that before the official announcement on July 17, but we're probably at the point where surprises will be fun on announcement day.

We're going to put the proverbial “grain of salt” on this one, but it keeps coming up.

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88 comments

  1. Aint sh
    Yeah, it's one of those things that is split.
    Nothing is split at all. Just some bs excuse. It's called "purchase justification". I got more or less signal? Duh, I can't see it. Nobody wishes to be told, well you got less signal than the previous model after you paid......$xxxx
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  2. There is ONE major media organization that I know that has at least one R1…if you can think of which picture agency has an exclusive Canon deal you might be able to figure it out.
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  3. Aint sh

    Nothing is split at all. Just some bs excuse. It's called "purchase justification". I got more or less signal? Duh, I can't see it. Nobody wishes to be told, well you got less signal than the previous model after you paid......$xxxx
    Yep! Where are the blind tests indicating that people can or cannot see the difference? Until I see those, I think the best conclusion is that buyers are trying to justify to themselves and to others that they weren't stupid.
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  4. Yeah, it's one of those things that is split.
    On the one hand, more of any 'feature' is usually better...more MP, faster frame rate, more DR, etc. Typically, such things can be dialed back if the consequences are undesirable (files too large, too many images in a burst, etc.). But more isn't always necessary, and some people know that.

    During the DRone Wars of the early 2010's, I didn't argue against the importance of more DR, but rather against the significance of an additional 1-2 stops. Sure, there are some shots where that can make all the difference. But there are many situations where the scene DR is not so high that 10 stops can't capture it, and many others where the scene DR is too far great for a single image even at 16 stops.

    If we're talking about going from 12 stops of real, usable DR ('photographic DR' as opposed to 'engineering DR') up to 16 stops, that's a meaningful difference that will have a positive impact for many people. But I'm not holding my breath in the hopes that we get a 4-stop increase in either the R5II or the R1.
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  5. Dynamic range is certainly important. But not if it is an incremental improvement. If Canon managed a real-world 17+ stops this camera would be the stuff of legend. Canon has the technology to do this and more… That would match the Arri Alexa 35. However, it would probably need to be more than 12-bits to be usable. If they could also match or beat the 12 stops of exposure latitude that the Alexa 35 manages… just wow! That said, it would be great to see Canon take the lead.
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  6. More DR is always useful unless it comes to the detriment of other qualities. But, assuming everything else is equal, then the more DR the merrier. Even if it has some detrimental impact somewhere else, as long as we are given the option to choose between more DR and some compromise vs less DR and no other compromise, then I\'d say bring it on!

    Having said that, from a subjective artistic perspective, I do believe that too much DR can lead to photos that may look \"fake\" or \"boring\", at least IMHO. Same with HDR that can be easily abused. I like having a lot of DR latitude when I work on an image, but I most frequently end up dialing contrast back up for the final result, even if that results in less DR than was available in the RAW file.
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  7. More DR is always useful unless it comes to the detriment of other qualities. But, assuming everything else is equal, then the more DR the merrier. Even if it has some detrimental impact somewhere else, as long as we are given the option to choose between more DR and some compromise vs less DR and no other compromise, then I\'d say bring it on!

    Having said that, from a subjective artistic perspective, I do believe that too much DR can lead to photos that may look \"fake\" or \"boring\", at least IMHO. Same with HDR that can be easily abused. I like having a lot of DR latitude when I work on an image, but I most frequently end up dialing contrast back up for the final result, even if that results in less DR than was available in the RAW file.
    That sounds more like a problem with tone-mapping done by the RAW converter than with DR itself. And it could be solved with a custom profile or even a preset, it depends on the amount of effort you want to spend and how consistent the issue is.
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  8. Dynamic range is certainly important. But not if it is an incremental improvement. If Canon managed a real-world 17+ stops this camera would be the stuff of legend. Canon has the technology to do this and more… That would match the Arri Alexa 35. However, it would probably need to be more than 12-bits to be usable. If they could also match or beat the 12 stops of exposure latitude that the Alexa 35 manages… just wow! That said, it would be great to see Canon take the lead.
    Nitpicking, but CR3 RAW files are 14-bits. R5 downsamples to 12-bit in electronic shutter, but is otherwise 14-bit, as with all the other canon cameras.
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  9. Might make sense in combination with the earlier rumor of an increased (16-bit) bitrate using mechanical shutter. That might give it enough time to process the dual gain at slower shutter speeds, but enough bit depth to record all nuances in the data.

    At this point I'll just wait for the official announcement. I'm very curious if the sensor resolution is indeed going to be "only" 24MPx, and if so, what features (such as this) it might have to make it worthy of a flagship camera.
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  10. Guys, we're less than a week away now, and there's little to no information on this thing and lots of "it may be this, but might not be" going on. Anyone on the internet can take some shots with asterisks. What's going on? I am getting messages in my inbox from random people that I may or may not trust, as well. You guys have been very timid and overly cautious lately with little to offer. Also, you said weeks ago you'd be publishing an article about what's going on at Canon and continue to just ignore questions about that.
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  11. That sounds more like a problem with tone-mapping done by the RAW converter than with DR itself. And it could be solved with a custom profile or even a preset, it depends on the amount of effort you want to spend and how consistent the issue is.
    I'm not saying it's an unsolvable issue, just that having more DR does not necessarily automagically result in better images. IMHO
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  12. Nitpicking, but CR3 RAW files are 14-bits. R5 downsamples to 12-bit in electronic shutter, but is otherwise 14-bit, as with all the other canon cameras.
    I was thinking of in video mode, which is only 12-bit.
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  13. I think Fujifilm does this with their DR 200 and DR 400 settings in their cameras. But also don’t some Canons already do this with highlight tone priority?
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  14. FF DGO would be huge for video, think about nuclear white clipped highlights for example, similar situations where super expensive cine cameras like the Alexa 35 or the V raptor X (and the C70) are pretty much the only ones solving that.
    On some situations pulling down the highlights or exposure in general can get that highlight information but it still affects the general appearance of the overall image, by having a dual gain output combined in one frame it looks more natural.
    What a dream if if it's true, specially if it has a 14 bit readout.
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